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4. Creating Effective Presentations Seminar II 241-702 , Semester 2 , 2009-2010 Overview Planning Your Presentation Writing Your Presentation Designing Your Presentation Presenting Your Presentation A Home Slide (explained later) Overview Planning Your Presentation

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4 creating effective presentations

4. Creating Effective Presentations

Seminar II

241-702, Semester 2, 2009-2010

overview
Overview

Planning Your Presentation

Writing Your Presentation

Designing Your Presentation

Presenting Your Presentation

A Home Slide

(explained later)

overview3
Overview

Planning Your Presentation

Writing Your Presentation

Designing Your Presentation

Presenting Your Presentation

planning your presentation
Planning Your Presentation

Audience

Purpose

Topic

Presentation Management

planning your presentation audience
Planning Your Presentation – Audience

Who is your audience?

a manager, supervisor, thesis committee member?

What does the audience want?

Aim your talk so everyone can understand it

Don't underestimate your audience!

find out their knowledge / background

planning your presentation what your audience wants
Planning Your Presentation – What Your Audience Wants

A presentation is more than just reading slides

Have slides with enough information, but not too much

An interesting presentation will keep people awake

planning your presentation purpose
Planning Your Presentation – Purpose

Why are you giving the presentation?

e.g. To inform:“My aim is to inform the audience about the role of shaders in gaming.”

e.g. To argue:“My aim is to persuade the audience of the need for bigger penalties for illegal downloading.”

planning your presentation topic
Planning Your Presentation – Topic

How do you break the topic down?

Follow the structure of your report

e.g. lit. review, experiments, results

Leave out details / sub-sections

Don't add material which is not in the report

overview9
Overview

Planning Your Presentation

Writing Your Presentation

Designing Your Presentation

Presenting Your Presentation

Back to the

Home Slide

writing your presentation
Writing Your Presentation

The Shape of a Talk

Information

Sub-Home Slide

the shape of a talk
The Shape of a Talk

Introduction Slide:

contains presentation title, presenter name, e-mail, supervisor, date

Overview Slides:

Use several hierarchical levels of overview slides if necessary

State main points of presentation

Use a Home Slide

Project Statement

Middle and Conclusion

see next few slides

the structure of a good talk start broad get specific and end broad13
The structure of a good talk: start broad, get specific, and end broad

Start with the big questions and get more specific

the home slide
The Home Slide

Include a “home slide” that you come back to at each major transition ('episode') in your talk.

the structure of a good talk start broad get specific and end broad15
The structure of a good talk: start broad, get specific, and end broad

The middle is the meat of the talk…

but talks are delivered to audiences with limited attention spans
…but talks are delivered to audiences with limited attention spans

Audience attention curve

the structure of a talk start broad get specific and end broad
The structure of a talk: start broad, get specific, and end broad

The middle is when the audience falls asleep

the structure of a talk start broad get specific and end broad18
The structure of a talk: start broad, get specific, and end broad

After going into depth, come back to your home slide to make transitions

Nontechnical

General

technical

Specialist

use your home slide build a theme over time and let the audience to catch up
Use your home slide build a theme over time and let the audience to catch up

home slide

Nontechnical

General

technical

Specialist

organizing the middle
Organizing the Middle
  • Follow the structure of your report:
    • e.g. literature review, sections on experiments, results
  • Leave out lots of detail/sub-sections
    • the audience can read the report
  • Do not add things which are not in the report.
audience attention increases as you signal the end of the talk so have a strong end
Audience attention increases as you signal the end of the talk – so have a strong end!

Audience attention curve

the structure of a talk start broad get specific and end broad23
The structure of a talk: start broad, get specific, and end broad

End with the most specific conclusions

then build back out to the “big picture”

organizing a good talk
Organizing a good talk

• Your introduction should

start broad then get specific

organizing a good talk25
Organizing a good talk

•Your introduction should

start broad then get specific

• Think of your talk as

consisting of episodes

organizing a good talk26
Organizing a good talk

• Your introduction should

start broad then get specific

• Think of your talk as

consisting of episodes

• Use a home slide to make

transitions effectively

organizing a good talk27
Organizing a good talk

•Your introduction should

start broad then get specific

• Think of your talk as

consisting of episodes

• Use a home slide to make

transitions effectively

• Your conclusion should start

specific but end broadly

concluding
Concluding
  • Tell audience that you’re about to finish
  • Summarize main points
  • Specific → general
  • Say something that the audience will remember
  • Answer questions

“Tell ’em What You Told ‘em.”

writing your presentation29
Writing Your Presentation

The Shape of a Talk

Information

Sub-Home Slide

information selection
Information – Selection

Present essential information: not too little

Information on slides should be self-explanatory and complete

A confusing sentence, or unexplained image, is not useful information

information grammar
Information – Grammar

Avoid abbreviations and acronyms not obvious to the audience

Eliminate personal pronouns or articles when it makes sense

Use whole sentences or fragments, but be consistent

Limit punctuation marks

Use present tense when possible

information slide density
Information – Slide Density

Write a maximum of 2 lines per bullet, if possible

Limit to 6 bullets per slide

Avoid long sentences

Keep slides simple, so they can be understood within a few seconds

If a slide contains too much information, split it in two

information use humour carefully
Information – Use Humour Carefully
  • What is funny to you may not be funny to someone else
  • Humour can confuse / upset
  • But,... humour can make the audience relax
information clarity
Information – Clarity
  • Avoid jargon
  • Use clear and simple visual aids
  • Be well organized
    • e.g. set up the computer beforehand
  • Let me catch up if I fall asleep in the middle
  • Don’t go over time
overview37
Overview

Planning Your Presentation

Writing Your Presentation

Designing Your Presentation

Presenting Your Presentation

Back to the

Home Slide

designing your presentation
Designing Your Presentation

Templates

Format

Font

Visuals

Sub-Home Slide

templates
Templates

Choose template carefully

Background images and busy templates distract from the presentation content

Text should contrast strongly with background

Dark text on a light background are easy to read both on the projector and on handouts

Choose a color scheme and template that will not empty the laserprinter toner when you print the handouts

templates cont
Templates (cont.)

Use Powerpoint's slide master feature to make a consistent and simple design template

Change slide master settings at View – Master – Slide Master

Make changes to the fonts, sizes and look of master slide as needed

page numbers, headers (group logo), footers

templates color
Templates – color
  • Avoid red-green combinations because many people are red-green color blind.

Lots of people can’t read this –

and even if they could, it makes your eyes hurt.

41

slide43

View your slides in grayscale to ensure that there is adequate color contrast in each slide.

43

designing your presentation44
Designing Your Presentation

Templates

Format

Font

Visuals

Sub-Home Slide

format
Format

Use font, size, and color consistently in titles, text and bullets

Use the same transitions and animations throughout all of the presentation

Use only basic animations and transitions

fancy animations are distracting and become annoying quickly

transitions should be quick and unnoticeable

designing your presentation46
Designing Your Presentation

Templates

Format

Font

Visuals

Sub-Home Slide

slide47
Font

Use font size 24 - 48 point to make sure slides can be read from the back of the room

Font size under 20 is nearly unreadable from a distance

Use basic serif and sans serif fonts since fancy fonts can be hard to read

DON’T WRITE TEXT IN ALL CAPITAL LETTERS, IT IS DIFFICULT TO READ

Becarefulwithcolors

Use colors for emphasis but plan well

font cont
Font (cont.)

Use as few different fonts and sizes as possible

Use sans serif fonts for a clean look and readability

Use font size to indicate hierarchy

Make the font size of titles larger than text

Use a smaller font for sub-bullets or body text

designing your presentation49
Designing Your Presentation

Templates

Format

Font

Visuals

Sub-Home Slide

visuals types
Visuals – Types

Flowcharts and other drawings

Graphs and charts

Photographs and clipart

Tables

visuals uses
Visuals – Uses

Use graphics to depict:

Objects, parts, or features of an object

Actions or movements

Orientation or position

Concepts or a progression of ideas

Helps to summarize and condense information

easy to understand

Allows international communication

visuals flowchart
Visuals – Flowchart

Import audio and storyboard files

Adjust length of audio and video files

Add and edit transition effects

Create an MPEG movie file

To create an MPEG movie file:

visuals graphs
Visuals – Graphs

Use graphs rather than just charts and words

Data in graphs is easier to comprehend and retain than raw data

Trends are easier to visualize in graph form

Always title graphs

visuals photographs and clipart
Visuals – Photographs and Clipart

Use professional photographs, not clipart

Make sure images maintain impact and resolution when projected on a large screen

Source: http://www.garrreynolds.com/Presentation/slides.html

visuals tables
Visuals – Tables

Tables organize information for quick comparison

visuals
Visuals

You should be able to explain a graph or a table in a few minutes

Dense graphs or tables are difficult to follow

break up into several slides

do not to use a font size under 22 points

Tables or graphics imported directly from print material are generally bad

Fonts too small

Information too crowded and dense

Made for close-up reading, not distant viewing on a screen

visuals how not to do it
Visuals – How Not To Do It

Source: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&client=firefox&rls=com.yahoo:en-US:official&q=powerpoint+presentation+too+much+info&start=10&sa=N

overview61
Overview

Planning Your Presentation

Writing Your Presentation

Designing Your Presentation

Presenting Your Presentation

Back to the

Home Slide

presenting your presentation
Presenting Your Presentation

Rehearsal

Testing

Interaction

Handouts

rehearsal
Rehearsal

Use the slides as a reference/summary

Slides only give the audience basic information which you fill out by speaking

The audience wants to hear what YOU have to say on the topic, not just read the slides

rehearsal single presenter
Rehearsal – Single Presenter

Practice introducing yourself and the topic

Match your speaking with your slides

Plan your presentation to allow time at the end for questions and answers

use a watch

Ask your friends for feedback

rehearsal multiple presenters
Rehearsal – Multiple Presenters

Combine individual presentations before the presentation day

Determine how to break down time among presenters

Decide who introduces the group and topic

rehearsal multiple presenters cont
Rehearsal – Multiple Presenters (cont.)

Practice a smooth transition from one presenter to the next

Do a practice run of the entire presentation with all the presenters present

Allow time for extra feedback on each presenter

rehearsal important navigation shortcuts
Rehearsal – Important Navigation Shortcuts

Practice shortcuts to make moving around in presentation easy

Up, Page Up, Mouse Wheel Up: Previous Slide

Down, Page Down, Mouse Wheel Down, Left-Click: Next Slide

Type number and press ENTER: go to specific slide. NO visual feedback as number is entered

B – Blank screen: displays black screen. Useful if you want audience to stop reading

W – White screen. Displays white screen. Similar to 'B', but less jarring if presentation has a white background

rehearsal important navigation shortcuts cont
Rehearsal – Important Navigation Shortcuts (cont.)

A – Hide pointer. Makes on-screen arrow cursor go away. Cursor normally disappears if not moved for a few seconds

CTRL-P – Pen mode. Lets you write on your presentation. Not recommended for many laptop pointing devices

E – Erase pen marks

Esc - Terminate slide show

F5 – Start slide show

presenting your presentation69
Presenting Your Presentation

Rehearsal

Testing

Interaction

Handouts

testing
Testing

Test presentation on actual presentation system BEFORE presentation

Things can and do go wrong

One system may have different versions and requirements and than another system and the presentation cannot run

Slides may be unreadable from back seats and have to be changed

Unusual fonts may be unreadable on a different system

Bring presentation on several media in case one source fails.

Use a memory stick or CD

Send as an attachment to an online email account

Print handouts for the audience

presenting your presentation71
Presenting Your Presentation

Rehearsal

Testing

Interaction

Handouts

interaction
Interaction

Don’t read from your slides.

Don’t read to your slides.

Face the audience, not the screen

Don’t apologize for your slides

Don’t turn off all lights

light keeps the audience awake

Do interact with your audience.

interaction cont
Interaction (cont.)

Speak at a comfortable speed

Do not speed up to cover more information!

Face the audience and make eye contact.

Vary the tone of your voice.

Don’t pace up and down but don’t stand still or sit (hide) behind a computer.

interaction cont74
Interaction (cont.)

Remember that a good presentation is a story

Give a brief overview of information at the start

Present information

Review important points in the conclusion

Allow for audience responses and questions

interaction common problems
Interaction – Common Problems
  • Verbal junk: “Like” or “Um” or “Uh”
  • Whispering
  • Swaying, rocking, and pacing
  • Hands in pockets
  • Lip smacking
  • Fidgeting (with pens, the mouse)
  • Not looking at the audience
  • Hiding behind the computer
presenting your presentation76
Presenting Your Presentation

Rehearsal

Testing

Interaction

Handouts

handouts
Handouts

Provide a hard copy of your slides to allow viewers to focus on you, not note taking

Handouts allow the audience to take notes directly on relevant slides

13 ways to derail a presentation
13 Ways to Derail a Presentation
  • 1. Technical difficulties
    • leave nothing to chance.
  • 2. Bad delivery
    • e.g., monotone voice, no eye contact, speaking too fast
  • 3. Boring presentation title

http://www.powerpointninja.com/

slide79

4. Boring presentation template

  • 5. No agenda
    • What topics will your slides cover?
    • What will the audience get out of your presentation?
  • 6. No opening hook
    • grab the attention of your audience
    • use humour, anecdotes, curious facts, or quotes
slide80

7. Weak visuals

    • unoriginal or mismatched pictures
  • 8. Spelling mistake
    • shows that you are lazzeee
  • 9. Poorly-designed template
    • poor contrast between the fonts and background
    • too busy background
slide81

10. Presenter/slide confusion

    • make sure you rehearse your slides
  • 11. Incorrect fact or statement
    • check things with your supervisor / team members
  • 12. Information overload
  • 13. Small fonts
slide82

The Speed Demon

  • The Ummmer
  • The Reader
  • The Eye Avoider
  • The Lifeless Drone
  • The Firehose
  • The Time Mismanager
  • The Apologist
  • The Wanderer
  • The One-Way Ticket

Ten types of bad presenters:

http://www.powerpointninja.com/presentation-delivery/attack-of-the-bad-presenters-part-i/

slide83

The Eye Avoider

  • unable or unwilling to establish eye contact with his audience

The Ummmer

  • the curse of the “um”
  • beware of Ummmer’s cousin, “The Uhhher”
slide84

The Wanderer

  • the slides are simply an inconvenience
  • lots of useless facts, random opinions, and incomplete thoughts

The Time Mismanager

  • not bothered by time constraints or rehearsing the pacing of their slides