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SAFETY. Getting Started in the Shop. Facility Safety. Evacuation Plan - 300 Feet from building Top of hill – WAIT FOR ALL CLEAR SIGNAL Instructor roll call CDX Video – Occupational Safety + Health Identifying Hazards Evacuating in an Emergency JSRCC BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL. Parking.

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safety

SAFETY

Getting Started

in the Shop

facility safety
Facility Safety
  • Evacuation Plan -
    • 300 Feet from building
    • Top of hill – WAIT FOR ALL CLEAR SIGNAL
    • Instructor roll call
    • CDX Video – Occupational Safety + Health
      • Identifying Hazards
      • Evacuating in an Emergency
  • JSRCC BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL
parking
Parking
  • ONLY PARK OUT FRONT
  • Any vehicle parked in back lot will be ticketed/towed
  • All vehicles to be worked on MUST have a properly filled out “BLUE” form on dash
other things
Other things
  • SMOKING: State law = 25 ft from doors
    • Butts in containers!
  • FIRST AID KITS: Note location
  • KEEP your area clean – leave the classroom/shop clean!
hydraulic floor jacks
Hydraulic Floor Jacks
  • Be careful to lift at manufacturer’s recommended locations only.
  • The jack must be able to roll as the vehicle rises, or the jack pad may slip!
  • Always use jack stands to support the vehicle after lifting.
lift safety cont d
Lift Safety (cont’d)
  • Always follow the lift guide and vehicle manufacturer’s service information when lifting a vehicle.
  • Ensure proper contact between the lift and the vehicle.
  • Lift the vehicle about six inches, shake, and recheck contact points.
hydraulic jack and safety stand safety
Hydraulic Jack andSafety Stand Safety
  • Never attempt to lift something heavier than the jack is designed for.
  • Be sure the jack lift pad is under the specified vehicle lift point.
  • Position the safety stands under a strong chassis member.
  • The safety stand legs must contact the floor evenly.
  • Remove the jack after the vehicle is sitting on the safety stands.
lift safety
Lift Safety
  • Be sure the lift is completely lowered.
  • Do not run into or over the lift arms.
  • Be sure the lift pads contact the specified vehicle lift points.
  • Close the doors and trunk lid.
  • After the vehicle is raised, be sure the safety mechanism is engaged.
vehicle lifts
Vehicle Lifts

Electric or hydraulic

  • Frame contact
vehicle lifts1
Vehicle Lifts
  • Wheel contact
lifting a vehicle safely
Lifting a Vehicle Safely
  • Follow vehicle manufacturer’s recommended lift points.
  • Use lift manufacturer’s precautions for use.
  • Have the instructor check the position of the rack pads.
lifting a vehicle safely continued
Lifting a Vehicle Safely(continued)
  • Shake the vehicle as soon as the wheels leave the floor. Make sure the vehicle is stable.
  • After the vehicle is raised, lower to engage a safety stop.
  • Be aware of the vehicle’s center of gravity (see Figure 2.23).
question
Question
  • Technician A uses safety stands when removing large components from a hoisted vehicle. Technician B always lowers the vehicle on the mechanical locks after lifting the vehicle to proper working height. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
slide17

CG-ME-RWD

CG-FWD

CG-FE-FWD

question1
Question
  • An engine needs to be moved. Technician A says two people can slide the engine out of the way. Technician B says that an engine crane should be used. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • B = use an engine crane (cherry picker)
question2
Question
  • True or False: You should support a vehicle by only a hydraulic jack?
    • FALSE
  • True or False: ALWAYS use jack stands when supporting a vehicle.
    • TRUE
  • True or False: Always store a floor jack handle in the upright position so that nobody can trip over the handle.
    • TRUE
air compressors
Air Compressors
  • Make sure a pressure relief valve is installed on the compressor.
  • Inspect air hoses and fittings before use.
compressed air safety
Compressed Air Safety
  • Never direct compressed air at yourself or others.
  • Compressed air entering the bloodstream can be FATAL.
  • Wear eye protection.
shop equipment and safety
Shop Equipment and Safety
  • Always be safety conscious.
  • Accidents are often the result of carelessness or ignorance.
shop equipment and safety continued
Shop Equipment and Safety(continued)
  • Reduce obvious hazards:
    • Slippery floors.
    • Obstructed walkways.
    • Frayed electrical cords.
    • Broken equipment.
protecting your eyes
Protecting Your Eyes
  • Eye protection is necessary in the automotive shop.
  • The best policy is to wear them whenever you are working.
  • Wear a full face shield when conditions warrant.
question3
QUESTION
  • Technician A says that safety glasses should be worn at ALL times in the shop. Technician B says safety glasses need to have an approved safety lens and side protection. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C- Both
question4
Question
  • Technician A says safety glasses are only necessary when working with power tools. Technician B says to remove jewelry when performing automotive service. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • B = Technician B only
hydraulic presses
Hydraulic Presses

Be extremely careful using a press:

  • Parts can explode under the 20–50 tons of pressure applied.
hydraulic presses continued
Hydraulic Presses (continued)
  • Use safety guards.
  • Wear eye protection.
  • Watch for sudden pressure increases with no movement of the work.
back protection
Back Protection
  • Lift with your legs,

not your back.

  • Keep your back straight

while lifting.

  • Ask for help with

heavy loads.

question5
QUESTION
  • When lifting heavy objects, always lift with the:
  • Legs
  • Back
  • Neck
  • Arms only
    • A = Legs
ear protection
Ear Protection
  • Hearing damage happens over time.
  • You cannot recover from the damage done.
  • Wear hearing protection when needed.
question6
Question
  • Ringing in the ears and headaches could be a sign of:
  • Carbon monoxide breathed into the lungs
  • Too much noise
  • Too much oxygen
  • Too much nitrogen
    • B = too much noise
personal protection
Personal Protection
  • Make sure loose clothing and long hair are tucked safely away.
  • Jewelry should not be worn.
  • Wear steel-toed shoes to help protect your feet. NO OPEN TOED SHOES!
  • Wear a respirator if you need to.
question7
Question

A respirator is a:

  • Type of chemical burn
  • Machine guard
  • Filter mask
  • Battery guard device
    • C = Filter mask
question8
Question
  • Which of these is not a good tip when dressing for work?
  • Roll up long sleeve shirts
  • Make sure all jewelry fits well and is secure from getting caught in machines
  • Secure long hair
  • Do not carry sharp tools in your pocket
    • A = Sleeves can roll down – get caught
question9
Question
  • When working in the automotive shop, never:
  • Wear rings of other jewelry around the wrists, hands or long chains around neck, etc.
  • Use compressed air to remove dirt from clothing
  • Use tools that are in need of repair or broken
  • All of the above
    • D= all of the above
fire hazards and prevention
Fire Hazards and Prevention
  • Fuels used in modern ICE are highly volatile and require proper handling and storage.
  • Diesel fuel is not as refined and contain active micro-organisms that can cause infections.
  • Cleaning solvents and shop rags must be stored and handled properly to prevent fires.
fire safety
Fire Safety
  • Make sure fire extinguishers are accessible and maintained.
  • Do not fight a fire that is too large to control. Get out of the building.
classes of fires
Classes of Fires
  • Class “A” fires
    • Ordinary combustibles such as wood, paper, and plastics.
  • Class “B” fires
    • Flammable liquids such as gasoline, oil, grease, and paint.
classes of fires cont d
Classes of Fires (cont’d)
  • Class “C” fires
    • Electrical equipment such as electric motors, wiring, and fuse boxes.
  • Class “D” fires
    • Combustible metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and potassium.
slide44

Fire extinguishers can be

Class A, B, C, or D. Many are ABC or multipurpose extinguishers

Most use “Dry Chemical”

question10
Question
  • Technician A says class A fires consist of burning liquid. Technician B says water should be used to extinguish class B fires. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • D = Neither Technicians
steps in using a fire extinguisher
Steps in Using a Fire Extinguisher

1. Pull pin from handle.

2. Aim nozzle at base of fire.

3. Squeeze handle.

4. Sweep entire width of fire.

question11
QUESTION
  • Which of the following is not recommended for use when trying to extinguish flammable liquid fires?
  • Foam
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Water
  • Dry Chemical
    • C - Water
question12
Question
  • Technician A says a dry chemical fire extinguisher can be used on class A, B and C fires. Technician B says the chemical used in these fire extinguishers can be corrosive. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
question13
Question
  • What is the correct procedure for using a fire extinguisher to put out a fire?
  • Pull
  • Aim
  • Squeeze
  • Sweep
question14
Question
  • Technician A says that water based fire extinguishers remove oxygen from the fire. Technician B says that CO2 fire extinguishers remove oxygen from the fire. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • B = Technician B only
fire safety continued
Fire Safety(continued)
  • Store oily rags in a covered container.
  • Store gasoline safely in an approved container.
hazardous materials
Hazardous Materials
  • Always read the label and MSDS before using unfamiliar substances.
  • Be familiar with the dangers of various substances used in the shop.
  • Follow all environmental policies for proper disposal.
question15
Question
  • Technician A says solvents with a flash point below 140 degrees F are combustible. Technician B says solvents with a flash point above 140 degrees F are flammable. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
gasoline is
Gasoline is:
  • Highly flammable
  • Volatile – heavier than air (fumes to ground)
  • Needs oxygen to burn
  • MUST be stored in approved container
  • Container should be “red” in color
  • Never smoke around open containers
  • Rags soaked in gas should be taken outside to dry before you dispose of them
  • Provide proper ventilation
question16
Question
  • Technician A says all gasoline containers should be OSHA approved and painted red. Technician B says the MSDS contains information about health and safety concerns associated with chemicals used in the shop. Who is correct?
  • Technician A
  • Technician B
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
question17
Question
  • Rules to remember when using gasoline include each of the following EXCEPT:
  • Use quick dry to absorb any spills
  • Store gasoline in approved containers
  • Keep gasoline away from sources of heat
  • Never use gasoline as a cleaning solvent
    • A = Don’t use quick dry to absorb fuel – the quick dry may become flammable.
question18
Question
  • Technician A says all metal gasoline containers are considered safety cans. Technician B says all gasoline containers should be red in color. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • B = B Technician only
question19
QUESTION
  • Where can complete EPA lists of hazardous wastes be found?
    • Code of Federal Regulations
  • Gasoline is ____________
  • highly volatile
  • highly flammable
  • dangerous, especially in vapor form
  • All of the above
    • D – All of the above
question20
QUESTION
  • Technician A says that the volatility of a substance is a statement of how easily the substance vaporizes or explodes. Technician B says that the flammability of a substance is a statement of how well the substance supports combustion. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C – Both Technicians
breathing safety
Breathing Safety

Take precautions against breathing:

  • Paint fumes.
  • Asbestos.
  • Cleaning chemicals.
  • Grinding dust.
  • Vehicle exhaust.
asbestos
Asbestos
  • Identified as a health hazard
  • Can lead to cancer – mesothelioma
  • When breathed, fibers can cause scarring of the lung tissue
  • All asbestos waste must be disposed of in accordance with OSHA and EPA regulations
question21
Question
  • Technician A says that asbestos is found in some brake pad materials. Technician B says that asbestos is found in some clutch materials. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
question22
Question
  • When removing asbestos from parts, Technician A believes a vacuum system should be used. Technicians B believes dust should be blown away using compressed air. Who is correct?
  • Technician A
  • Technician B
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • A= Use vacuum with hepa filter
question23
Question
  • Technician A says that asbestos is found in some brake pad materials. Technician B says that asbestos is found in some clutch materials. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
question24
Question
  • Technician A says wet asbestos is known as hazardous waste. Technician B says dry asbestos is known as solid waste. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • B= B Technician only
question25
Question
  • Technician A says all brake and clutch linings should be treated as if they contain asbestos. Technician B says a HEPA filtration vacuum is acceptable to clean brake assemblies before service. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
question26
Question
  • Technician A says a visual inspection can determine if brake linings contain asbestos. Technician B says it is OK to blow brake dust with compressed air. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • D = Neither Technician
question27
Question
  • Technician A says brake fluid is hazardous after is has been contaminated with metals from the brake system. Technician B says to dispose of used brake fluid in a special container. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
question28
Question
  • Technician A says used brake fluid can be poured down the sewage drain. Technician B says brake fluid can be mixed with used engine oil for recycling. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • D = Neither Technician
things to watch for
Things to watch for
  • CO = Carbon Monoxide
    • Colorless, tasteless, odorless, can kill
    • Provide proper ventilation
  • H2O = Water (Hydrogen and Oxygen)
  • HC = Hydrocarbon – fuel
  • Nox = Oxides of Nitrogen
    • Produced under high combustion temperatures
  • Photochemical smog = A condition that develops when oxides of nitrogen and volatile organic compounds created from fossil fuel combustion interact under the influence of sunlight to produce a mixture of hundreds of different chemicals
question29
Question
  • Photochemical smog is created when ______ mixes with N0x and HC emissions.
  • CO
  • Particulates
  • Sunlight
  • Smog
    • C - sunlight
question30
Question
  • Which of the following is not a measurement used to monitor pollution?
  • Grams per mile of operation
  • Revolutions per minute
  • Parts per million
  • Micrograms per cubic meter
    • B – Revolutions per minute (RPM)
hybrid vehicle safety
HYBRID VEHICLE SAFETY
  • Various systems
  • Can be very high voltage (over 300 AC)
  • Must use the proper safety equipment
  • Read warning labels
  • High voltage wires are ORANGE
slide76

The high-voltage battery pack produces 244 volts and consists of 34 nickel metal hydride modules, each of which contains six 1.2-volt cells. The battery pack is located behind the rear passenger seat backs.

question31
Question
  • Technician A says to use lineman’s gloves when servicing the high voltage system on hybrid electric vehicles. Technician B says hybrid vehicles have a plug to disable the high voltage system before service. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
battery safety
Battery Safety
  • Avoid sparks around batteries, as they contain explosive hydrogen gas.
  • Remove the battery ground cable first and connect it last.
slide81

The Fatal Current

Strange as it may seem, most fatal electric shocks happen to people who should know better.

Here are some electro-medical facts that should make you think twice before taking that last chance.

slide82

It's The Current That Kills

Offhand it would seem that a shock of 10,000 volts would be more deadly than 100 volts. But this is not so! Individuals have been electrocuted by currents of 110 volts and by as little as 12 volts direct current.

The real measure of shock's intensity lies in the amount of current (amperes) forced though the body, and not the voltage.

Any electrical device used on an automobile, under certain conditions, can transmit a fatal current.

slide83

It's The Current That Kills

While any amount of current over 10 milliamps (0.01 amp) is capable of producing painful to severe shock, currents between 100 and

200 mA (0.1 to 0.2 amp) are lethal.

Currents above 200 milliamps (0.2 amp), while producing severe burns and unconsciousness, do not usually cause death if the victim is given immediate attention.

slide84

It's The Current That Kills

From a practical viewpoint, after a person is knocked out by an electrical shock it is impossible to tell how much current has passed through the vital organs of his body.

Artificial respiration must be applied immediately if breathing has stopped.

question32
Question
  • Technician A says lead acid batteries may be disposed of in landfills. Technician B says all automotive battery retailers must post a sign with a recycling symbol visible to customers. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • B = B Technician only
question33
Question
  • Which of the following is a possible source of explosion in the automotive shop?
  • Welding tanks
  • Fuel tanks
  • Car Batteries
  • All of the above
    • D = all of the above
electrical shock
Electrical Shock
  • Most shop equipment operates on 110 or 220 volts.
  • Turn off tools before unplugging.
caution

CAUTION

Electric Cooling fans can start at any time – on their own!

electrical shock continued
Electrical Shock(continued)
  • Make sure electrical cords are in good condition.
  • Plugs need to be the three-prong type.
machinery safety
Machinery Safety
  • Do not disturb anyone who is operating machinery.
  • Do not talk to others while you are operating machinery.
  • Use common sense.
grinding
Grinding
  • Wear full face shield.
  • Make sure the tool rest is adjusted properly.
  • Do not grind on the side of the wheel.
drilling
Drilling
  • Bits can break.
  • Chips of metal are constantly present.
  • Do not hold work in your hand.
  • Wear eye protection.
hand tools
Hand Tools
  • Make sure the tool is in good condition.
  • Pull a wrench or ratchet towards you; never push.
  • Regrind worn chisels.
creepers
CREEPERS
  • Don’t leave creepers on the floor – laying flat –
    • Somebody could accidentally stand on it and go flying!
    • ALWAYS STORE STANDING UP
welding equipment
Welding Equipment
  • Make sure appropriate helmet is worn.
  • Protective gloves and clothing are needed to protect against hot metal particles.
safety around automobiles
Safety Around Automobiles
  • Make sure the customer’s car is safe before test driving.
  • Drive slowly around facility
  • Hybrid vehicles may not make noise – watch OUT!
  • Use caution around rotating belts and pulleys.
shop habits
Shop Habits
  • Common sense is your best protection.
  • A clean shop is also a safer shop.
toxic materials and chemicals
Toxic Materials and Chemicals
  • Asbestos is not banned from imported brake linings.
  • Take appropriate measures to avoid breathing any brake or clutch dust.
  • Even non-asbestos linings have dangerous materials.
skin protection
Skin Protection
  • Wear nitrile gloves to help protect against chemicals used in the shop.
  • Some chemicals are absorbed directly into the skin.
solvents
Solvents
  • There are many dangerous solvents involved during work in the shop.
  • Consult the MSDS for appropriate precautions and first aid before using any chemical.
question34
Question
  • Technician A says major sources of chemical dangers are from solvents containing chlorinated hydro fluorocarbons. Technician B says the EPA banned production of some of these solvents because they have proven harmful to the earth’s ozone layer. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • C = Both Technicians
question35
Question
  • Technician A says solvents currently in use in a parts washer must always be labeled. Technician B says Safety Kleen is a vendor that recycles and disposes of used solvent. Who is correct?
  • Technician A only
  • Technician B only
  • Both Technicians A and B
  • Neither Technician A nor B
    • B = B Technician only