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Animation for Education Brendan Routledge E2BN Consultant What is animation? Animation is the process by which we see still pictures MOVE Each picture is shot on film one at a time and is shown at the rate of 25 pictures per second making the pictures appear to move Why use animation?

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slide1

Animation for Education

Brendan Routledge

E2BN Consultant

slide2

What is animation?

Animation is the process by which we see still pictures MOVE

Each picture is shot on film one at a time and is shown at the rate of

25 pictures per second making the pictures appear to move

slide3

Why use animation?

Increase in creativity and imagination – literacy/story done through

animation offers great opportunity for discussion

Great opportunity to develop interesting approaches to ‘multimodal’

writing – better than PowerPoint!

Huge increase in motivation esp. for boy’s writing

Chance to develop personal / social skills / teamwork

Chance to develop ICT skills in an exciting, interesting context

slide4

Animation techniques

  • There are four basic techniques used in animation
  • Drawn animation
  • Cut-out animation
  • Computer animation or computer generated imagery (CGI)
  • Stop-motion or model animation
slide5

Drawn animation

This covers any form where one drawing is replaced by another in a

sequence. Each drawing is slightly different from the one before. It

works the way a flip book does. These animated films are made up

of thousands of drawings which are shown on screen very quickly

one after the other

Very labour intensive

Looks great and is very easy

slide6

Cut-out animation

This covers any form of animation where cut-out shapes are

moved around or replaced by other cut-outs. Flat objects like

buttons, matchsticks and string can also be used in this form

of animation. Cut-outs can also be laid on top of drawings

Can appear stiff & awkward

Quick and easy to create

slide7

Computer Generated Imagery (CGI)

This refers to the drawing of three-dimensional models and sets on the

computer. Images can be scanned into the computer using digital photography

or made within the computer itself. Human characters can be built from clay

whilst sets and furnishings are modelled using design systems similar to

architects drawings. These models are scanned into the computer as

wire-frame models which are gradually built up into a coloured and textured

form which will finally be recorded onto film

Expensive

Toy Story = $30 million

Creates very lifelike animation

slide8

Stop-motion animation

This involves the filming of puppets or any form of three-dimensional models.

The materials used could include plasticine, clay or wire - in fact anything

that can be bent or formed into another shape. The puppets are positioned

and filmed before being moved ever so slightly and filmed again.

These shots are put together as a piece of film and will give the impression

of the models moving

Extremely time-consuming –

Nick Park = 3 seconds per day

Same models can be used

again and again

slide9

Stop-motion animation

How we created ‘A Saint’s Revenge’

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Stop-motion animation

How we created ‘A Saint’s Revenge’

Write a new story or access an existing story – a myth or legend or

folktale from your area – e.g. E2BN Myths & Legends site

Amend your story – create a version suitable for filming

Create a storyboard outlining the key scenes of the film – shot types

Produce a list of characters and props which need to be made

Create the characters, props and backgrounds

Film the story, scene by scene

Post-production work – voice-over, titling, music

slide11

Stop-motion animation

The story

See http://myths.e2bn.net – use the text of one of the stories and

amend it create version which can be filmed

slide12

Stop-motion animation

Create a storyboard outlining the key scenes of the film – shot types

Produce a list of characters and props which need to be made

slide13

Stop-motion animation

Create the characters, props and backgrounds

Use oiled plasticine rather than clay – remains

workable for much longer

Start with basic shapes- spheres, cylinder, cubes

Make characters approx 15cm/6 ins tall

Keep legs short to support body and head

Consider how to create expressions – eyes, mouth,

hair – make them moveable and removable

Make two sets of eyes, mouth etc

Shoot against plain backgrounds or large images

slide14

Stop-motion animation

Film the story, scene by scene

Many software titles available including DigiBlue

and Xipster Instant Animator

Can use simple and cheap webcam

Take 1 shot per movement or 2-3 for slower action

Start and end with 15-25 images with no action

Include occasional pause – 8 – 10 shots

Blinking – take eyes off, 2 shots, eyes back on

Keep movements very small

slide15

Stop-motion animation

Post-production work – voice-over, titling, music

Post-production work can be done in Windows

MovieMaker

Add titles at beginning and credits at the end

Use text to move the story on – silent movie style!

Record the voice-over in sections

Add sound effects if needed – http://myths.e2bn.net

Add intro music if needed – http://audio.e2bn.net

slide16

Contacts & Further Help

Film Education – http://www.filmeducation.org

Anim8ed - http://www.anim8ed.org.uk/

Animation for Education - http://www.animationforeducation.co.uk

British Film Institute – http://www.bfi.org.uk

Tech4Learning – http://www.tech4learning.com

Myths & Legends – http://myths.e2bn.net

E2BN Gallery – http://gallery.e2bn.net

Audio Networks – http://audio.e2bn.net

Xipster available from http://www.advisorymatters.co.uk

Oiled plasticine from Newclay Products Ltd. – http://www.newclay.co.uk

E2BN – http://www.e2bn.org

Brendan Routledge – brendan@suffolkeducationconsultants.net

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Animation for Education

Brendan Routledge

E2BN Consultant