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Elbow Orthopaedic Tests. Medial Aspect (Ulnar Nerve). Medial Epicondyle. Ulnar Collateral Ligament. Lateral Epicondyle. Radial Collateral Ligament Annular Ligament. Olecranon Process and Bursa. Triceps. Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow).

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lateral epicondylitis tennis elbow
Lateral Epicondylitis(Tennis Elbow)
  • Lateral epicondylitis is a repetitive strain injury of the common extensor tendon at thelateral epicondyle of the humerus.
  • Symptoms persist because of constant traction movement of the wrist and hand.
lateral epicondylitis tennis elbow2
Lateral Epicondylitis(Tennis Elbow)
  • Clinical Signs and Symptoms
    • Local lateral elbow pain
    • Weakness of the forearm
cozen s test
Cozen’s Test
  • Procedure: Patient seated. Stabilize forearm. Patient should make a fist and extend it against resistance.
  • Rationale: The tendons that extend the wrist attach to the lateral epicondyle. Forcing the extended wrist into flexion will exacerbate the pain if the tendons are inflamed.
mill s test
Mill’s Test
  • Procedure: Patient seated. Instruct the patient to pronate the arm and flex the wrist. Then, instruct them to supinate against resistance.
  • Rationale: The supinator tendon is attached to the lateral epicondyle. If pain is elicited, suspect inflammation of the lateral epicondyle.
medial epicondylitis golfer s elbow
Medial Epicondylitis(Golfer’s Elbow)
  • Medial epicondylitis is a repetitive injury of the common flexor tendon at the medial epiconsyle of the humerus.
  • Symptoms persist due to constant traction and movement of the wrist and hand.
medial epicondylitis golfer s elbow1
Medial Epicondylitis(Golfer’s Elbow)
  • Clinical Signs and Symptoms
    • Local medial elbow pain
    • Weakness of the forearm
golfer s elbow test
Golfer’s Elbow test
  • Procedure: Patient seated. Instruct the patient to extend the elbow and supinate the hand. Then, instruct the patient to flex the wrist against resistance.
  • Rationale: The tendons that flex the wrist are attached to the medial epicondyle. If pain is elicited, suspect inflammation of the medial epicondyle.
ligamentous instability
Ligamentous Instability
  • Ligamentous instability of the elbow is relatively uncommon.
  • The injury may be caused by forced elbow hyperextension, forced abduction of the extended arm, or forced adduction of the extended arm.
ligamentous instability1
Ligamentous Instability
  • Forced adduction will damage the radial collateral ligament.
  • Forced abduction will damage the ulnar collateral ligament.
ligamentous instability2
Ligamentous Instability
  • Clinical Signs and Symptoms
    • Medial or Lateral elbow pain
    • Local swelling
adduction stress test
Adduction Stress Test
  • Procedure: Patient seated. Stabilize the medial arm and place adduction pressure on the patient’s lateral forearm.
  • Rationale: Adduction pressure will stress the radial collateral ligament. Gapping and pain indicate radial collateral ligament instability.
abduction stress test
Abduction Stress Test
  • Procedure: Patient seated. Stabilize the lateral arm and place abduction pressure on the medial forearm.
  • Rationale: Abduction pressure on the medial forearm applies stress to the ulnar collateral ligament. Gapping and pain indicate ulnar collateral ligament instability.
neuropathy compression syndromes
Neuropathy / Compression Syndromes
  • Neuropathy and compression syndromes of the elbow are peripheral neurological disorders.
  • They are caused by trauma, overuse, arthritis, and postural considerations.
neuropathy compression syndromes1
Neuropathy / Compression Syndromes
  • Paresthesia and weakness of the forearm and/or hand.
  • The ulnar nerve is most often affected.
  • Compression occurs in the groove between the olecranon process and the medial epicondyle or the cubital tunnel.
neuropathy compression syndromes2
Neuropathy / Compression Syndromes
  • Clinical Signs and Symptoms
    • Forearm and/or hand paresthesia
    • Forearm and/or hand weakness
tinel s sign
Tinel’s Sign
  • Procedure: Patient seated. Tap the ulnar nerve in the groove between the olecranon process and the medial epicondyle with a neurological reflex hammer.
  • Rationale: If pain is elicited, it suggests a neuritis or neuroma of the ulnar nerve.
causes of ulnar nerve damage
Causes of Ulnar Nerve Damage
  • Excessive use or repetitive motion injuries.
  • Arthritis of the elbow joint.
  • Cubital tunnel compression, between the heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle.
  • Postural habits that compress the nerve, such as sleeping with elbows flexed and hands under head.
  • Recurrent nerve subluxations or dislocations.