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Boy Scout Troop 737 Troop Leadership Training Saint Mary’s Catholic Church November 3, 2006 Be, Know, Do The BE of leadership – Finding your vision, setting goals, leading yourself, and leading others

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boy scout troop 737 troop leadership training

Boy Scout Troop 737Troop Leadership Training

Saint Mary’s Catholic Church

November 3, 2006

be know do
Be, Know, Do
  • The BE of leadership – Finding your vision, setting goals, leading yourself, and leading others
  • The KNOW of leadership – The skills of teaching and leading to help groups achieve their goals
  • The DO of leadership – A toolbox of methods for communicating effectively, solving problems, and resolving conflicts
the know of leadership

The “KNOW” of leadership

“A leader is best when people barely know he exists; not so good when people obey and acclaim him; worst when they despise him. But a good leader who talks little when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say ‘we did it ourselves.’”

- Chinese philopher Sun-Tzu

the boy led troop
The Boy-Led Troop
  • Scouts learn by doing, and what they do is lead their patrols and their troop.
  • Boys themselves develop the troop program and then take responsibility for figuring out how they will achieve their goals.
  • In order for that to happen, a troop relies upon Scouts serving in positions of responsibility.
the boy led patrol
The Boy-Led Patrol
  • Patrols are the building blocks of a troop
  • A troop is not broken up into patrols. Patrols together form the troop
  • Patrols are made up of groups of peers, similar in age, achievement, and interests
  • Working together as a team, patrol members share the responsibility for making the patrol a success
position overview
Position Overview
  • Senior patrol leader
  • Assistant senior patrol leader
  • Patrol leader
  • Assistant patrol leader
  • Troop guide
  • Scoutmaster
  • Assistant Scoutmaster
position overview8
Position Overview
  • Chaplain Aide
  • Den Chiefs
  • Historian
  • Instructors
  • Librarian
  • Order of the Arrow Troop Representative
  • Quartermaster
  • Scribe
the be of leadership

The “BE” of leadership

“I think that American leadership is vital to peace and prosperity and the advancement of democracy in the world, and that requires having strong leaders. And I don't think there's any organization in the world, certainly not in the United States, that better prepares young men for leadership in this country than the Boy Scouts of America – in teaching leadership skills, in teaching values, in teaching importance of standing up for what's right.”

- Bill Gates

scoutmaster s vision
Scoutmaster’s Vision
  • Our troop will be a model of how every Scout troop can succeed
  • This will be a boy-run troop
  • The troop operates according to the Scout Oath and Law
  • Adult leaders give responsibility for leading the troop to the Senior Patrol Leader and the troop’s other youth leaders
  • Adult leaders will always be available to coach and mentor from the sidelines
  • All leaders, youth and adult, help every troop member learn as much as they can and enjoy the fellowship of other Scouts
  • Each patrol earns the National Honor Patrol award
patrol leaders council
Patrol Leaders Council
  • Made up of the SPL, the ASPLs, the patrol leaders, and the troop guide(s).
  • Runs the troop according to the policies of the BSA under guidance and counsel of the Scoutmaster
  • Plans the troop program at the annual program planning conference in August
  • Meets on the first Tuesday every month to plan next month’s troop activities
monthly plc meeting
Monthly PLC Meeting
  • Senior patrol leader chairs the meeting and decides the agenda
  • All PLC members have one vote
  • Scribe attends the meetings to take notes but does not vote
  • Scoutmaster and one other adult leader attend the meeting only to provide information and insight.
  • Scoutmaster can veto an activity that may violate BSA policy or jeopardize anyone’s safety or well-being.
parts of a plc meeting
Parts of a PLC Meeting
  • Opening and Call to Order
  • Roll Call and Reading of the Log (Minutes)
  • Patrol Reports
  • Old Business
  • Big Event Planning
  • Troop Meeting Planning
  • New Business
  • Scoutmaster’s Minute
troop meeting
Troop Meeting
  • The glue that holds a Scout troop together
  • Normally held on the second, third, and fourth Tuesday of each month
  • Meeting time devoted to learning new skills and organizing future campouts, service projects, and other activities will help keep interest levels and enthusiasm high
purposes of troop meetings
Purposes of Troop Meetings
  • Motivating Scouts
  • Strengthening patrols
  • Learning and practicing Scouting skills
  • Exercising leadership
  • Promoting Scout Spirit
planning a troop meeting
Planning a Troop Meeting
  • Preopening
  • Opening
  • Skills instruction
  • Patrol meetings
  • Interpatrol activity
  • Closing – Scoutmaster’s Minute
  • After the meeting
national honor patrol
National Honor Patrol
  • Have a patrol name, flag, and yell. Put the patrol design on equipment and use the patrol yell. Keep patrol records up-to-date.
  • Hold two patrol meetings each month.
  • Take part in at least one hike, outdoor activity, or other Scouting event as a patrol.
  • Complete two Good Turns or service projects approved by the patrol leaders' council.
  • Help two patrol members advance in rank.
  • Have at least 75 percent of members in full uniform at troop activities.
  • Have a representative attend at least three patrol leaders' council meetings.
  • Have eight members in the patrol or experience an increase in patrol membership.
what s your vision
What’s Your Vision?
  • Vision is what future success looks like
  • If we can see it, we can be it
  • Dream big. Dream about what is possible. Share the vision.
  • When we get to August 2007, what does success for the troop look like to you?
vision challenge
Vision Challenge
  • For December’s PLC meeting:
    • Brainstorm about what you want to achieve as a team during the year
    • Bring together all your ideas to form a vision of troop success
    • Communicate that vision to others
  • What are the measures of success?
  • How will our troop act?
  • What makes our troop unique and can we build on that as a strength?
the do of leadership

The “DO” of leadership

“The boy is not governed by don't, but is led by do.”

- Robert Baden-Powell

all troop leaders
All Troop Leaders
  • Have good attendance at Troop meeting.
  • Attend the majority of each event type during their service period.
  • Set a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.
senior patrol leader
Senior Patrol Leader
  • Youth leader with the most responsibility in the troop
  • Elected by the entire troop every 12 months and can be reelected
  • Must have earned the Star rank, be at least 14 years old, have completed the eighth grade, and have been a member of the troop for at least one year.
senior patrol leader23
Senior Patrol Leader
  • Preside at all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference.
  • Chair the Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) meeting once a month.
  • Appoint other boy leaders with the advice and consent of the Scoutmaster.
  • Assign duties and responsibilities to other junior leaders.
  • Assist with Scoutmaster in training junior leaders.
  • Delegate tasks to the ASPLs. Makes sure an ASPL attends any meeting/function he will not be able to attend (troop, PLC, Committee Meeting, etc.)
  • Oversee the planning efforts of Scouts for all Troop campouts (whether he attends these outings or not).
assistant senior patrol leader
Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
  • Appointed by the senior patrol leader to serve as his assistant
  • Responsible for a particular program area: Communications, Outdoor Program, or Training.
  • Must have earned the Star rank, be at least 13 years old, have completed the seventh grade, and have been a member of the troop for at least one year.
assistant senior patrol leader25
Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
  • Help with leading meetings and activities as called upon by the Senior Patrol Leader.
  • Take over troop leadership in the absence of the Senior Patrol Leader.
  • Be responsible for training and giving direct leadership to the following appointed junior leaders:
    • Outdoor Program: Quartermaster, Chaplain Aide. OA Troop Rep
    • Communications: Scribe, Librarian, Historian,
    • Training: All Instructors
  • Perform tasks assigned by the Senior Patrol Leader.
  • Serve as a member of the Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) and attend the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
patrol leader
Patrol Leader
  • Elected by members of the patrol each six months and can be reelected
  • Plan and lead patrol meetings and activities.
  • Represent the patrol at all patrol leaders’ council meetings and at the annual program planning conference.
  • Keep patrol members informed of PLC decisions and upcoming troop events.
  • Assign each patrol member a job and help them succeed.
  • Help patrol members advance in rank.
  • Prepare the patrol to take part in all troop activities.
  • Develop patrol spirit by having a patrol flag and cheer
  • Help your patrol earn the National Honor Patrol Award
assistant patrol leader
Assistant Patrol Leader
  • Appointed by the patrol leader
  • Assist the patrol leader in
    • Planning and leading patrol meetings and activities.
    • Keeping patrol members informed.
    • Preparing your patrol to take part in all troop activities.
  • Take weekly attendance of patrol attendance and provide to scribe.
  • Take charge of the patrol in the absence of the patrol leader.
  • Represent the patrol at all patrol leaders' council meetings in the absence of the patrol leader.
  • Help develop patrol spirit.
troop guide
Troop Guide
  • Reports to the SPL and the Assistant Scoutmaster for New Scouts
  • Must be at least First Class rank and serve for 12 months from March to March
  • Becomes a member of the new-Scout patrol and not a member of any other patrol
  • Help new Scouts earn advancement requirements through First Class.
  • Advise patrol leader on his duties and responsibilities at Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) meetings.
  • Attend Patrol Leaders Council (PLC) meetings with the new Scout Patrol Leader.
  • Prevent harassment of new Scouts by older Scouts.
  • Help Assistant Scoutmaster train new Scouts by older Scouts.
  • Guide new Scouts through early troop experiences to help them become comfortable in the troop and the outdoors.
  • Teach basic Scout skills.
quartermaster
Quartermaster
  • Reports to the ASPL for Outdoor Program
  • Keep records on patrol and troop equipment.
  • Keep equipment in good repair.
  • Issue equipment and see that it is returned in good order.
  • Suggest new or replacement items.
  • Work with the troop committee member responsible for equipment.
scribe
Scribe
  • Reports to the ASPL for Communications and the ASM for Communications
  • Attend and keep a log of Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) Meetings.
  • Record attendance at troop functions.
  • Publish news and event information via email and website.
  • Work with the troop committee member responsible for finance, records, and advancement.
historian
Historian
  • Reports to the ASPL for Communications
  • Obtain troop meeting plan from SPL after each troop meeting to file.
  • Ensure written description of each troop event is completed and filed.
  • Ensure photographs are taken at each troop event and publish photos on the website.
  • Take care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities.
  • Keep information about former members of the troop.
librarian
Librarian
  • Reports to the ASPL for Communications
  • Keep records on literature owned by the troop.
  • Add new or replacement items as needed.
  • Research and obtain new information to aid in upcoming troop instruction (merit badges, skill sessions, etc.)
  • Keep books and pamphlets available for borrowing at troop meetings.
  • Keep a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out.
  • Follow up on late returns.
instructor
Instructor
  • Reports to the ASPL for Training
  • Must have at least First Class rank and be proficient in a particular Scouting skill
    • Aquatics
    • First Aid
    • Backpacking
    • Pioneering
    • Nature
    • Orienteering
    • Outdoor Cooking
    • Any merit badge subject
  • Acts as a teaching resource for this skill at troop meetings, campouts, or other troop events
chaplain aide
Chaplain Aide
  • Reports to the ASPL for Outdoor Program and works with the adult Chaplain
  • Keep troop leader appraised of religious holidays when planning activities.
  • Assist Chaplain or religious coordinator in meeting the religious needs of troop members while on activities.
  • Give the closing prayer at each troop meeting
  • Tell Scouts about the religious emblem program of their faith.
  • Help plan for religious observance in troop activities such a Scouts’ Own service during a campout.
  • Assist the Chaplain and Chartered Organization Representative in planning the Scout Sunday service
den chief
Den Chief
  • Must hold First Class rank and have been in the troop for at least one year.
  • Reports to the Den Leader, Cubmaster, and Assistant Scoutmaster for New Scouts
  • Works with a den of Cub Scouts and their adult leaders for at least one year
  • Takes part in den meetings, assisting the den leader with meeting tasks
  • Encourages Cub Scout advancement
  • Acts as a role model for the younger Scouts
junior assistant scoutmaster
Junior Assistant Scoutmaster
  • Must be at least 16 years old and show outstanding leadership skills
  • Follow the guidance of the Scoutmaster in providing support and supervision to the other boy leaders in the troop
oa troop representative
OA Troop Representative
  • Serves as a communication link between the lodge or chapter and the troop by attending the monthly OA meetings.
  • Encourages year round and resident camping in the troop.
  • Encourages older Scout participation in high adventure programs.
  • Encourages Scouts to actively participate in community service projects.
  • Assists with leadership skills training in the troop.
  • Encourages Arrowmen to assume leadership positions in the troop.
  • Encourages Arrowmen in the troop to be active participants in the lodge and/or chapter activities and to seal their membership in the Order by becoming Brotherhood members.