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Chapter 8. Test Prep Game. What causes a surface current? Earth’s Orbit Wind Earth’s Rotation Temperature. What causes a surface current? Earth’s Orbit Wind Earth’s Rotation Temperature. How can an increase in CO 2 in the air affect seawater? O 2 levels rise O 2 levels fall

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chapter 8

Chapter 8

Test Prep Game

slide2

What causes a surface current?

    • Earth’s Orbit
    • Wind
    • Earth’s Rotation
    • Temperature
slide3

What causes a surface current?

    • Earth’s Orbit
    • Wind
    • Earth’s Rotation
    • Temperature
slide4

How can an increase in CO2 in the air affect seawater?

    • O2 levels rise
    • O2 levels fall
    • pH falls
    • pH rises
slide5

How can an increase in CO2 in the air affect seawater?

    • O2 levels rise
    • O2 levels fall
    • pH falls
    • pH rises
slide8

A(n) __________ occurs when the Earth, Moon and Sun are in a straight line.

    • Spring Tide
    • Neap Tide
    • High Tide
    • Low Tide
slide9

A(n) __________ occurs when the Earth, Moon and Sun are in a straight line.

    • Spring Tide
    • Neap Tide
    • High Tide
    • Low Tide
slide10

A ____________ is a large volume of water flowing in one direction.

    • Tsunami
    • Tidal Range
    • Upwelling
    • Current
slide11

A ____________ is a large volume of water flowing in one direction.

    • Tsunami
    • Tidal Range
    • Upwelling
    • Current
slide12

A(n) _______ carries warm and cold water in a circular system.

    • Upwelling
    • Tsunami
    • Gyre
    • Harmful Algal Bloom
slide13

A(n) _______ carries warm and cold water in a circular system.

    • Upwelling
    • Tsunami
    • Gyre
    • Harmful Algal Bloom
slide14

A(n) _________ is a vertical movement of water towards the surface.

    • Upwelling
    • Tsunami
    • Gyre
    • Harmful Algal Bloom
slide15

A(n) _________ is a vertical movement of water towards the surface.

    • Upwelling
    • Tsunami
    • Gyre
    • Harmful Algal Bloom
slide16

Which is NOT a cause of tsunamis?

    • Earthquakes
    • Landslides
    • Volcanic Eruptions
    • Hurricanes
slide17

Which is NOT a cause of tsunamis?

    • Earthquakes
    • Landslides
    • Volcanic Eruptions
    • Hurricanes
slide18

Which moves water horizontally?

    • Density Current
    • Temperature Currents
    • Surface Currents
    • Upwellings
slide19

Which moves water horizontally?

    • Density Current
    • Temperature Currents
    • Surface Currents
    • Upwellings
slide20

Which is NOT an consequence of rising ocean temperature?

    • Coral Bleaching
    • Shells Dissolving
    • Glacial Melting
    • Rising Sea Level
slide21

Which is NOT an consequence of rising ocean temperature?

    • Coral Bleaching
    • Shells Dissolving
    • Glacial Melting
    • Rising Sea Level
slide22

Fertilizer runoff from agricultural areas can cause and excess of __________.

    • Acid
    • CO2
    • Salts
    • Nutrients
slide23

Fertilizer runoff from agricultural areas can cause and excess of __________.

    • Acid
    • CO2
    • Salts
    • Nutrients
slide24

Currents south of the equator turn CCW because of _______________.

    • The Coriolis Effect
    • Cold Water Rising
    • The Warm Equator
    • Cold Polar Regions
slide25

Currents south of the equator turn CCW because of _______________.

    • The Coriolis Effect
    • Cold Water Rising
    • The Warm Equator
    • Cold Polar Regions
slide26

Tides are caused by ___________________.

    • The rise and fall of water
    • Changes in ocean salinity
    • The gravitational pull of the Sun and Moon
    • The interaction between sand and seawater
slide27

Tides are caused by ___________________.

    • The rise and fall of water
    • Changes in ocean salinity
    • The gravitational pull of the Sun and Moon
    • The interaction between sand and seawater
slide28

_______ is the highest point in a wave.

    • Trough
    • Crest
    • Wavelength
    • Wave Height
slide29

_______ is the highest point in a wave.

    • Trough
    • Crest
    • Wavelength
    • Wave Height
slide32

In which direction do currents flow in the Northern Hemisphere?

    • Counter Clockwise (CCW)
    • Clockwise (CW)
    • From North to South
    • From South to North
slide33

In which direction do currents flow in the Northern Hemisphere?

    • Counter Clockwise (CCW)
    • Clockwise (CW)
    • From North to South
    • From South to North

d

slide34

How long does it take to complete one cycle of the Great Ocean Conveyor Belt?

    • 1 year
    • 100 years
    • 1,000 years
    • 10 years
slide35

How long does it take to complete one cycle of the Great Ocean Conveyor Belt?

    • 1 year
    • 100 years
    • 1,000 years
    • 10 years

d

slide36

What are the names of the 5 oceans?

    • Indian, Atlantic, Pacific, Antarctic, Southern
    • Indian, Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Southern
    • Indian, Antarctic, Pacific, Arctic, Southern
    • Indian, Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Antarctic
slide37

What are the names of the 5 oceans?

    • Indian, Atlantic, Pacific, Antarctic, Southern
    • Indian, Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Southern
    • Indian, Antarctic, Pacific, Arctic, Southern
    • Indian, Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Antarctic

d

slide38

Which ocean is the largest and deepest?

    • Indian
    • Atlantic
    • Pacific
    • Arctic
slide39

Which ocean is the largest and deepest?

    • Indian
    • Atlantic
    • Pacific
    • Arctic

d

slide40

When did the oceans begin to form?

    • 3.5 Million Years Ago
    • 4.2 Billion Years Ago
    • 100,000 Years Ago
    • 542 Million Years Ago
slide41

When did the oceans begin to form?

    • 3.5 Million Years Ago
    • 4.2 Billion Years Ago
    • 100,000 Years Ago
    • 542 Million Years Ago

d

slide42

What are the three main ingredients of seawater?

    • Chlorine, Sodium, Carbon
    • Sodium, Sulfate, Nitrogen
    • Chlorine, Sulfate, Potassium
    • Chlorine, Sodium, Sulfate
slide43

What are the three main ingredients of seawater?

    • Chlorine, Sodium, Carbon
    • Sodium, Sulfate, Nitrogen
    • Chlorine, Sulfate, Potassium
    • Chlorine, Sodium, Sulfate

d

slide44

Which of the following seafloor features is closest to a continent?

    • Continental Slope
    • Trench
    • Continental Margin
    • Abyssal Plain
slide45

Which of the following seafloor features is closest to a continent?

    • Continental Slope
    • Trench
    • Continental Margin
    • Abyssal Plain

d

slide46

What are the two main Seafloor resources?

    • Energy and Sand
    • Energy and Minerals
    • Sand and Minerals
    • Water and Sand
slide47

What are the two main Seafloor resources?

    • Energy and Sand
    • Energy and Minerals
    • Sand and Minerals
    • Water and Sand

d

slide48

What is the name for the large, flat areas across the deepest part of the seafloor?

    • Mid-Ocean Ridges
    • Ocean Trenches
    • Abyssal Plains
    • Continental Margins
slide49

What is the name for the large, flat areas across the deepest part of the seafloor?

    • Mid-Ocean Ridges
    • Ocean Trenches
    • Abyssal Plains
    • Continental Margins

d

slide50

What is a Tidal Range?

    • A mountain that occurs at Low Tide
    • The height difference between High and Low Tide
    • A mountain that occurs at High Tide
    • The height difference between Spring and Neap Tide
slide51

What is a Tidal Range?

    • A mountain that occurs at Low Tide
    • The height difference between High and Low Tide
    • A mountain that occurs at High Tide
    • The height difference between Spring and Neap Tide

d

slide52

What is the largest ocean pollution source?

    • Shipping Spills
    • Trash Dumping
    • Airborne Pollutants
    • Land Runoff
slide53

What is the largest ocean pollution source?

    • Shipping Spills
    • Trash Dumping
    • Airborne Pollutants
    • Land Runoff
slide54

Which of the following is NOT a type of ocean pollution?

    • Melting Ice Caps
    • Solid Waste
    • Excess Sediments
    • Excess Nutrients
slide55

Which of the following is NOT a type of ocean pollution?

    • Melting Ice Caps
    • Solid Waste
    • Excess Sediments
    • Excess Nutrients
slide56

How large is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?

    • About the Size of Rhode Island
    • About the Size of Indiana
    • About Twice the Size of Texas
    • About the Size of the United States
slide57

How large is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?

    • About the Size of Rhode Island
    • About the Size of Indiana
    • About Twice the Size of Texas
    • About the Size of the United States
slide58

What is the main source of excess nutrients in the oceans?

    • Hospital Waste
    • Dumping Vitamins in the Ocean
    • Removing Trees from Shorelines
    • Fertilizers and Other Farm Products
slide59

What is the main source of excess nutrients in the oceans?

    • Hospital Waste
    • Dumping Vitamins in the Ocean
    • Removing Trees from Shorelines
    • Fertilizers and Other Farm Products

d

slide60

How much of a change in ocean temperature is required for Coral Bleaching to start?

    • 1 C
    • 5 C
    • 10 C
    • 25 C
slide61

How much of a change in ocean temperature is required for Coral Bleaching to start?

    • 1 C
    • 5 C
    • 10 C
    • 25 C

d

slide62

Tie-Breaker Question: How deep is the Mariana Trench (in feet)?

Note: Must be closest to the correct answer without going over.

slide63

Tie-Breaker Question: How deep is the Mariana Trench (in feet)?

36,201 Feet

Note: Must be closest to the correct answer without going over.