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Autism - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Autism. Autism was initially misdiagnosed and treated as a mental disease or a psychological disorder mistakenly thought be to be brought upon by “cold” parenting style, parental neglect or abuse. Autism is a broad spectrum neurological disorder with no known cause. It is not behavior issue.

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Autism


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    1. Autism Autism was initially misdiagnosed and treated as a mental disease or a psychological disorder mistakenly thought be to be brought upon by “cold” parenting style, parental neglect or abuse. Autism is a broad spectrum neurological disorder with no known cause. It is not behavior issue

    2. Autistic Disorder Childhood Disintegrative Disorder Pervasive Developmental Disorder NOS Asperger’s Disorder Rett’s Disorder Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    3. Demographics • Approximately 1 out of 99 children ages 3 to 17 are diagnosed with autism • 1 in 70 boys • 30% also have ADHD • Meet one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism

    4. Impairments in Social Behavior • non-verbal behavior • May have poor eye contact. Limited gestures. • peer relationships • May not interact with peers. • comprehension • May not understand simple questions, jokes, sarcasm. • spoken language • May lack or demonstrate delay in spoken language. • May have monotone or have unusual pitch or rhythm. • initiation • May not initiate or sustain a conversation. • Might not know to ask a question

    5. Impairments in Communication • Don’t understand time • how long to use a computer • Visual • maps of library, etc • Need very specific instructions • Not just clean up, what clean up • Can’t take experiences and apply to a new situation • can’t read a room • Can’t read body language or facial expressions

    6. Learning Restrictive, Repetitive, and Stereotyped Patterns of Behavior • limited interests • May only be interested in trains. • ritualistic • May line up objects in particular pattern and tantrum if pattern is upset. • stereotypy • May engage in hand flapping. • over selectivity • Preoccupied with parts of objects.

    7. Tantrums. Why? Maybe the person is feeling overwhelmed with a noisy environment and knows if he or she tantrums, they will be removed from the environment. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiOI365yD1Q

    8. Restricted Behavioral Repertoire May have preoccupations with… • chin-tapping • head-banging • clapping • tearing paper • breaking glass • spinning things • spinning oneself or running in circles • colored and shiny objects • matching objects • blinking compulsively • switching lights on and off • dropping things repetitively • jumping • rocking • hand-shaking • flicking objects

    9. Variations in Autism no concept of private conversation Inability to stop talking physical overactivity difficulty mixing in with other people no fear of real dangers inappropriate laughter oversensitive to pain spin objects apparent insensitivity to noise resist changes in routine poor eye contact inappropriate attachment to objects uneven skill level across areas oversensitive to noise extreme passivity sustained by odd play apparent insensitivity to pain

    10. Barriers to Inclusion • Parents of children with autism often avoid community interaction because of the child’s “inappropriate” tendencies. • Make parents feel welcome. • Onlookers might misunderstand the person’s behavior and/or the caregiver’s reactions. • How you interact will be show the way for our other patrons should interact.

    11. Show Respect • the way you talk with anyone else • people-first language • correct disability terms • protecting privacy and confidentiality • listening to the person • speak directly to the person • providing opportunities for expression • allowing the person to make choices • having developmentally-appropriate expectations

    12. Participation • Value the dignity of each individual. • Be patient and allow the person time to complete tasks. • When offering help, first ask what help is needed • Perhaps bend a rule or two…checking out the same book again and again.

    13. Grant Outcomes • Collection Development • My Library Book • Guide Book • Online Resources • Decals on the doors • Raise awareness