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Ch. 25 Waves. HW 1-16. Ch. 25.1-25.2. 1. A vibration causes a wave and a wave spreads out through space. 2. The period would be 1 second. 3. The pendulum would take 1.5 seconds. 4. A longer period is produced by a longer pendulum

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ch 25 1 25 2
Ch. 25.1-25.2
  • 1. A vibration causes a wave and a wave spreads out through space.
  • 2. The period would be 1 second.
  • 3. The pendulum would take 1.5 seconds.
  • 4. A longer period is produced by a longer pendulum
  • 5. A sine curve represents the periodic motion of a wave and demonstrates simple harmonic motion of the particles that transmit the wave energy.
ch 25
Ch. 25
  • 6. Parts of a wave
    • Amplitude equals the maximum displacement from the point of equilibrium
    • Crest is the high point on a wave
    • Trough is the low point on a wave
    • Wavelength is the distance from one point to the next identical point on a wave

7. Period is the time it takes for one complete cycle of a wave (seconds); the frequency is the number of waves that pass a single point per unit time or the number of vibrations per second (Hertz)

ch 251
Ch. 25
  • 8. No. The medium does not move along with the wave. The wave energy passes through the medium and is carried by the disturbance that travels through.
  • 9. The speed of a wave is calculated by multiplying frequency by wavelength.
  • 10. As the frequency of a sound increases, the wavelength decreases (inverse relationship)
ch 252
Ch. 25
  • 11. Difference between transverse and longitudinal waves
    • A transverse wave is produced by a vibration that is perpendicular to wave travel.
    • A longitudinal wave is produced by a vibration that occurs parallel to or is in the same direction as wave travel.
ch 253
Ch. 25
  • 12. Wave interference occurs when two or more waves share the same space and the amplitude of the wave either increases or decreases.
    • Constructive interference: when the interference of two or more waves produce a wave with a larger amplitude
    • Destructive interference: when the interference of two or more waves produce a wave with a smaller amplitude (sometimes the waves will completely cancel each other out)
  • 13. Interference is a property shared by all types of waves.
ch 254
Ch. 25
  • 14. A standing wave is a wave that appears to stay in one place. A standing wave forms when two waves identical in frequency, wavelength and amplitude moving in opposite directions interfere (incident and reflected waves)
  • Antinodes form by constructive interference (waves build in phase) and nodes form by destructive interference (waves cancel out completely and are out-of-phase)
ch 255
Ch. 25
  • 15. The Doppler Effect is an apparent shift in frequency caused by the motion of a source of a wave relative to an observer or vice-versa. As the source of a wave approaches a receiver, the receiver will encounter only an increase in wave frequency.
  • 16. The Doppler Effect occurs for all waves, but is most recognizable for sound waves and light waves.
slide9
The Parts of a Wave

25.2Wave Description

A weight attached to a spring undergoes simple harmonic motion.

A marking pen attached to the bob traces a sine curve on a sheet of paper that is moving horizontally at constant speed.

A sine curve is a pictorial representation of a wave.