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Prepositional Phrases. Prepositional Phrases . Introduction Activity: Write a sentence or two that tells where and when you might read a book. Prepositional Phrases . Now let’s talk about prepositional phrases!

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Prepositional Phrases


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    1. Prepositional Phrases

    2. Prepositional Phrases • Introduction Activity: • Write a sentence or two that tells where and when you might read a book.

    3. Prepositional Phrases • Now let’s talk about prepositional phrases! • A prepositional phrase is a group of words that begins with a preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun, which is called the object of the preposition. • Examples: • Mr. Frillerhas an almanac from the nineteenth century. • The almanac has a special meaningfor him. Preposition Object of preposition (noun) Preposition Object of preposition (pronoun)

    4. Prepositional Phrases • Now go back to your introduction activity sentences and underline the prepositional phrase. • Draw an arrow from the preposition to the noun/pronoun that is the object of the preposition. • Example: • I read in front of the library at noon. • In front- tells where • Of the library- tells where • At noon- tells when

    5. Prepositional phrases • Prepositional Phrases: • can have a compound (more than one) object. • Examples: • Almanacs contain lists of facts and figures. • Grace shows one to her sisters and her classmates. • Prepositional Phrases: • can have more than one prepositional phrase • Example: • We left our notes under the almanac on the shelf.

    6. Prepositional Phrases • Prepositional Phrases: • Can appear anywhere in the sentence- at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end. • Examples: • At the library students examind the almanac. • Students at the library examined the almanac. • Students examined the almanac at the library.

    7. Prepositional Phrases • Day 2 Activity and Homework

    8. Pronouns after Prepositions • Introduction Activity • Read the sentence below. Tell what is wrong with it and then write it correctly. • Lisa’s dog ran to Lisa, jumped on Lisa, and stole a cookie with Lisa. • Remember back to our pronoun unit? We use pronouns to replace nouns to avoid using nouns over and over. • Now that you have corrected the sentence find the prepositions and circle them. Then, Underline the prepositional phrases, and draw an arrow from the preposition to the pronoun in the prepositional phrase.

    9. Pronouns after Prepositions • When a pronoun is the object of a preposition, remember to use an object pronoun and not a subject pronoun. • Example: • Michael handed the dictionary to Sarah. • Replace Sarah with object pronoun- • HER • Michael handed the dictionary to her.

    10. Pronouns after prepositions • Sometimes a preposition will have a compound object consisting of a noun and pronoun. • Remember to use an object pronoun in a compound object. • Example: • I borrowed the dictionary from Sam and Jacob. • Replace Jacob with object pronoun • HIM • I borrowed the dictionary from Sam and him. • How do you know to use HIM rather than HE? • Test it out- try saying the sentence aloud with only the pronoun following the preposition. • I borrowed the dictonary from him (NOT he).

    11. Pronouns after prepositions • Confusing WHO and WHOM • The pronouns who and whom are often confused. Who is a subject pronoun, and whom is an object pronoun. • Note how the pronouns are used in the following sentences: • Who told you about it? • (Who is the subject) • To whom did you lend the almanac? • ( whom is the object) • YOU  is the subject of the sentence

    12. Pronouns after prepositions • Day 3 Activity and Homework

    13. Prepositional Phrases as adjectives and adverbs • Introduction activity • Before starting today’s lesson, let’s learn a song to help us remember some of those commonly used prepositions!! Follow along singing to the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle little star!

    14. Prepositional Phrases as adjectives and adverbs • Preposition Song (To the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star) At, around, above, about Over, nearer, nearest, out For, becoming, after, through From, beneath, beyond, of, to Since, beside, between, by, at Off, on, up, along, into

    15. Prepositional Phrases as adjectives and adverbs • Now that we reviewed some of the many prepositions that are out there, write FIVE sentences that have at least one prepositional phrase in each. • We will come back to those sentences at the end of our lesson.

    16. Prepositional Phrases as adjectives and adverbs • Prepositional phrases function as adjectives and adverbs in sentences. • A preprepositional phrase functioning as an adjective describes a noun or pronoun. • These phrases usually come directly after the noun or pronoun it describes. • Example: • (underline the prepositional phrase, and then draw an arrow to the noun/pronoun it is describing) • Africa is continent with many natural resources. • One of the articles describes Africa vividly. • The wildlife of Africa is varied and abundant.

    17. Prepositional Phrases as adjectives and adverbs • A prepositional phrase functioning as an adverb describes a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.

    18. Prepositional Phrases as adjectives and adverbs • Go back to the sentences you wrote at the beginning of the lesson. Now, exchange papers at your tables. • Draw a line from each prepositional phrase in the sentence to the word being described. • Day 4 Activity and Homework

    19. Telling prepositions and adverbs apart • Introduction Activity: • Let’s practice our song we learned from yesterday first! • Now, I would like you to create FOUR sentences using the following words: • ABOVE • OVER • INSIDE • BEFORE • For each sentence write the word or words that answer the question where? Or when? • Example: The clock is above the door. • Where is the clock? (above the door)

    20. Telling prepositions and adverbs apart • Sometimes it is difficult to tell whether a word is a preposition or an adverb. Both types of words can answer the questions: • Where? And When? as we just saw with our introduction activity. • Several words are commonly used as prepositions and adverbs. These are the words you want to look at carefully when you see them!

    21. Telling prepositions and adverbs apart • Having trouble decided whether a word is used as preposition or adverb? • LOOK at the other words in the sentence • Followed closely by a noun- it is most likely a preposition and it is the object of the preposition. • A preposition will be followed by the prepositional phrase, whereas the adverb will not. • Examples: • We ate our lunch outside the library. • Preposition or Adverb? • Preposition • OUTSIDE is followed by LIBRARY  prepositional phrase: outside the library. • We ate our lunch outside. • Adverb • OUTSIDE answeres the question where? But is not followed by a noun, which makes it an adverb in this sentence.

    22. Prepositions • Wrap up video: http://www.brainpop.com/english/grammar/prepositionalphrases/ • Day 5 Activity and Homework