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Scientific Notation & Significant Figures in Measurement

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  1. Scientific Notation &Significant Figures in Measurement Dr. SonaliSaha Chemistry Honors Fall 2014

  2. Scientific Notation In science, we deal with some very LARGE numbers: 1 mole = 602257000000000000000000 We also deal with some very SMALL numbers: Mass of an electron = 0.000000000000000000000000000000091 kg

  3. Imagine the difficulty of calculating the mass of 1 mole of electrons! 0.000000000000000000000000000000091 kg x 602257000000000000000000 ???????????????????????????????????

  4. For really large and really small numbers, a convenient way to represent them is by using: Scientific Notation: A method of representing very large or very small numbers in the form: M x 10n • M is a number between 1 and 10 • n is an integer

  5. . 2 500 000 000 9 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 8 Step #1: Insert a decimal point Step #2: Decide where the decimal must end up so that one number is to its left Step #3: Count how many places you bounce the decimal point Step #4: Re-write in the form M x 10n

  6. 2.5 x 109 The exponent is the number of places we moved the decimal. Note the exponent is positive because the original number was greater than 1.

  7. 0.0000579 1 2 3 4 5 Step #1: Decide where the decimal must end up so that one number is to its left Step #2: Count how many places you bounce the decimal point Step #3: Re-write in the form M x 10n

  8. 5.79 x 10-5 The exponent is negative because the original number was less than 1.

  9. Characteristics of Measurement Measurement - quantitative observation consisting of 2 parts Part 1 - number Part 2 – unit of measure Examples: 20grams 20 mL

  10. Why Is there Uncertainty in Measurements? • Measurements are performed with instruments. • No instrument can read to an infinite number of decimal places. Which of these balances has the greatest uncertainty in measurement?

  11. Precision and Accuracy Accuracyrefers to the agreement of a particular value with the “true” value. Precisionrefers to the degree of agreement among several measurements made in the same manner. Precise but not accurate Precise AND accurate Neither accurate nor precise

  12. More on Precision… • Precision also refers to the smallest calibrated markings on laboratory instruments and equipment. • The precision of our electronic scale is 1/10th of a gram. • The precision of a graduated cylinder is 1 milliliter (1 mL), of a beaker it is 10 mL, of a burette is 0.1 mL

  13. Significant Figures • When reporting a measurement, how many significant figures/digits should you use? The significant figures of a number are those digits that carry meaning contributing to its precision.

  14. Rules for using significant figures to express lab measurement The measurement represented by the smallest graduated marking

  15. For example you used a beaker and measured 20 mL (one sig. fig.) while the mass of the water was 18.2 g (three sig. figs) how would you report your density value? Multiplication and Division:The number of sig figs in the result equals the number in the least precise measurement used in the calculation. 18.2 (3 sig.fig) ÷ 20 (1 sig.fig.) = calculator says 0.91 REALLY IS = 0.9 g/mL

  16. Rules for Significant Figures in Mathematical Operations Addition and Subtraction: The number of decimal places in the result equals the number of decimal places in the least precise measurement. 6.8 + 11.934 = 18.734  18.7 (1 place after the decimal)

  17. Rules for Counting Significant Figures • Exact numbers(definitions and counting numbers)have an infinite number of significant figures. 1inch=2.54cm, exactly

  18. Rules for Counting Significant Figures - Zeros -Leading zerosdo not count as significant figures. 0.0486has 3sig figs.

  19. Rules for Counting Significant Figures - Zeros -Captive zerosalways count as significant figures. 16.07has 4sig figs.

  20. Rules for Counting Significant Figures - Zeros Trailing zerosare significantif the number contains a decimal point. Little bit ambiguous!!!! 9.300has 4sig figs. 9300has 2sig figs.

  21. Sig Fig Practice #1 How many significant figures in each of the following measurements? 1.0070 m  5 sig figs 17.10 kg  4 sig figs 100,890 L  5 sig figs 3.29 x 103 s  3 sig figs 0.0054 cm  2 sig figs 3,200,000  2 sig figs

  22. Sig Fig Practice #2 Correct Answer Calculation Calculator says: 10.24 3.24 m + 7.0 m 10.2 m 100.0 g - 23.73 g 76.3 g 76.27 0.02 cm + 2.371 cm 2.39 cm 2.391 713.1 L - 3.872 L 709.228 709.2 L 1821.6 lb 1818.2 lb + 3.37 lb 1821.57 0.160 mL 0.16 2.030 mL - 1.870 mL

  23. Sig Fig Practice #3 Correct Answer Calculation Calculator says: 22.68 3.24 m x 7.0 m 23 m2 100.0 g ÷ 23.7 cm3 4.22 g/cm3 4.219409283 0.02 cm x 2.371 cm 0.05 cm2 0.04742 710 m ÷ 3.0 s 236.6666667 240 m/s 5870 lb·ft 1818.2 lb x 3.23 ft 5872.786 0.358885017 0.359 g/mL 1.030 g ÷ 2.87 mL