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Early Child Development & Learning Jane Bertrand, Early Childhood Educator. Innovations for Learning & Learners Kelowna, BC May 26, 2006. The long reach of early childhood. Early child development is the first and most critical phase of human growth.

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early child development learning jane bertrand early childhood educator

Early Child Development & LearningJane Bertrand,Early Childhood Educator

Innovations for Learning & LearnersKelowna, BC May 26, 2006

the long reach of early childhood
The long reach of early childhood

Early child development

is the first and

most critical

phase of human growth.

sensitive periods in early brain development
‘Sensitive periods’ in early brain development

Vision

Hearing

Habitual ways of responding

Language

High

Emotionalcontrol

Symbol

Peer social skills

`Numbers’

Sensitivity

Low

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Years

Graph developed by Council for Early Child Development (ref: Nash, 1997; Early Years Study, 1999; Shonkoff, 2000.)

slide4

Literacy – Early Vocabulary Growth

1200

High SES

Middle SES

Cumulative Vocabulary

600

Low SES

0

12

16

20

24

28

32

36

Age - Months

B. Hart & T. Risley, Meaningful Differences in Everyday

Experiences of Young American Children, 1995

estimated cumulative difference in language experiences by 4 years of age
Estimated Cumulative Difference in Language - Experiences by 4 Years of Age

Million

50

Professional

40

Working-class

30

addressed to child

Estimated cumulative words

20

10

Welfare

0

0

12

24

36

48

Age of child in months

slide6

Vulnerable Children Aged 4 to 6 –

NLSCY 1998

40

30

Ontario

Prevalence of Vulnerable Children

20

Rest of Canada

10

0

-1.5

-1.0

-0.5

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

Socioeconomic Status

slide7

Average Economic Family Income

Families with at least one child < 15

< $58, 000

$58,000 – 68,000

$68,000 – 82,000

$82,000 – 100,000

$100,000 – 290,000

Data from 2001 Census

slide8

Measuring Development At School Entry

Percentage of students who scored in the lowest 10th percentile in 2 or more domains

Over 25%

Representation of data from “Toronto Report Card on Children”, Vol 5, Update 2003

slide9

Grade 3 EQAO Assessment of Reading (01-02)

Proportion of students who achieved level 3 or 4

Fewer than 40%

Representation of data from “Toronto Report Card on Children”, Vol 5, Update 2003

slide10

Grade 6 EQAO Assessment of Reading (01-02)

Proportion of students who achieved level 3 or 4

Fewer than 40%

Representation of data from “Toronto Report Card on Children”, Vol 5, Update 2003

slide11

Measuring Readiness for School Learning

Percentage of students who scored in the lowest 10th percentile in 2 or more domains

Less than 10%

Representation of data from “Toronto Report Card on Children”, Vol 5, Update 2003

slide12

Grade 3 EQAO Assessment of Reading (01-02)

Proportion of students who achieved level 3 or 4

Over 70%

Representation of data from “Toronto Report Card on Children”, Vol 5, Update 2003

slide13

Grade 6 EQAO Assessment of Reading (01-02)

Proportion of students who achieved level 3 or 4

Over 70%

Representation of data from “Toronto Report Card on Children”, Vol 5, Update 2003

families matter most
Families Matter Most

The parent-child relationship is paramountand parents know this.

vulnerable children income
Vulnerable Children & Income

Early Years Study, 1999

vulnerable children parenting
Vulnerable Children & Parenting

Early Years Study, 1999

family life
Family Life

Families come in all sizes and shapes.

Mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles & grandparents usually work – part-time, full-time, irregular hours.

Young children and their families live in neighbourhoods & communities.

making a difference
Making a Difference

Parents need support from others to do the best job they can.

___________________

They always have.

slide19

Abecedarian Study – Reading

Effect Size

Primary

Grades

Preschool

Preschool &

Primary Grades

1.2

0.8

0.4

0

Age 8

Age 12

Age 15

Age 21

Age at Testing

early often effective
Early, Often, & Effective

“…What we envision will be a first "tier" program for early child development, as important as the elementary and secondary school system and the post-secondary education system. The system should consist of community-based centres operating at the local level within a provincial framework…”

Early Years StudyMcCain & Mustard, 1999. p. 20

component 1 problem based play
Component 1:Problem-based play

Regular, consistent play provides

rich stimulation

that is absorbed into

core brain development.

component 2 parenting
Component 2: Parenting

The parent/child relationship

is the most powerful influence

on children's

early brain development,

particularly in the first two years.

component 3 resources
Component 3: Resources

Centres can be linked to

home visitingandhome care

satellites, and

early identificationandintervention services.

component 4 prenatal postnatal supports
Component 4:Prenatal & postnatal supports

Access to

childbirth and child development

information, group discussions,

workshops, and neighbourhood and community resources.

component 5 nutrition
Component 5: Nutrition

Optimal

early child development

begins with

adequate nutrition

fromconception

onwards.

component 6 full day full year options
Component 6: Full-day, full-year options

Families require

a range

of care arrangements

including part-time, full-time,

occasional, and respite options.

the integrated early childhood centre

Full-day,

full-year

options

Nutrition

Problem-

based

play

Pre- and

post-natal

supports

Parental

participation

Resources

for

families

Theintegratedearly childhood centre
child care

Problem-

based

play

Nutrition

Full-day,

full-year

options

Child Care
family resource programs parenting centre family place

Problem-

based

play

Nutrition

Parental

participation

Resources

for

families

Family Resource Programs, Parenting Centre, Family Place
slide30

Kindergarten, Preschool, Nursery School

Problem-

based

play

Nutrition

slide31

Co-operative Preschool

Problem-

based

play

Nutrition

Parental

participation

slide32

Head Start

Problem-

based

play

Nutrition

Parental

participation

Resources

for

families

slide33

CAPC/CPNP

Nutrition

Pre- and

post-natal

supports

Parental

participation

Resources

for

families

the integrated model

Full-day,

full-year

options

Nutrition

Problem-

based

play

Pre- and

post-natal

supports

Parental

participation

Resources

for

families

Theintegratedmodel
creating quality environments

Early Childhood

Centre

Creating quality environments

Neighbourhood & schools

Local decision-making

Public policy framework

benefits to children
Benefits to Children
  • Stable environments
  • Coping, competence, health, & well-being
  • Quality of daily life
benefits to parents
Benefits to Parents
  • Increased ability to participate directly in their child’s early learning & development
  • Support to earn a living or pursue further studies
benefits to society
Benefits to Society
  • Cost effective
  • Increased belonging
  • Increased human capital
  • Increased ability to participate in a democracy
slide39

Chaos

Early intervention

Education

Health

Family support

Social services

Public health

Munici-palities

Community services

Local school authorities

Parks & recreation

Parenting

centres

Kindergartens

Preschools

Early Intervention

Child care

local decision making body funds early child development parenting centres

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

Local decision-making body fundsEarly Child Development & Parenting centres

Local

decision-

making

slide41

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

ECD-P

centre

Coherence

Social services

Early intervention

Family support

Health

Policy framework

Education

Local

decision-

making

the bottom line
The Bottom Line

What happens in the early years matters now….

…and later.

sensitive periods in early brain development1
`Sensitive periods’ in early brain development

“Pre-school” years

School years

High

`Numbers’

Peer social skills

Symbol

Sensitivity

Language

Habitual ways of responding

Emotionalcontrol

Vision

Hearing

Low

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

0

Years

Graph developed by Council for Early Child Development (ref: Nash, 1997; Early Years Study, 1999; Shonkoff, 2000.)

rates of return to human capital investment
Rates of Return to Human Capital Investment

Brain Plasticity

Equal at all ages

Most plastic

in early years

Preschool Programs

Education

R

Job Training

Pre-

School

School

Post School

0

Age

R - Rate of return

Pedro Carneiro, James Heckman, Human Capital Policy, 2003

recent developments
Recent Developments

Promising policies & programs emerging across Canada………

provincial government initiatives
Provincial Government Initiatives

Examples:

  • BC Cross-sectoral ECD Coalitions
  • Saskatchewan Learning
  • Healthy Child Manitoba
  • Ontario Best Start
  • Centre de la Petite Enfance, Quebec
  • Nova Scotia Preprimary Pilot Project
toronto first duty
Toronto First Duty

Early learning & care for every child that supports optimal child development & parenting capacity while enabling parents’ to work.

- Informing Best Start

www.toronto.ca/firstduty

tfd the integration continuum
TFD: The Integration Continuum

Collaboration

Communication

Co-existence

Consolidation

Coordination

tfd the elements
TFD: The Elements
  • Decision-making
  • Seamless access
  • Early learning environment
  • Early childhood team
  • Parent participation
  • Public policy framework
integration network project
Integration Network Project

Bridging caring and learning for young children

www.inproject.ca

council for early child development
Council for Early Child Development

www.earlychilddevelopment.ca

to think talk about
To think & talk about…..
  • How do we keep the developing child at the centre of early years’ programs?
  • How do we keep child care in early child development & early learning programs?
  • Is good coordination the enemy of integration?
  • What are the barriers and downsides to a 0 to 6 years ‘first tier’ of public education?