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A Call for Women’s Rights

A Call for Women’s Rights

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A Call for Women’s Rights

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  1. A Call for Women’s Rights Chapter 15, Section 3 • Why did some women call for equal rights in the 1800s? • What goals were set at the Seneca Falls Convention? • How did women win new educational opportunities?

  2. Seeking Equal Rights for Women Chapter 15, Section 3 Reasons people sought equal rights for women in the mid-1800s • Women could not vote or hold office. • When a woman married, all of her property became her husband’s property. • A working woman’s wages belonged to her husband. • A husband had the right to hit his wife. • The abolitionist movement made people aware that women, too, lacked full social and political rights.

  3. Women’s Rights Leaders This former slave was a spellbinding speaker. She spoke out against slavery and also for women’s rights. Sojourner Truth Lucretia Mott This Quaker woman used her organizing skills to set up petition drives across the North. Elizabeth Cady Stanton Stanton joined Mott and other Americans at the World Antislavery Convention in London. Back at home in the United States, she and Mott organized a convention to draw attention to women’s problems. Susan B. Anthony Traveled across the country, speaking tirelessly for women’s rights. Seeking Equal Rights for Women Chapter 15, Section 3

  4. Goals of the Seneca Falls Convention Chapter 15, Section 3 Seneca Falls Convention—meeting held in 1848 at Seneca Falls, New York, to discuss the problems that women faced. It was the start of the women’s rights movement, an organization campaign for equal rights. Goals • The convention issued a Declaration of Sentiments, which proclaimed, “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal.” • Resolutions demanded equality at work, at school, and at church. • A resolution demanding women’s right to vote passed narrowly.

  5. New Educational Opportunities for Women Chapter 15, Section 3 Reformers said that education was a key to women’s equality. Reformers opened new schools for women. • Emma Willard opened a high school for girls in Troy, New York. • Mary Lyon opened Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in Massachusetts, the first women’s college in the United States. A few men’s colleges began to admit women. • Elizabeth Blackwell attended medical school at Geneva College in New York. • Maria Mitchell became a noted astronomer. • Sarah Josepha Hale became editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book. • Antoinette Blackwell was the first American woman ordained a minister.

  6. Section 3 Assessment Chapter 15, Section 3 The women’s rights movement demanded that women a) work outside the home. b) be given equal rights at work, at school, and at church. c) be given certain rights that men did not have. d) give up their husband’s names. Before the mid-1800s no woman in the United States a) learned to read. b) studied dancing and drawing. c) went to college. d) learned to care for a family. Want to connect to the American History link for this section? Click here.

  7. Section 3 Assessment Chapter 15, Section 3 The women’s rights movement demanded that women a) work outside the home. b) be given equal rights at work, at school, and at church. c) be given certain rights that men did not have. d) give up their husband’s names. Before the mid-1800s no woman in the United States a) learned to read. b) studied dancing and drawing. c) went to college. d) learned to care for a family. Want to connect to the American History link for this section? Click here.