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Practical Matters. PROX CARDS? WEB PAGE: final project examples. SONIC VISUALIZER / AMADEUS II/ HOME SETUPS? - Listening practice every class until mid-term. 1/2 GROUPS FOR NEXT WEEK Alphabetically (see attendance sheet) ProTools lab in CJ 1.327. MINIDISCS FOR THE MINIDISC WORKSHOP

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slide1

Practical Matters

PROX CARDS?

WEB PAGE: final project examples

  • SONIC VISUALIZER / AMADEUS II/ HOME SETUPS?
    • - Listening practice every class until mid-term
  • 1/2 GROUPS FOR NEXT WEEK
    • Alphabetically (see attendance sheet)
    • ProTools lab in CJ 1.327
  • MINIDISCS FOR THE MINIDISC WORKSHOP
    • Everyone must have at least one disc
    • Singles in CJ bookstore
    • 3-packs in Future Shop
    • Boxes of 5 in audio-video supply stores, e.g. Montreal Audio-Video, 2012 Saint-Laurent
    • - Keep the minidisc/ProTools assignment in mind right from the beginning
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Sonogram A:

Harmonicmultiples of

the fundamental

Fundamentalfrequency

Sonogram B:

Thick clustersof partials not reinforcing anyparticular frequency

Frequency - pitched & unpitched sounds

Sonograms show us if a sound has a stable, organized pitch, or not:

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5x, 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, 10x, 11x, etc.

2nd harm. 2 x 450 = 900 Hz

3rd harm. 3 x 450 = 1350 Hz

4th harm. 4 x 450 = 1.8 kHz

1st harmonic ~450 Hz

Frequency - pitched & unpitched sounds

Pitched sounds have ordered harmonics, onlycover specific parts of spectrum

Unpitched sounds (e.g. ‘hits’, hiss in this file) cover full stretches of spectrum

Musical/mixed example: excerpts fromJohn Zorn / Kronos Quartet’s Forbidden Fruit

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(A regularly repeating wave cycle such as this one will generate a stable pitch)

(This irregular waveform, which contains little of no repetition, will not generate a stable pitch)

Frequency - pitched & unpitched sounds

Parts of a zoomed-in oscillogram (not the attack) can give us clues about whether the sound is pitched or non-pitched:

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Frequency - pitched & unpitched sounds

Pitched sounds can also be stable (e.g. the examples looked at so far) or unstable (the violin note-gliss-vibrato note below):

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Estherhazy Palace Hall, Austria, where most of the classical composer Haydn’s works were performed in his lifetime. Reverb time: 1.2 seconds

Grosser Musikvereinsaal, Vienna, a major European concert hall. Reverb time: 2.0 seconds

Powell Hall, St. Louis Reverb time: 2.2 seconds

Space

Spatial behavior / perception of sound

Especially in indoor environments, the sound we hear is not only the direct vibrations made by the object, person or process, but a number of echoes and reverberations laid on top of the direct sound, the nature of which is generally referred to as (room) acoustics.

The time it takes for reverberated sound to die down to below the threshold of hearing is called the reverb decay, and is given in seconds or milliseconds

[SWP; OPCH]

Concert halls and other listening environments are / were designed to create a pleasing (but not too confusing) reverberation, in the 1.5 - 2.0 second range:

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Space

Recording studios, on the other hand, are designed with shorter reverb times, because this allows for more control of recorded signals.

But contrary to what many people think, a completely ‘dead’ studio acoustic (i.e., reverb time < 0.3 sec) was only ever considered the ideal in the late 70s and 80s.

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Space

Recording studios, on the other hand, are designed with shorter reverb times, because this allows for more control of recorded signals.

But contrary to what many people think, a completely ‘dead’ studio acoustic (i.e., reverb time < 0.3 sec) was only ever considered the ideal in the late 70s and 80s.

Today, most studio control rooms have reverb times between 0.5 - 0.8 sec, while recording rooms vary from 0.3 sec (e.g., booths for recording voiceovers) to rooms that can be ‘opened up’ to over 1.0 secs when carpeting and other acoustic baffling is removed.

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Speaker clusters for astadium rock concert

Space

Arenas and other large concert venues not designed for sound present the challenge of very long reverb times (>3-4 seconds) that can confuse listeners with too much overlap.

This is usually dealt with by providing as much direct sound to as many parts of the venue as possible.