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Smoke Management. John De Leon The Nature Conservancy of Texas Burn Crew Manager jdeleon@tnc.org (361) 572-8711 (Phone) (361) 220-1205 (Mobile) (361) 572-8255 (Fax) nature.org. Smoke Sensitive Areas.

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Smoke Management


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    1. Smoke Management John De Leon The Nature Conservancy of TexasBurn Crew Managerjdeleon@tnc.org(361) 572-8711 (Phone) (361) 220-1205 (Mobile) (361) 572-8255 (Fax) nature.org

    2. Smoke Sensitive Areas An area on which, for reasons of visibility, health or human welfare, smoke could have an inverse impact. • Roads • Populated Areas • Schools • Hospitals • Airports • Towns • Cities • People with breathing disorders

    3. Major Pollutants of Prescribed Fire Carbon Monoxide and Particulate Matter Particulate Matter can be hazardous to human health and safety by being inhaled and reducing visibility

    4. Conditions that produce more smoke • Fuels that are more compact • Fuels with high moisture • Larger fuel like stumps, snags, and brush piles • Heavier fuel loading

    5. Smoke Management Basics • Avoid smoke sensitive areas • Disperse and Dilute smoke • Reduce emissions(Firing techniques, burning conditions, etc.)

    6. Considerations When Pre-planning Know Your… • Wind direction • Mixing Heights • Transport Winds • Predicted Weather • Dispersion Index – if available www.nws.noaa.gov/ Have… • Smoke Signs Posted • Smoke Monitors • Monitor weather throughout the day

    7. Minimize Risk Checklist • Mixing Height of 1700’ or more • Transport wind speed of 9mph or greater • Complete ignitions before mid-afternoon • Promptly mop-up and monitor for smoke hazards • For night burns, backing fires with surface wind speeds greater than 4 mph and RH under 80% should be used • Daytime Dispersion Index between 41 and 60 is adequate

    8. In Case of Smoke Out… • Have Emergency Numbers on Hand • Don’t be afraid to call for emergency assistance to avoid possible traffic accidents

    9. Mixing Heights The altitude above which vertical mixing does not occur. At this height hot air cannot rise any further therefore dispersing outward like a mushroom. Mixing heights below 1700’ are often associated with pollution episodes.

    10. Transport Wind Speed The average horizontal wind speed between the surface fuel(20’ above vegetation) and the mixing height. Transport wind speeds below 9mph are often associated with pollution episodes.

    11. Atmospheric Dispersion Index • Atmospheric dispersion is the process by which the atmosphere mixes and transports particulates, such as smoke, away from their source. • ADI DESCRIPTION • 0-20 Poor dispersion, stagnant if persistent. • 21-40 Poor to fair, stagnation may be indicated if accompanied by low wind speeds. • 41-60 Generally Good • 61-80 Very good dispersion. • 75 and above, Control problems likely. 80 + Excellent dispersion, Control problems expected.

    12. Smoke Plotting