CCE 125: Program Planning - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

nevin
cce 125 program planning n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
CCE 125: Program Planning PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
CCE 125: Program Planning

play fullscreen
1 / 14
Download Presentation
CCE 125: Program Planning
64 Views
Download Presentation

CCE 125: Program Planning

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. CCE 125: Program Planning Monday & Wednesday 6:30-7:45 North Seattle Community College, IB 1409

  2. CCE 125: Program Planning • Candice Hoyt, Faculty • (206) 715-1878 (until 9 pm) • Office hours by appointmentchoyt@sccd.ctc.edu • http://facweb.northseattle.edu/choyt • Syllabus: • http://facweb.northseattle.edu/choyt/CCE125 • Online—Angel: • http://northseattle.angellearning.com/ • CCE 125 Program Planning (Hoyt - hybrid) W10

  3. Monday 2/22 • Oral Stories presenting • Picture books (moved up from 2/24) • Learning Stories • Assignment change • Discuss 2/24 assignments • Process Chart • Physical Science Activity

  4. Oral Stories presentations • Tell your story aloud: • From memory (no notes or props) • Beginning phrase • Ending phrase • Maintain eye contact with all listeners • 3-8 minutes. Your group will time you. They can help you by giving you cues about time left, if you want. • Use score sheet to score each other’s stories (each person scores each other person’s). Include scorer’s name, so I can ask if I need clarification on anything.

  5. Picture books • Types of books • Informational / story • Without words • With words, but the pictures can tell the stories • With words that are necessary to understand the story • Infants/toddlers • Cloth books & board books plus paper books • Tactile (fuzzy, etc), windows/doors • Short words and familiar pictures/illustrations & ideas • Preschool & infants/toddlers… • Books without words for creative, “loose” storytelling (adults too) • Books with words but pictures can tell the story alone • Words with repetition so children can “read” by themselves • Word-picture books that adults read

  6. Picture Books: Recommendations • Seattle Public Library: • http://www.spl.org/default.asp?pageID=collection_readinglists_category&catID=1 • Your favorites? • Rain, Peter Speers (wordless) • Arnie the Doughnut • The Giving Tree • Chrysanthemum • Silly Sally • There’s a Wocket in My Pocket • Is This a House for a Hermit Crab? • The Knuffle Bunny • Skippyjonjones • I’ll Love You Forever • Guess How Much I Love You • Pinkalicious, Purplelicious, Gold… • Eloise • Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs • Tuesday • Froggy books • Little Bear • Bedtime for Frances • Owl Moon • Madeleine • Harold and the Purple Crayon • King Babaar • Green Eggs and Ham • The Cake that Mac Ate • Harry McLarry from Donaldson’s Dairy • Little Black Sambo • Urban Babies • Go Away, Green Monster! • Alexander and the… Bad Day • The Gift of the Magi • I Love You, Stinky Face • Sam and the Firefly • Pancakes over Pittsburg • Dr Seuss (anything) • Eric Carle • Sandra Boynton

  7. Learning Stories for CCE 125 CHANGE – You may choose between these two options: • (1) Traditional: Learning Story about a child • (2) Personal: Learning Story about yourself relating to your work with children or your experience in these classes • Same format: • Story • What It Means • Opportunities and Possibilities • Reflection • Only required to post when complete • Can post for feedback from peers • Can email to me for feedback/review up to 48 hours before final is due

  8. (1) Learning Story about a child • Observe a child or a group of children engaged in an activity of their choice. Take photographs of the stages of their play that began with the child's initiative. Take notes on what the child or children say and do. • Write a Learning Story for this child that includes all four parts. • FORMAT: • Part 1: The Story • Part 2: What It Means • Part 3: Opportunities and Possibilities • Part 4: Responses (family, child, other teachers, children or adults)

  9. (2) Learning Story about yourself • Personal: Learning Story about yourself relating to your work with children • Story about a moment/ experience you feel was meaningful in your growth as a teacher-caregiver – photos are helpful but not required. • What It Means: What is significant about this story? • Opportunities and Possibilities: What can you seek out and try that will help you continue this kind of growth? • Reflection: You or someone else reflect on this Learning Story. What was it like for you to write this? … to read it? You could show it to peers or supervisors for their feedback.

  10. A 3.4 Learning Story – 10 points • Write a Learning Story about yourself or a child that includes all four parts. • Part 1: The Story • Part 2: What It Means • Part 3: Opportunities and Possibilities • Part 4: • About child: Responses (family, child, teachers, others) • About yourself (choose): • Reflect: What it was like to do this? What it is like to read it? • Responses: peers, directors, … • DELIVERABLES: • (a) OPTIONAL: Post Part 1 online.OPTIONAL: Reply to each other. • (b) DUE 3/1 (4 points): OPTIONAL: Post Parts 1-3 online.OPTIONAL: Reply to each other. • (c) DUE 3/10 (4 point): OPTIONAL: Post Parts 1-4. OPTIONAL: Reply to each other. • (d) DUE 3/15 (2 points): DUE 3/17 (10 points):Post complete story online and present in group out of class. OPTIONAL: Reply to each other.Extra credit: 0.5 pts per comment, up to 5 pts.

  11. Due 2/24: Physical Science Activity 3.6 PHYSICAL SCIENCE (4 pts) • Develop a physical science experiment that you could demonstrate to children. It could involve air, water, light, movement, electricity, etc. The TV programs Mr. Wizard or Bill Nye, books in the library and the supplemental text are sources of ideas. These demonstrate a transformation that the children can observe and participate in a discussion about what will happen, describe the effect, and describe the result. • Demonstrating a transformation in front of the class. • Name each item, giving names to everything the class sees. • Ask description and prediction questions of the class. • What will happen? • What is happening now? • What happened? • Document the predictions and outcomes for each step. • Long spaces for children to document their understanding and do their own inquiry. • Wed 2/24 Assignment: Post detailed activity plan for teachers to try, including your experience presenting it. • Be prepared to discuss your activity in class.

  12. Due 2/24: Process Activity • 3.1 Process Activity Chart (4 pts) • Select food item or something useful to make that children 3 to 5 years old would enjoy making with as little assistance as possible. Draw pages of a process chart for making that item. Try it out on children (so they can help each other figure out what to do). Use the Demonstration/Do/Review system as explained in class. Display your process chart in the classroom and describe to the group what happened. It must be a multi-step process and NOT the ones done in class or presented in the packet. • REQUIREMENTS • a four-year-old child could prepare the item (dangerous steps excepted) following a demonstration. • one to three words on each frame. • neat primary script printing using lower case letters. • implemented and described orally • Wed 2/24 Assignment: • Post pages of illustrated chart (preferred) or list of steps. • Bring illustrated chart to class.

  13. Due Tonight • A 3.3 Oral Storytelling – post story online (full story or key highlights, as attachment)

  14. Grant paperwork • CWA JOBSTAT Enrollment Form • Authorization for Release of Information