slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Good for me PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Good for me

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 51

Good for me - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 323 Views
  • Uploaded on

Maths is Brussels sprouts. Good for me. but YUCK!. What do you do?. I’m a maths teacher. I am hopeless at maths!. I can’t read!. Doing maths is an emotional practice. During secondary school, many students become more negative about maths.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Good for me' - neveah


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Maths is Brussels sprouts.

Good for me

but YUCK!

slide6

Doing maths is an emotional practice.

During secondary school, many students become more negative about maths.

Many students are reluctant to take maths beyond the compulsory years.

slide8

Year 11

5 no longer participating in academic stream

slide9

Year 12

16 no longer participating in academic stream

slide11

Similar ageSimilar backgroundsSimilar classroom communities

YETEach student had a unique journey through mathematics with unique learning experiences and outcomes.

BECAUSEEach student had a unique relationship with mathematics

slide12

Relationship with mathematics

    • Views of maths
    • Feelings about maths
    • Perception of ability
    • Mathematical knowledge
    • Habits of engagement
students views of maths

school

Students’ Views of Maths
  • Mathematics is a unique subject
    • Strict rules to be learnt
    • Only one answer
    • Cumulative nature
    • Mostly individual work
    • Unchanging classroom routines
slide14

Mathematics is a unique subject

  • Important
  • I know you need to know this (Sean)
  • Maths is just a subject I do in school to help in later life when I have a job (Saskia)

… ish

slide17

Mathematics is a unique subject

  • Difficulty
  • Maths [is] harder and you have to think more than in other subjects. It’s all thinky … it’s too fancy (Bridget)
  • There’s just a lot to it. There’s a lot more than other subjects (Debbie)
  • It’s real difficult sometimes to memorise all the different things (Angela)
slide18

Mathematics is a unique subject

  • Visual nature
  • You sort of look over every now and then to see what they’re up to (Connor).
slide20

Katrina: The worst thing about the maths is the boredom. Doing textbook work, doing stuff on the whiteboard.

  • Alasdair: Copying down irrelevant notes
  • Katrina: Even copying down relevant notes is boring. The teacher comes into the room and says…right, here’s a new topic, write these notes and turn to page 37 and do 1,3,5,7.
  • Alasdair: [Excited] That’s the one! That’s exactly it. That hit the nail right on the head. That is maths.
slide21

Relationship with mathematics

    • Views of maths
    • Feelings about maths
    • Perception of ability
    • Mathematical knowledge
    • Habits of engagement
slide22

I feel happy and good about maths. It is my favourite subject (Colin)

It’s pretty much middle of the road. Don’t really care that much. It’s just there (Paul)

Maths is poos

Brussel sprouts

I would leave it on my plate

A cold, wet, windy day

A crusty old bus

A turkey (Ruth)

I hate maths! (Tracey)

slide23

The majority of students disliked mathematics.

Maths is different from other subjects because so many people don’t like it (Amanda).

slide24

Many of the students became more negative about mathematics during their journey.

The transition from primary school to secondary school was particularly difficult.

In primary school it was just enjoyable to do ... not how it is now … kind of hard … it’s just bookwork and stuff now (Paul).

slide25

Disliking mathematics…

  • Affected students’ engagement

In maths I don’t really pay attention that much compared to art and stuff because I enjoy those subjects (Nicola)

slide26

Disliking mathematics…

  • Led tostudents having negative feelings in each mathematical situation.

I feel bad about maths so I just look at the question and think uugh (Amanda)

slide27

Disliking mathematics…

  • Affected students’ decisions to continue in mathematics and pursue career goals

I’d rather choose a different subject because I like other subjects better (Jennifer)

I used to want to do something in tourism but then I found out like it was mostly mathematics. I thought it was like sort of helping people (Corrina)

slide28

Relationship with mathematics

    • Views of maths
    • Feelings about maths
    • Perception of ability
    • Mathematical knowledge
    • Habits of engagement
slide29

I’m quite good at maths (Angela)

I am like bad at [maths]. Always knew it as like my worst subject … it was sort of a belief I guess (Corrina)

slide30

Classmates

Doing

Perception of ability

Family

Teachers

Class placement

slide31

Evidence of

ability

Expectations

1

Feelings

Motivation to engage

slide32

Relationship with mathematics

    • Views of maths
    • Feelings about maths
    • Perception of ability
    • Mathematical knowledge
    • Habits of engagement
slide33

I know maths. I understand it (Colin)

I need definite steps of how to do a task that I learn off by heart so I can really understand it (Robyn)

I wouldn’t even know my times tables (Ruth)

slide34

Relationship with mathematics

    • Views of maths
    • Feelings about maths
    • Perception of ability
    • Mathematical knowledge
    • Habits of engagement
slide35

Habits of engagement

  • Pathways of engagement
  • Engagement skills

Communication, Cooperation, Utilisation of feelings

Perseverance, Intimacy, Integrity, Independence, Reflection

slide36

Relationship with mathematics

    • Views of maths
    • Feelings about maths
    • Perception of ability
    • Mathematical knowledge
    • Habits of engagement
slide37

Relationship with mathematics

    • Views of maths
    • Feelings about maths
    • Perception of ability
    • Mathematical knowledge
    • Habits of engagement
slide38

Relationship with mathematics

Context of

the moment

Engagement in a mathematical task

Unique learning experience and outcomes

slide39

Vulnerable Students

Thriving Students

Disliked mathematics

Unconvinced of importance of mathematics

Did not feel confident in their ability

Had ineffective engagement skills

Had tenuous motivational factors

Remembered rules “off by heart”

Enjoyed mathematics

Viewed mathematics as an important life skill

Felt confident in their ability

Had effective engagement skills

Had multiple motivational factors

Understood rules and their alternatives

slide40

Teachers

  • Teachers influence students’
    • Views of mathematics
    • Feelings about mathematics
    • Understanding of what constitutes knowledge, learning, and teaching
    • Expectations and perceptions of ability
slide41

Teachers

  • Teachers help to construct
    • The routines of the mathematics class
    • Social norms
    • Help and help-seeking norms
    • Seating arrangements
slide42

Vulnerable

Thriving

?

slide43

Get to know the students well

  • Teachers just need to get to know us better (Robyn)
  • It’s not just our maths they need to get to know, it’s how we feel about our maths … Even if we like maths or not. They need to care about us and maths (Ruth)
  • Just talk to the students about maths and other stuff (Bridget)
  • Metaphor work - Draw a mathematician - Autobiography-Personal journey graph - Journal – Draw a picture
slide44

Reflect on the routines of the classroom

  • Please! Some variety! (Alasdair)
  • Reflect on
  • the structure of the lessons
  • the tasks assigned
  • the way content is introduced
slide45

Be explicit about the importance of engaging in mathematics

  • People who can't be bothered trying, are doomed to fail at maths (Katrina)
  • We learn maths by doing it (Ben)
    • Help students to recognise and act on feelings of confusion and worry when working on mathematical tasks.
    • Encourage students to develop effective engagement skills
slide46

Accept and harness students’ social needsMoira likes being social and that’s more important to her than doing her work(Mrs Brown)

Ben works well in class despite social nature(Mr Carter)

We need to be social. It’s the puberty thing. That’s where the focus of school is (Saskia)

Maths, it’s a subject where talking helps you more than when you talk in English(Ann)

slide47

Find ways students can socialise AND use each other as resources and emotional support.

  • Who a student sits near affects
    • how they feel about mathematics
    • their level of engagement
  • Design seating plans so that the students are not disrupted by and are comfortable with the classmates they are sitting near.
conclusions
Conclusions
  • Students have complex relationships with mathematics.
  • These relationships change over time as students experience mathematics.
  • Most mathematics students are vulnerable
  • Teachers are an important influence on students’ relationships with mathematics.
slide49

Thriving Student

Vulnerable Student

  • Get to know students well.
  • Reflect on the routines of the classroom.
  • Be explicit about the importance of engagement.
  • Accept and harness students’ social needs.
  • Design seating plans.
slide50

It is heartening that we, as teachers, are able to improve students’ mathematical journeys.

It is heartening that the subject of mathematics lends itself so beautifully to this task.

slide51

Naomi Ingram

Lecturer

College of Education

University of Otago

naomi.ingram@otago.ac.nz