Amanda Cashman , Brenley Devlin, Brent Ploughe, Bill Tehan Western Illinois University - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Amanda Cashman , Brenley Devlin, Brent Ploughe, Bill Tehan Western Illinois University

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  1. Amanda Cashman, Brenley Devlin, Brent Ploughe, Bill Tehan Western Illinois University “Social media is like water. On its own, water does some cool things, but when combined with other compounds it enabled the evolution of all forms of life." - Volpe, 2012

  2. What are Social networks? We define social network sites as web-based services that allow individuals to: • Construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system • Articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection • View and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system.

  3. Types of Social Media utilized In Higher education • Facebook • Twitter • LinkedIn • Blogging • Messaging Boards • YouTube • Google Docs • Spotify

  4. Who is using Social Media? • Research at the University of New Hampshire found percentage of UNH students who used each platform (social media) daily: • Facebook 96% • YouTube 84% • Blogs 20% • Twitter 14% • MySpace 12% • LinkedIn 10% • CNN found: 98% of College have a Facebook page; 84% have a Twitter page • If Facebook were a country, it would be the 3rd most populated in the world (behind only China and India) • 2 billion YouTube videos viewed per day. • Americans spend a quarter of their online time on social networking sites • 40% of social media users have social networking on their smartphones

  5. Institutions with effective social media practices • Texas A&M • The Ohio State University • Harvard University

  6. Texas A&M University The Ohio State University Harvard University

  7. Taking social media to the next level at middle college • Coordinate Strategy across Campus • Invest in Education and Training • Get Students Involved • Put your School’s President on Facebook/Twitter

  8. How will using Social Media influence our university? Middle college Facebook Page Middle college Twitter Page

  9. Addressing concerns With social media • Compliance Program • Guest Speakers/Programs • Video with current students on website – addressing issues related to social media • Review of Code of Conduct policy • Create a Social Media Living Learning Community • Monitor and Coordinate all social media networks at Middle College

  10. electronic civility pledge

  11. Theoretical Foundations • Baxter-Magolda’s: Self-Authorship Theory • Kolb’s Learning Styles • Perry’s Ethical Development Theory • Transformational Learning

  12. Questions? Follow us on Facebook & Twitter 

  13. References • Abram, S. (2012). Social media in higher education. Stephen’s Lighthouse. Retrieved February 18, 2012, from http://stephenslighthouse.com/2012/02/13/social-media-in-higher-education-2/. • Boyd, D. M., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), article 11. Retrieved February 17, 2012, from http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/boyd.ellison.html. • Crowe, A. (2011). Establishing responsible social media use. Strategy & Leadership in Critical Times: Emergency Management. Retrieved February 19, 2012, from http://www.emergencymgmt.com/safety/Establishing-Responsible-Social-Media-Use-030711.html. • Frankel, J. (2011). WeComply Announces Responsible Social Media Use Training Course Now Available. PRWeb: Online Visibility from Vocus. Retrieved February 19, 2012, from http://www.prweb.com/releases/compliancetraining/socialmedia/prweb8964188.htm. • Howard, J. (2011). Social media lure academics frustrated by journals. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved February 18, 2012, from http://chronicle.com/article/Social-Media-Lure- Academics/126426/. • Keeling, R. P. (2006). Learning reconsidered 2: A practical guide to implementing a campus-wide focus on student experience. Washington DC: ACPA, ACUHO-I, NACADA, NACA, NASPA & NIRSA. • Kegan, R. (1994). In over our heads: The mental demands of modern life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. • Nielsen. (2011). Social Media Report. Nielsen. Retrieved February 19, 2012, from http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/social/. • UmikaPidaparthy. (2012). How college use, misuse social media to reach students. CNN.com. Retrieved February 19, 2012, from http://www.cnn.com/2011/10/20/tech/social-media/universities-social- media/index.html • University of New Hampshire. (2012). Social networking usage and grades among college students. Retrieved February 17, 2012, from http://www.unh.edu/news/docs/UNHsocialmedia.pdf. • Volpe, M. (2012). How can social media be incorporate into your communication at Notre Dame. Retrieved February 17, 2012, from http://blogs.nd.edu/donschindler/2011/04/18/how-can-social-media-be- incorporated-into-your-communications-at-notre-dame/.