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Goals Introduce Group Policy Introduce the types of Group Policy settings and the GPMC Identify the role of a Group Policy at startup and logon Plan a Group Policy implementation Create a Group Policy Object Delegate control for a Group Policy Object (Skill 1) Introducing Group Policy

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slide1

Goals

  • Introduce Group Policy
  • Introduce the types of Group Policy settings and the GPMC
  • Identify the role of a Group Policy at startup and logon
  • Plan a Group Policy implementation
  • Create a Group Policy Object
  • Delegate control for a Group Policy Object
slide2

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy

  • An administrator must monitor user and computer settings regularly to make sure that they conform to the corporate standards
  • Group Policy is the primary Active Directory tool used by administrators to set the standard behavior for users’ desktops and to enforce those requirements
slide3

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy (2)

  • Using Group Policies
    • Administrators define the work environment settings once
    • The settings are applicable regardless of the user’s location
    • Administrators can apply GPOs to various Active Directory containers to implement rules at various levels
    • To do this, you simply link the GPO to one of these containers
slide4

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy (3)

  • Group Policy is also referred to as a Group Policy Object (GPO)
    • A GPO is a storage place for a collection of Group Policy settings that enable an administrator to control various aspects of the computing environment
    • All Group Policy settings are stored in a GPO along with the properties associated with the objects in the Active Directory store
slide5

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy (4)

  • Policy settings for sites, domains, and organizational units are stored in GPOs
  • To create a GPO for a domain or an OU
    • Use the Active Directory Users and Computers console
    • Use the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC)
slide6

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy (5)

  • To create a GPO for a site
    • Use the Active Directory Sites and Services console
    • Use the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC), which combines the functionality of various consoles
      • Active Directory Users and Computers
      • Active Directory Sites and Services
      • ACL Editor
      • Delegation Wizard
      • Resultant Set of Policy tool
slide7

(Skill 1)

Figure 9-1 Download the GPMC

slide8

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy (6)

  • Two types of GPOs
    • Local GPOs are stored on each Windows Server 2003 computer
    • Active Directory-based GPOs
      • Are stored on a domain controller in the Active Directory environment
      • Are replicated to all domain controllers in the domain
slide9

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy (7)

  • GPO is made up of two parts
    • Group Policy Container (GPC)
      • GPO attributes
      • Extensions
      • Version information
    • Group Policy Template (GPT)
      • Collection of folders
      • Stored on each Windows Server 2003 domain controller
slide10

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy (8)

  • Group Policy Container (GPC)
    • An Active Directory component that contains GPO attributes, extensions, and version information
    • Domain controllers use this information to make sure they are using the most recent version of the GPO and to apply permissions to the GPO
    • For each GPO, there is a GPC container stored in the System\Policies folder in the Active Directory Users and Computers console
    • Each GPC container is identified by the Globally Unique Identifier (GUID) for the GPO
slide11

(Skill 1)

Figure 9-2 GPC containers in the Active Directory Users and Computers console

slide12

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy (9)

  • Group Policy Template (GPT)
    • A collection of folders stored on each Windows Server 2003 domain controller in the folder %Systemroot%\SYSVOL\sysvol\<domain_name>\Policies
    • For each GPO, a folder hierarchy composed of the physical files and settings required by the GPO is automatically created
    • These settings are applied to the Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003, and Windows XP clients on a network
slide13

(Skill 1)

Introducing Group Policy (10)

  • Group Policy Template (GPT)
    • Contains all of the Registry entries, as well as the associated files and folder required to implement the various GPO functions
    • Like the GPC container, the GPT folder is identified by the GUID for the GPO
slide14

(Skill 1)

Figure 9-3 The Add Standalone Snap-in dialog box

slide15

(Skill 1)

Figure 9-4 The Group Policy Wizard

slide16

(Skill 1)

Figure 9-5 The Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box

slide17

(Skill 1)

Figure 9-6 Configuring Local Computer Policy

slide18

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC

  • Group Policy settings are divided into two categories
    • Computer Configuration settings
      • These settings refer to Group Policies that apply to computers, regardless of what user logs on
      • These settings apply to a computer during the initialization of the operating system
    • User Configuration settings
      • These settings refer to Group Policies for users, regardless of what computer the users log on to
      • These settings apply at user logon
slide19

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (2)

  • Both Computer Configuration settings and User Configuration settings contain three main containers that include a number of related policies
    • Software Settings
    • Windows Settings
    • Administrative Templates
slide20

(Skill 2)

Figure 9-7 The three main categories of User Configuration

and Computer Configuration Group Policy

slide21

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (3)

  • Software Settings
    • This configuration setting node is used to determine the applications distributed to computers or users via a GPO
    • You use Software Settings to assign applications to computers or to assign or publish applications to users
    • If you use the Computer Configuration node to assign an application to a computer, the application appears on the Start menu for all computers in the domain, site, or OU
slide22

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (4)

  • Software Settings
    • If you publish an application to users, it appears in the Add/Remove Programs Wizard for all users in the domain, site, or OU
    • If you assign an application to users using the User Configuration node
      • It displays on the Start menu for all users in the site, domain, or OU
      • It does not install until the user invokes it
      • This functionality is called “advertising”
slide23

(Skill 2)

Figure 9-8 Software installation

slide24

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (5)

  • Windows Settings
    • In the Computer Configuration node, the Windows Settings node contains the Scripts and Security Settings extensions
      • Scripts extension: Used to specify startup and shutdown scripts for computers, as well as logon and logoff scripts for users on a network
      • Security Settings extension: Used by administrators to configure security settings for the local computer or for a GPO
slide25

(Skill 2)

Figure 9-9 Scripts

slide26

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (6)

  • Windows Settings
    • In the User Configuration node, the Windows Settings node has five folders
      • Remote Installation Services
      • Scripts
      • Security Settings
      • Internet Explorer Maintenance
      • Folder Redirection
slide27

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (7)

  • Windows Settings
    • Remote Installation Services Group Policies control the RIS installation options available to the user when the Client Installation Wizard is initiated
    • Folder Redirection Group Policies relocate special folders, such as My Documents, Start Menu, or Desktop
    • You can redirect these folders from their default locations in a user profile to alternate locations
slide28

(Skill 2)

Figure 9-10 Types of Folder Redirection policies

slide29

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (8)

  • Administrative Templates
    • Contains all Registry-based Group Policy settings, including settings for Windows Components, System, and Network
    • Group Policy settings for Printers are available only in the Computer Configuration container
    • Other settings, including Start Menu and Taskbar, Desktop, Control Panel, and Shared Folders are available only in the User Configuration container
slide30

(Skill 2)

Figure 9-11 Types of Administrative Templates policies

slide31

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (9)

  • Group Policy Management Console (GPMC)
    • Comprehensive tool for Group Policy administration for Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 domains
    • Provides administrators with the ability to backup, restore, import, and copy/paste GPOs, as well as to create, delete, and rename them
    • Use it to link GPOs and search for GPOs
    • Use it to delegate Group Policy-related features and for policy-related permission for sites, domains, and OUs
slide32

(Skill 2)

Figure 9-12 Group Policy Objects in the GPMC

slide33

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (10)

  • GPMC installation requirements
    • Requires Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP Service Pack 1 or above computers
    • To run the tool on Windows XP Service pack 1 or above computers, you must also install the QFE update Q326469 and the Microsoft .NET Framework
    • The domain controllers must all be running Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 or later
slide34

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (11)

  • GPMC requirements for domain controllers
    • GPMC requires that all LDAP communications be signed and encrypted
    • To access domain controllers in an external forest, they must be running Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 or later
    • If you want to access domain controllers in an external forest that are not yet running Service Pack 3 or later, edit the Registry on the computer running GPMC to relax LDAP signing and encryption requirements
slide35

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (12)

  • System Policies
    • Used in Windows 9.x and Windows NT to change Registry settings and to control the user environment
    • Still useful for managing Windows 9x and NT computers
      • Windows 9.x: you can run the Poledit.exe version on the Windows 98 installation CD to create config.pol files
      • Windows NT 4.0 Workstation or Server: use the Windows NT System Policy Editor or the Poledit.exe included with Windows Server 2003 to create config.pol files
slide36

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (13)

  • System Policies
    • System Policy Editor (Poledit.exe) has been mostly replaced by Group Policy in Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003
    • If you create policy settings with Windows Server 2003 version, you cannot edit them using the Windows NT 4.0 version
slide37

(Skill 2)

Figure 9-13 The System Policy Editor

slide38

(Skill 2)

Introducing the Types of Group Policy Settings

and the GPMC (14)

  • Each of the Group Policy Object Editor extensions is a MMC snap-in extension itself
    • All Group Policy setting folders are loaded by default when Group Policy Object Editor is started
    • You can create custom consoles for each of these extensions
  • Use the Microsoft Management Consolefolder in the User Configuration\Administrative Templates container in the Group Policy Object Editor to apply these policies
slide39

(Skill 2)

Figure 9-14 The Microsoft Management Console folder

slide40

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon

  • The role of a Group Policy begins when a computer starts up or when a user logs on
  • During startup and logon, both Computer Configuration and User Configuration settings are applied in a specific sequence
slide41

(Skill 3)

Figure 9-15 The sequence in which Computer Configuration and User Configuration settings are applied

slide42

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (2)

  • Every computer has one GPO that is stored locally
  • This local Group Policy Object (LPGO) is applied first
  • The processing sequence becomes very important when dealing with multiple policies
    • If there are no conflicts between the policies, all settings from all of the policies apply
    • However, if a conflict occurs the policy to apply last wins
slide43

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (3)

  • Sequence in which Group Policy settings are processed
    • Local GPO
    • Site GPOs
    • Domain GPOs
    • OU GPOs (LSDOU)
slide44

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (4)

  • If more than one GPO is linked
    • The policies are processed in reverse order for each individual container
    • This is done so that the policy that is considered to be the most important is displayed at the top of the list of all GPOs applied to a particular container
slide45

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (5)

  • Like files and folders, Group Policies are also inherited from parent containers to child containers
  • You can specifically set a separate Group Policy setting for a child container to override the settings it inherits from its parent container
  • It is extremely importantto note that like OU structures, Group Policies do notflow between domains
slide46

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (6)

  • Group Policy applied to a parent domain
    • Does notapply to its child domain or domains
    • The only container that can apply Group Policies to multiple domains is the site container
  • Group Policy applied to a site
    • Affects allusers and computers in the site, regardless of domain
    • For this reason, you must be an Enterprise Admin in order to apply a Group Policy to a site
slide47

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (7)

  • Exceptions to the order in which GPOs are processed
    • If a computer belongs to a workgroup, it processes only local GPOs
    • You can modify the default behavior using the Block Inheritance option, but this can make GPO administration more complicated and it should be used sparingly
    • You can block inheritance for GPO links for an entire domain, for all domain controllers, or for an OU
slide48

(Skill 3)

Figure 9-16 Blocking Inheritance for the GPO links for all domain controllers

slide49

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (8)

  • Exceptions to the order in which GPOs are processed
    • The default order for processing Group policy settings is also affected when you set the GPO link to Enforced
      • Policy settings in the GPO link take precedence over child object settings
      • Gives the parent GPO link precedence so that the default behavior does not apply (formerly called the No Override option)
      • GPO administration is more complex
      • GPOs cannot have their inheritance blocked
slide50

(Skill 3)

Figure 9-17 The Enforced setting

slide51

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (9)

  • Exceptions to the order in which GPOs are processed
    • If Block Inheritance option is set for a domain or OU
      • The GPOs above that point in the structure do not affect users or computers in that structure; they are blocked
      • If there is a conflict between Enforced and Block Inheritance, Enforced always wins
slide52

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (10)

  • Exceptions to the order in which GPOs are processed
    • You can disable a GPO link to block that GPO from being applied for the selected site, domain, or OU
      • Disables the GPO only for the selected container object; it does not disable the GPO itself
      • If the GPO is linked to other sites, domains, or OUs, they continue to process the GPO as long as their links are enabled
      • Processing is enabled for all GPO links by default
      • To disable a GPO link, right-click it and select the Link Enabled command (a check mark indicates it is enabled)
slide53

(Skill 3)

Figure 9-18 The Link Enabled command

slide54

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (11)

  • Exceptions to the order in which GPOs are processed
    • When GPOs are linked to the same container, policies are evaluated based on the link order set on the Linked Group Policy Objects tab for the container object
      • The policy settings in the GPO with the lowest link order (Link Order 1) are processed last
      • Link Order 1 has the highest precedence and is used to settle a conflict
      • Use the arrow buttons to change the link order
slide55

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (12)

  • Exceptions to the order in which GPOs are processed
    • Group Policies are never applied to Windows NT, 95, 98, or Windows Me computers
slide56

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (13)

  • User Group Policy loopback processing mode
    • This policy is referred to as the loopback feature
    • Enforced when both the user account and the computer account are members of a Windows 2000 or later domain
    • You can configure loopback so that the User Configuration settings in GPOs are applied to every user logging on to that computer
slide57

(Skill 3)

Figure 9-19 The User Group Policy loopback processing mode policy

slide58

(Skill 3)

Identifying the Role of a Group Policy at Startup and Logon (14)

  • User Group Policy loopback processing mode
    • In Merge mode, the Computer Configuration GPO settings are appended to the default list of GPOs
    • In Replace mode, the User Configuration GPO settings are completely replaced by the Computer Configuration GPO settings
slide59

(Skill 3)

Figure 9-20 Merge or Replace mode

slide60

(Skill 4)

Planning a Group Policy Implementation

  • After you decide on a Group Policy setting design, you devise a Group Policy implementation strategy
  • Factors to consider
    • Location of GPOs
    • Delegation of authority
    • Organization structure
slide61

(Skill 4)

Planning a Group Policy Implementation (2)

  • Types of Group Policy implementation strategies
    • Centralized GPO design
      • An organization’s network is maintained by a small number of large GPOs
    • Decentralized GPO design
      • Uses separate GPOs for specific policy settings
slide62

(Skill 4)

Planning a Group Policy Implementation (3)

  • Types of Group Policy implementation strategies
    • Functional Role (or Team Design)
      • Functional roles of users are considered to apply Group Policies
      • Steps to implement this strategy
        • Create an OU structure that corresponds to the actual team structure of your organization
        • Create a customized GPO for each OU that is tailored to the needs of the OU
slide63

(Skill 4)

Planning a Group Policy Implementation (4)

  • Types of Group Policy implementation strategies
    • Delegation with Central Control Design or Distributed Control Design
      • Based on delegating administrative control over OUs to various administrators in an organization
      • When you implement this strategy, you maintain centralized control while distributing managerial control to a number of OU administrators
slide64

(Skill 4)

Planning a Group Policy Implementation (5)

  • Regardless of which approach (or combination) you choose, it is important to try to avoid using certain tools and options
    • Enforced and Block Inheritance options
    • Filtering
  • Troubleshooting GPOs can be very difficult when these tools are used
slide65

(Skill 5)

Creating a Group Policy Object

  • When you install Active Directory on your network, two GPOs are created automatically
    • Default Domain Policy, which is linked to the domain
    • Default Domain Controllers Policy, which is linked to the Domain Controllers OU
  • You can use these policies to assign standard settings to the domain and the domain controllers in a domain, respectively
slide66

(Skill 5)

Creating a Group Policy Object (2)

  • GPOs can be linked to sites, domains, and OUs
    • To link a GPO to a site, use the Active Directory Sites and Services console or the GPMC
    • To link GPOs to domains and OUs, use either the Active Directory Users and Computers console or the GPMC
slide67

(Skill 5)

Creating a Group Policy Object (3)

  • You can create a stand-alone GPO console for a GPO and access it directly from the All Programs/Administrative Tools menu
  • Steps to create a GPO console
    • Open Add Standalone Snap-in dialog box from an MMC console
    • Select Group Policy Object Editor from the list of available snap-ins
slide68

(Skill 5)

Creating a Group Policy Object (4)

  • Steps to create a GPO console
    • Click the Browse button in the Group Policy Wizard
    • In the Browse for a Group Policy Object dialog box, select the GPO for which you want to create a console

The selected GPO name is added to the Group Policy Object text box on the Select Group Policy Object screen in the wizard

    • From the File menu, save the console for the GPO to make it available on the All Programs/Administrative Tools menu
slide69

(Skill 5)

Figure 9-21 Creating a GPO

slide70

(Skill 5)

Figure 9-22 The New GPO dialog box

slide71

(Skill 5)

Figure 9-23 New Group Policy Object in a domain

slide72

(Skill 6)

Delegating Control for a Group Policy Object

  • Assign permissions to delegate administrative control over a GPO on the Delegation tab in the GPMC
    • There are three standard permissions you can assign to a GPO
    • However, five permission levels display on the Delegation tab
    • Each of these permission levels represents a combination of Active Directory permissions
slide73

(Skill 6)

Delegating Control for a Group Policy Object (2)

  • To delegate permissions for a GPO, you must have the Edit settings, delete, and modify security permission for the GPO
  • To view the permissions for groups with custom permissions or to set custom permissions, click the Advanced button to open the ACL Editor for the GPO (<GPO_name> Security Settings dialog box)
slide74

(Skill 6)

Delegating Control for a Group Policy Object (3)

  • You must assign the Edit settings, delete, and modify security permission to at least one group or user for each GPO
  • If there is only one user or group with this permission level, you cannot remove this user or group
  • Permissions inherited from parent containers cannot be removed
slide75

(Skill 6)

Delegating Control for a Group Policy Object (4)

  • To change the permissions assigned to a user or group
    • Right-click the user or group in the Groups and users box
    • Select from the three standard permissions on the context menu
  • You can also use the Remove command to remove a user or group from the Groups and users box
slide76

(Skill 6)

Figure 9-24 Setting GPO permissions

slide77

(Skill 6)

Figure 9-25 The Delegation tab in the GPMC