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Elements of Chicago Style Writing and Documentation . Presentation by: Adam L. Erickson ’09 Johanna Peterson ’08 California Lutheran University Writing Center. Basic Formatting. Margins/Headings

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elements of chicago style writing and documentation

Elements of Chicago Style Writing and Documentation

Presentation by:

Adam L. Erickson ’09

Johanna Peterson ’08

California Lutheran University Writing Center

basic formatting
Basic Formatting
  • Margins/Headings
    • Chicago-style requires 1-inch margins on all sides and papers to be double-spaced in 12-point Times New Roman or Arial font.
  • For the Title Page, the proper heading should be centered about half-way down the page in Size 12 font.
  • The proper formatting for the title page is as follows:

Full Title of Paper

Your Full Name

Course Title

Professor’s Name

Date

basic formatting3
Basic Formatting
  • Example of Title Page Heading:

Final Research Project

Adam Erickson

HIST-470 Teaching History

Dr. Michaela Reaves

May 1, 2008

  • Page numbers go in the upper left-hand corner
    • Use the Header and Footer, then Page Number function on MS Word
    • Your last name together with each page number is optional
    • Example with Last Name: Erickson 2.
basic formatting4
Basic Formatting
  • Footnotes: Basic Formatting
    • All footnotes will be inserted using the Insert Footnote function of word processing programs (MS Word).
      • Single-spaced too.
    • They go at the bottom of the page automatically if done correctly.
    • A footnote should be used at the very end of any quoted material.
    • If a heavy amount of paraphrasing from one source (but no direct quoting) exists in a paragraph, a single footnote at the end is acceptable.
      • Exception: If more than one source is used, footnotes must be present at the end of each instance of paraphrasing or direct quoting.
    • It is acceptable to use the abbreviation “Ibid” (Latin, short for ibidem, “the same place”) to represent the exact same source following its original citation (and any amount subsequently).
basic formatting5
Basic Formatting
  • Footnotes: Basic Formatting (Continued)
    • If a source was used previously in the paper and is used again later, it is acceptable to document that source in “short form” for that instance and every other instance of citing that source that follows.
      • Note: Short form, Ibid., etc. will be explained following the guidelines of how to cite different sources.
basic formatting6
Basic Formatting
  • Works Cited Page(s)
    • A list of every source that was cited in the paper (listed only once).
      • Type “Works Cited” at the top of the page.
    • Goes at the very end of the paper (after the conclusion).
    • Each source in the Works Cited is listed in Alphabetical Order by the authors’ last names.
      • If a source has no documented author, it goes behind all the others with authors.
      • If there are more than one of this type, they are organized in Alphabetical Order by their titles.
    • Only the first line of each source is all the way to the margin; all others are indented one tab space.
basic formatting7
Basic Formatting
  • Example of a Works Cited entry:

Erickson, Adam L. “Elements of Chicago Style Writing and Documentation.” 17 January 2008. Given at: California Lutheran University. (February 1, 2008).

  • There are subtle differences between how sources look in the Works Cited pages and the footnotes; this shall be explained with the citation style guidelines.
citing a published book or textbook
Citing a Published Book or Textbook
  • Footnote Template:

Author’s First and Last Name, Title of Book, # ed., (Publishing City, State: Publishing Company, Year of Publication), Page #.

  • Footnote Example:

George C. Herring, America’s Longest War: The United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975, Fourth ed., (New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 1979-2002), 1-12.

      • When using Ibid. with books, it is necessary to indicate different page numbers, i.e.: Ibid., 13-16.
  • Short Form:

Author’s Last Name, Shortened Title, Page #.

Herring, America’s Longest War, 1-12.

citing a published book or textbook9
Citing a Published Book or Textbook
  • Works Cited Entry Template:

Author’s Last Name, First Name. Title of Book, # ed. Publishing City, State: Publishing Company, Year of Publication.

  • Works Cited Entry Example:

Herring, George C. America’s Longest War: The United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975, Fourth ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. 1979-2002.

citing a scholarly journal article from an online database
Citing a Scholarly Journal Article from an Online Database
  • Footnote Template:

Author’s First and Last Name, “Article Title,” Journal Name, Volume and Issue #’s, (City, State of Publishing: Date of Publishing), pg. #, URL (date you accessed the article).

  • Footnote Example:

Stephen J. Whitfield, “Casting a Cold Eye on the Cold War,” The American Scholar, Vol. 75, No. 1, (Washington: Winter 2006), pg. 134, Available at: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=959290721&sid=8&F mt=2&clientId=20964&RQT=309&VName=PQD (29 Sept. 2007).

  • Short Form:

Author’s Last Name, “Shortened Article Title,” Journal Name, Available at: URL.

citing a scholarly journal article from an online database11
Citing a Scholarly Journal Article from an Online Database
  • Short Form (Continued):

Whitfield, “Casting a Cold Eye…,” The American Scholar, Available at: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=959290721&s id=8&Fmt=2&clientId=20964&RQT=309&VName=PQD.

  • Works Cited Entry Template:

Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Article Title.” Journal Title, Volume and Issue #’s. City, State of Publishing: Date of Publishing. pg. #. Available at: URL (Date YOU Accessed it).

  • Works Cited Entry Example:

Whitfield, Stephen J. “Casting a Cold Eye on the Cold War.” The American Scholar, Vol. 75, No. 1. Washington: Winter 2006, pg. 134. Available at: http://proquest.umi.com/p qdweb?did=959290721&sid=8&Fmt=2&clientId= 209 64&RQT=309&VName=PQD (29 Sept. 2007).

citing a magazine article
Citing a Magazine Article
  • Footnote Template:

Author’s First and Last Name, “Article Title,” Magazine Title, Volume and Issue #’s, Date of Publication, (City, State of Publication: Publishing Company), Page #’s.

  • Footnote Example:

Elizabeth Bentley, “How I was Used by the Red Spy Ring,” McCall’s Magazine, Vol. 78, No. 10, July 1951, (New York, NY: McCall Corporation), pg.120-127.

  • Short Form:

Author’s Last Name, “Shortened Article Title,” Magazine Title, Page #’s.

Bentley, “How I was Used,” McCall’s Magazine, pg. 123.

citing a magazine article13
Citing a Magazine Article
  • Works Cited Entry Template:

Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Article Title.” Magazine Title, Volume and Issue #’s. Date of Publication. City, State of Publication: Publishing Company.

  • Works Cited Entry Example:

Bentley, Elizabeth. “How I was Used by the Red Spy Ring.” McCall’s Magazine, Vol. 78, No.10. July 1951. New York, NY: McCall Corporation.

citing an internet website not a scholarly journal
Citing an Internet Website (Not a Scholarly Journal):
    • Note: When using the Internet for other sites besides scholarly journals, it is important to be aware of the level of scholarship that the site employs.
    • Wikipedia, for example, is not generally considered good scholarship because its articles can be written by anyone who has an account with the website, and they do not have to give their name or credentials.
  • Footnote Template:

Author’s First and Last Name, “Page Title,” Website Title, (Publisher’s Name or Institution: Publishing Date), Date Accessed, Available at: URL.

  • Footnote Example:

Mary Wilson, “Teaching Vietnam,” Incomplete and Profoundly Confused: A Bibliographic Essay on the Vietnam War, (Vanguard University and Mary Wilson: November 1995), 29 Sept. 2007, Available at: http://www.vanguard.edu/faculty/mwilson/index. aspx?doc_id=1724.

citing an internet website not a scholarly journal15
Citing an Internet Website (Not a Scholarly Journal):
  • Short Form:

Author’s Last Name, “Shortened Page Title,” Shortened Website Title, Date Published, Available at: URL

Wilson, “Teaching Vietnam,” Incomplete and Profoundly Confused, 1995, Available at: http://www.vanguard.edu/faculty/mwilson/ index.aspx?doc_id=1724.

      • With many websites, it is likely that some, or possibly a great deal of the information required for the footnotes and the Works Cited entry will be missing (such as author, publishing date, etc.).
      • If too much is missing, it is likely the website does not represent good scholarship and a new source should be found.
citing an internet website not a scholarly journal16
Citing an Internet Website (Not a Scholarly Journal):
  • Works Cited Entry Template:

Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Page Title.” Website Title. Publisher’s Name or Institution: Publishing Date. Available at: URL (Date Accessed).

  • Works Cited Entry Example:

Wilson, Mary. “Teaching Vietnam.” Incomplete and Profoundly Confused: A Bibliographic Essay on the Vietnam War. Vanguard University and Mary Wilson: November 1995. Available at: http://www.vanguard.edu/faculty/ mwilson/index.aspx?doc_id=1724 (29 Sept, 2007).

citing an article or separate source within a published collection with authors editors
Citing an Article or Separate Source Within a Published Collection with Authors/Editors
  • Footnote Template:

Source Author’s First and Last Name, “Article/Source Title,” in Author/Editor of Publication’s First and Last Name, Publication Title, Edition and Volume # (City, State of Publication: Publication Company, Date), Page #’s.

  • Footnote Example:

Mustafa Kemal, “Speech to the Congress of the People’s Republican Party,” in Alfred J. Andrea and James H. Overfield, eds., The Human Record: Sources of Global History, Fifth ed., vol. II: Since 1500 (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2005), 433-434.

citing an article or separate source within a published collection with authors editors18
Citing an Article or Separate Source Within a Published Collection with Authors/Editors
  • Short Form:

Source Author’s Last Name, “Shortened Article/Source Title,” in Author/Editor of Publication’s Last Name, Shortened Publication Title, (Date of Publication), Page #’s.

Kemal, “Speech to the Congress…,” in Andrea and Overfield, eds., The Human Record: (2005), 433.

      • Note: Like regular book formatting, when using Ibid. with this type of citation, it is necessary to note the page numbers after the word “Ibid.”
citing an article or separate source within a published collection with authors editors19
Citing an Article or Separate Source Within a Published Collection with Authors/Editors
  • Works Cited Entry Template:

Source Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Article/Source Title.” in Author/Editor of Publication’s Last Name, First Name. Publication Title, Edition and Volume #’s. City, State of Publication: Date.

  • Works Cited Entry Example:

Kemal, Mustafa. “Speech to the Congress of the People’s Republican Party.” In Andrea, Alfred J. and Overfield, James H., eds. The Human Record: Sources of Global History, Fifth ed. vol. II: Since 1500. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2005.

citing a professor s in class lecture material
Citing a Professor’s In-Class Lecture Material
  • Footnote Template:

Professor’s First and Last Name, “Lecture Title,” Date of Lecture, Given at: School or University where Lecture took place, Date you accessed/reviewed the information.

  • Footnote Example:

Dr. Michaela Reaves, “The Presidency of Harry S. Truman Lecture,” 31 January 2007 – 7 February 2007, Given at: California Lutheran University, February 22, 2007.

  • Short Form:

Professor’s Last Name, “Shortened Lecture Title,” Date you accessed/reviewed the information.

Reaves, “Harry S. Truman,” February 22, 2007.

citing a professor s in class lecture material21
Citing a Professor’s In-Class Lecture Material
  • Works Cited Entry Template:

Professor’s Last Name, First Name. “Lecture Title.” Date of Lecture. Given at: School or University where Lecture took place, (Date you accessed/reviewed the information).

  • Works Cited Entry Example:

Reaves, Dr. Michaela. “The Presidency of Harry S. Truman Lecture.” 31 January 2007 – 7 February 2007. Given at: California Lutheran University. (February 22, 2007).

using chicago style in ms word
Using Chicago-Style in MS Word
  • Instructions for Inserting Footnotes into Documents created in Microsoft Office Word Versions 98-03:
    • At the top of the program, click Insert.
    • This brings down a menu; scroll down and mouse over Reference.
    • This brings up another set of options; click on Footnote.
    • This will bring up a pop-up screen; all the default settings on it should be correct. Click the Insert button at the bottom of the pop-up.
      • This will bring up the footnote at the bottom of the page; it will be in font size 10 if your work is already in size 12. Insert the proper information here.
using chicago style in ms word23
Using Chicago-Style in MS Word
  • Instructions for Inserting Footnotes into Documents created in Microsoft Office Word Version 2007:
    • Click on the word References to bring up the References toolbar.
    • On the Footnote pane, click the Insert Footnote button.
      • This will bring up the footnote at the bottom of the page; it will be in font size 10 if your work is already in size 12. Insert the proper information here.
      • In MS Word 2007, sometimes the footnotes will be double-spaced along with the paper. You must change this manually by selecting the footnote area and clicking the Single Space button.