Employers should NOT use social networking sites to judge their employees/potential employees - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Employers should NOT use social networking sites to judge their employees/potential employees PowerPoint Presentation
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Employers should NOT use social networking sites to judge their employees/potential employees

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Employers should NOT use social networking sites to judge their employees/potential employees
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Employers should NOT use social networking sites to judge their employees/potential employees

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  1. Employers should NOT use social networking sites to judge their employees/potential employees By Peter Nguyen Section 006

  2. Some facts about this topic • Since Social Networking has been a major part of a lot of people’s lives, employers see it as a great tool to screen their potential employees. • Employers see what their potential employees do in their personal time and judge on whether to hire the potential employees or not. • Employers also uses it to see what their hired employees would do in their personal lives and judge whether to fire them or not.

  3. This is the percentages of Employers’ response to the question: “Do You Use Social Networking Sites to Screen Prospective Employees?”

  4. These are the answers that Employers replied to the question: “During which phase of the hiring process do you look at social networking sites to screen prospective employees?” • 47% said after receiving an application • 27% said after initial conversation with the potential employee • 15% said after detailed conversations with the potential employee • 7% said that they don’t screen potential employees through social media • 4% said right before making an offer

  5. This is the percentages of what employers answered when asked: “Have You Ever Rejected a Candidate Because of What You Saw About Them on a Social Networking Site?”

  6. When the employers were asked Why were those candidates rejected, they answered… • Inappropriate photos • Inappropriate comments • Content about them drinking • Content about them using drugs • Negative comments about a previous employer • Demonstrated poor communication skills • Discriminatory comments • Lied about their qualifications • Shared confidential information from a previous employer

  7. Why shouldn’t employers use social networking sites to judge their employees/Potential employees? • Social Networking sites are a place where people feel like they can unwind from the real world to relax and have fun. • People have other hobbies than just working, why can’t they have the freedom to express it on their social networking site. • People are different in the work environment than in the relaxed environment.

  8. If employers were to judge their employees/potential employees depending on their social media…

  9. How social Networking sites might not work for employers • People with the same name could be searched and employers would assume it’s this one person when it was really the other person • For example, Facebook has a page dedicated to a guy with the same name as me that wrote hilarious essays with made up facts. • Click here to go to the page and even read the essays.

  10. Another reason how social Networking sites might not work for employers • If employees or potential employees are searched for on Social Networking sites without permission to determine whether that employer would hire them or not, it would not be liable under the Fair Credit Reporting Act • Employees and potential employees can also report that the employer is breaking some type of employee privacy law • Another common report is that the employer is discriminating

  11. There should be laws against employers using social Media sites to judge their employees/potential employees • California has already signed into law, two bills that forbids employers, and even colleges, from demanding applicants’ Social Media sites’ logins or any related material. • Bill AB-1844 bars employers from demanding social media-related material • Bill SB-1349 is the same, but for colleges and potential students

  12. References • Nathan, James. "How Employers Screen Job Applicants Using Social Media." How Employers Screen Job Applicants Using Social Media. Recruiting Blogs, 13 Mar. 2012. Web. 12 Nov. 2012. <http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/how-employers-screen-job-applicants-using-social-media>. • Wu, James. "Employers Be Cautious Using Social Media To Screen Job Applicants." Windmill Networking Employers Be Cautious Using Social Media To Screen Job Applicants Comments. WindMill Networking, 06 Apr. 2012. Web. 12 Nov. 2012. <http://windmillnetworking.com/2012/04/06/employers-be-cautious-using-social-media-to-screen-job-applicants/>. • Johnson, Steve. "Those Party Photos Could Cost You a Job." Chicagotribune.com. Chicago Tribune, 17 Jan. 2012. Web. 12 Nov. 2012. <http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/tribu/ct-tribu-facebook-job-dangers-20120117,0,1257938.column>.

  13. References Continued • Endler, Michael. "InformationWeek: The Business Value of Technology." Informationweek. InformationWeek Security, 01 Oct. 2012. Web. 12 Nov. 2012. <http://www.informationweek.com/security/privacy/california-passes-tough-social-media-pri/240008206>. • McHale, Robert. "Using Facebook To Screen Potential Hires Can Get You Sued." Fast Company. Fast Company, 19 July 2012. Web. 12 Nov. 2012. <http://www.fastcompany.com/1843142/using-facebook-screen-potential-hires-can-get-you-sued>.