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Introduction to Library Research

Introduction to Library Research

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Introduction to Library Research

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  1. Introduction to Library Research Composition II English 102 Leslie Murtha LMurtha@atlantic.edu 609-463-4815 Instructor: J. Doe

  2. Will cover An introduction to library services Getting started on research Using the library catalog and research databases to find information on a topic Evaluating and selecting information sources to support your writing Creating a citation in MLA format Learning Objectives Know about the services of the ACCC libraries Develop a preliminary search strategy Practice the basics of catalog and database searching Identify ways to tell if a source is appropriate and credible (believable) Practice formatting a citation for a Works Cited list. Today’s class

  3. Keys to the library • Your ID card is your library card • You need your barcode and a PIN to use our self-service options • You can use your ACCC card to get books from many libraries • We can deliver books from one library to another in a few days • Use your ACCC ID card to get a borrower’s card from other libraries • We can borrow materials for you from libraries all over the US • It’s not just books! The libraries subscribe to many full-text magazines, scholarly journals, newspapers, and other online resources • You don’t have to be in the library to use our online resources • Librarians are happy to help you find information and learn to be an effective researcher • Remember to bring money for printing and copying, and a USB drive to save your work

  4. Library Research Process • Relevant to your class • Interesting to you ToolsVocabularyStrategies Select a topic • Overview • Issues & controversies • Important people, places, events • Key words and concepts • Books, articles, web sites, … • Who studies this question? • What words describe your topic? Find background information Search for relevant information Read and digest • Open-ended (not yes/no) • Not too broad • Not too narrow or local • Examines relationships Draft research question(s) Refine question(s)

  5. Getting Started • What is your research question? • Where should you look? • What types of sources will be useful? • Background and context • Evidence • What terms should you use for searching?

  6. Research Question Broad Topic: Media violence Preliminary Research Question: How are children affected by media violence? Key Concepts

  7. Choosing Search Terms • Computers don’t think in sentences. • Select the most important ideas in your question. • Words like “effects,” “causes,” “issues” rarely work as search terms. • Make a list of synonyms and related concepts to expand your search.

  8. OR Returns records containing any of the terms Use for words with similar meanings or for related concepts Combining terms with OR makes your set of results bigger Using Boolean Operators

  9. Using Boolean Operators OR

  10. Using Boolean Operators OR

  11. OR Returns records containing any of the terms Use for words with similar meanings or for related concepts Combining terms with OR makes your set of results bigger AND Returns records containing all of the terms Use to make connections between 2 or more ideas Combining terms with AND makes your set of results smaller. Using Boolean Operators

  12. Using Boolean Operators AND

  13. Using Boolean Operators AND

  14. Discussion Question How do you decide whether or not to use a source for your paper?

  15. Evaluation Criteria Relevance Audience Purpose Point of View Authority Accuracy Currency Clarity

  16. Relevance Which book would you choose for this topic? Topic: bullying in schools

  17. Audience and Purpose Topic: bullying in schools Which book would you choose for a college research paper?

  18. Audience and Purpose Which periodical publishes scholarly research?

  19. Scholarly Literature • Authority: written by people who study the subject professionally. • Review by known experts enhances authority • Audience: other experts and students • Purpose: to report on the results of research and/or propose new theoretical ideas (explanations) • Characteristics • Formal language • Literature review (ties current research to the work of others in the field • Bibliography and in-text citations

  20. Scholarly Literature • Authority: written by people who study the subject professionally. • Review by known experts enhances authority • Audience: other experts and students • Purpose: to report on the results of research and/or propose new theoretical ideas (explanations) • Characteristics • Formal language • Literature review (ties current research to the work of others in the field • Bibliography and in-text citations

  21. MLA Style Citations

  22. Components Author Title Place Publisher Year Publication Format In text Hoffer suggests that the United States, from the earliest European settlement, has been a nation of gamblers (1). Citing a book Works Cited Hoffer, Richard. Jackpot Nation: Rambling and Gambling Across Our Landscape of Luck. New York: Harper Collins, 2007. Print.

  23. Components Author Chapter Title Book Title *Editor(s)* Place Publisher Year Pages Publication format There is evidence to suggest that gambling is a growing problem among middle income professionals (Lee, 43). Citing a Chapter in a Book Lee, Bill. “White-Collar Gambling.” Born to Lose: Memoirs of a Compulsive Gambler. Center City, MN: Hazelden, 2005. 43-54. Print. Online? Add • Database Title • Date of Access

  24. Components Author Article Title Journal Title Volume # *Issue #* Year Pages Publication Format Research by Cuillier and Ross suggests that Native American tribes whose economy is supported by casinos may tend to represent their identity through outdated stereotypes derived from White culture (211). Citing a Scholarly Article Cuillier, David, and Ross, Susan D. “Gambling with Identity: Self-Representation of American Indians on Official Tribal Websites.” Howard Journal of Communications, 18 :3 (2007): 197-219. Academic Search Premier. Web. 31 Jan. 2011. Online? Add • Database Title • Date of Access

  25. Components Author Date Article Title Magazine Title *Volume #* *Issue #* Pages Publication Format Citing a Magazine Article “The rise of Indian-owned casinos is an outgrowth of legislation enacted by Congress in the form of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988” (Layng, 70). Layng, A. “Indian Casinos: Past Precedents and Future Prospects.” USA Today Magazine March. 1996: 70. Academic Search Premier. Web. 31 Jan. 2011. Online? Add • Database Title • Date of Access

  26. Components *Author* Section Title** Web Site Title Editor* Site Sponsor* Year** Publication Format URL*** Advocates for the legalization of online gambling declare that it is possible to regulate electronic gaming just as effectively as it is controlled in traditional casinos (“Compulsive”). Citing a Section of a Web Site “Compulsive Gambling Safeguards.” Safe & Secure Internet Gambling Initiative. Safe & Secure Internet Gambling Initiative, 2010. Web. 31 Jan 2011 <http://www.safeandsecureig.org/node/19/>.

  27. Works Cited “Compulsive Gambling Safeguards.” Safe & Secure Internet Gambling Initiative. Safe & Secure Internet Gambling Initiative, 2010. Web. 31 Jan 2011 <http://www.safeandsecureig.org/node/19/>. Cuillier, David, and Ross, Susan D. “Gambling with Identity: Self-Representation of American Indians on Official Tribal Websites.” Howard Journal of Communications, 18 :3 (2007): 197-219. Academic Search Premier. Web. 31 Jan. 2011. Hoffer, Richard. Jackpot Nation: Rambling and Gambling Across Our Landscape of Luck. New York: Harper Collins, 2007. Print. Layng, A. “Indian Casinos: Past Precedents and Future Prospects.” USA Today Magazine March. 1996: 70. Academic Search Premier. Web. 31 Jan. 2011. Lee, Bill. (2005). “White-Collar Gambling.” Born to Lose: Memoirs of a Compulsive Gambler. Center City, MN: Hazelden, 2005. 43-54. Print.

  28. Remember to activate your library cards. Use encyclopedias and other reference books for background information. Identify key concepts Use synonyms to expand your search Use OR for similar terms and AND for terms with different meanings Use the library catalog for books, and research databases for articles. Scholarly literature is written by experts for experts and students. Always includes a bibliography Always be a little skeptical. Look beyond the surface to evaluate your sources. Take notes about the tools and search terms you use. Get started early. Research takes time Review