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Excel Lesson 1 Excel Basics Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory Objectives Define the terms spreadsheet and worksheet. Identify the parts of a worksheet. Open an existing workbook. Save a workbook. Move the active cell in a worksheet. Select cells and enter data in a worksheet.

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excel lesson 1 excel basics

Excel Lesson 1Excel Basics

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

objectives
Objectives
  • Define the terms spreadsheet and worksheet.
  • Identify the parts of a worksheet.
  • Open an existing workbook.
  • Save a workbook.
  • Move the active cell in a worksheet.
  • Select cells and enter data in a worksheet.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

objectives continued
Objectives (continued)
  • Edit data in cells.
  • Find and replace data.
  • Zoom in a worksheet.
  • Preview and print a worksheet.
  • Close a workbook.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

vocabulary
Active cell

Active worksheet

Cell

Cell reference

Column

Formula

Formula Bar

Microsoft Office Excel 2007 (Excel)

Name Box

Range

Range reference

Row

Sheet tab

Spreadsheet

Workbook

Worksheet

Vocabulary

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

introduction to spreadsheets
Introduction to Spreadsheets
  • Microsoft Office Excel 2007 (or Excel) is a spreadsheet program. A spreadsheet is a grid of rows and columns in which you enter text, numbers, and the results of calculations.
  • The purpose of a spreadsheet is to solve problems that involve numbers. Computer spreadsheets have the ability to complete complex and repetitious calculations quickly and accurately.
  • In Excel, a computerized spreadsheet is called a worksheet. The file used to store worksheets is called a workbook. Usually, workbooks contain a collection of related worksheets.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

starting excel
Starting Excel
  • You start Excel from the Start menu in Windows. Click the Start button, click All Programs, click Microsoft Office, and then click Microsoft Office Excel 2007.
  • When Excel starts, the program window displays a blank workbook titled Book1, which includes three blank worksheets titled Sheet1, Sheet2, and Sheet3.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

exploring the parts of the worksheet
Exploring the Parts of the Worksheet
  • The name of each worksheet appears in the sheet tab at the bottom of the worksheet window. Columns appear vertically and are identified by letters. Rows appear horizontally and are identified by numbers.
  • A cell is the intersection of a row and a column. Each cell is identified by a unique cell reference, which is formed by combining the cell’s column letter and row number. For example, the cell that intersects at column C and row 4 has the cell reference C4.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

exploring the parts of the worksheet continued
Exploring the Parts of the Worksheet (continued)
  • The cell in the worksheet in which you can type data is called the active cell. The Name Box, or cell reference area located below the Ribbon, displays the cell reference of the active cell.
  • The Formula Bar appears to the right of the Name Box and displays a formula when the cell of a worksheet contains a calculated value (or the results of the formula).
  • A formula is an equation that calculates a new value from values currently in a worksheet, such as adding the numbers in cell A1 and A2.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

opening an existing workbook
Opening an Existing Workbook
  • Opening a workbook means loading an existing workbook file from a disk into the program window. You can open a workbook stored on any available disk or folder.
  • To open an existing workbook, you click the Office Button to display the Office menu, and then click Open. The Open dialog box appears. The Open dialog box shows all the workbooks in the displayed folder that were created with Excel.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

saving a workbook
Saving a Workbook
  • Saving is done two ways.
  • The Save command saves an existing workbook on a disk, using its current name and save location.
  • The Save As command lets you save a workbook with a new name or to a new location.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

moving the active cell in a worksheet
Moving the Active Cell in a Worksheet
  • The easiest way to change the active cell in a worksheet is to move the pointer to the cell you want to make active and click.
  • You can change the active cell by pressing the keys or by using keyboard shortcuts.
  • You might want to change the active cell to a cell in a part of the worksheet that you cannot see in the work area. The fastest way to move to that cell is with the Go To dialog box.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

selecting a group of cells
Selecting a Group of Cells
  • A group of selected cells is called a range. In an adjacent range, all cells touch each other and form a rectangle. The range is identified by its range reference, which is the cell in its upper-left corner and the cell in its lower-right corner, separated by a colon (for example, A3:C5).
  • To select an adjacent range, click the cell in one corner of the range, drag the pointer to the cell in the opposite corner of the range, and then release the mouse button.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

selecting a group of cells continued
Selecting a Group of Cells (continued)
  • A non-adjacent range includes two or more adjacent ranges and selected cells. The range reference for a nonadjacent range separates each range or cell with a semicolon (for example, A3:C5;E3:G5).
  • To select a non-adjacent range, select the first adjacent range or cell, press the Ctrl key as you select the other cells or ranges you want to include, and then release the Ctrl key and the mouse button.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

entering data in a cell
Entering Data in a Cell
  • Worksheet cells can contain text, numbers, or formulas.
  • Text is any combination of letters and numbers and symbols, such as headings, labels, or explanatory notes. Numbers are values, dates, or times. Formulas are equations that calculate a value.
  • You enter data in the active cell. First, type the text, numbers, or formula in the active cell. Then, click the Enter button on the Formula Bar or press the Enter or Tab key on the keyboard.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

changing data in a cell
Changing Data in a Cell
  • When you need to make a minor change to data in a cell, you can edit it in the Formula Bar or in the cell.
  • When you need to make significant changes to cell data, you can replace the entire cell contents. To replace cell contents, select the cell, type the new data, and then enter the data by clicking the Enter button on the Formula Bar or by pressing the Enter or Tab key.
  • Clearing a cell removes all the data in the cell. To clear the active cell, you can use the Ribbon, the keyboard, or the mouse.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

searching for data
Searching for Data
  • The Find command locates data in a worksheet, which is particularly helpful when a worksheet contains a large amount of data.
  • The Replace command is an extension of the Find command. Replacing data substitutes new data for the data found.
  • In the Editing group on the Home tab of the Ribbon, click the Find & Select button, and then click either Find or Replace.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

zooming worksheets
Zooming Worksheets
  • You can magnify or reduce the view of a worksheet with the Zoom controls on the status bar.
  • The default magnification for the workbooks is 100%.
  • For a closer view of a worksheet, click the Zoom In button or drag the Zoom slider to the right to increase the zoom percentage.
  • If you want to see more cells in the work area, click the Zoom Out button or drag the Zoom slider to the left to decrease the zoom percentage.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

previewing and printing a worksheet
Previewing and Printing a Worksheet
  • You can print a worksheet by clicking the Office Button, and then clicking Print to open the Print dialog box
  • Before you use the resources to print a worksheet, you should use Print Preview to see how the printed pages will look. To switch to Print Preview, click Preview in the Print dialog box.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

closing a workbook
Closing a Workbook
  • You can close a workbook by clicking the Office Button to display the Office menu and clicking Close.
  • If you use the Close command on the Office menu to close a workbook, Excel remains open and ready for you to open or create another workbook.
  • If you try to close a workbook that contains changes you haven’t saved, a dialog box opens, asking whether you want to save the file.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

summary
Summary
  • The purpose of a spreadsheet is to solve problems involving numbers. The advantage of using a computer spreadsheet is that you can complete complex and repetitious calculations quickly and accurately.
  • A worksheet consists of columns and rows that intersect to form cells. Each cell is identified by a cell reference, which combines the letter of the column and the number of the row.
  • The first time you save a workbook, the Save As dialog box opens so you can enter a descriptive name and select a save location. After that, you can use the Save command on the Office menu or the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar to periodically save the latest version of the workbook.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

summary continued
Summary (continued)
  • You can change the active cell in the worksheet by clicking the cell with the pointer, pressing keys, or using the scroll bars. The Go To dialog box lets you quickly move the active cell anywhere in the worksheet.
  • A group of selected cells is called a range. A range is identified by the cells in the upper-left and lower-right corners of the range, separated by a colon.
  • To select an adjacent range, drag the pointer across the rectangle of cells you want to include. To select a nonadjacent range, select the first adjacent range, hold down the Ctrl key, select each additional cell or range, and then release the Ctrl key.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory

summary continued22
Summary (continued)
  • Worksheet cells can contain text, numbers, and formulas. After you enter data or a formula in a cell, you can change the cell contents by editing, replacing, or deleting it.
  • You can search for specific characters in a worksheet. You can also replace data you have searched for with specific characters.
  • Zoom enables you to enlarge or reduce the view of the worksheet in the worksheet window.
  • You can print a worksheet to create a hard copy. Before you print, you should use Print Preview to see how the printed pages will look.
  • When you finish your work session, you should save your final changes and close the workbook.

Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory