Download
industrial relations n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

482 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

  2. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS Back ground and framework of industrial Relations

  3. Introduction • Concept of IR originated in the USA in the early 20th century. • It soon extended to Great Britain • It entered public discourse in 1912 in the aftermath of violent industrial conflicts

  4. Introduction • IR became known as the processes and institutions through which employment is managed, such as trade unions and employers’ associations, collective negotiations, labour legislation and organized conflict.

  5. Introduction • IR became known as the processes and institutions through which employment is managed, such as trade unions and employers’ associations, collective negotiations, labour legislation and organized conflict.

  6. Introduction • It provided the basis for academic research and teaching. • Some writers: • Labour and trade unions were regarded as positive forces for social improvement. • Their perspectives converged with progressive employers.

  7. Introduction • Their common belief was that social peace could be encouraged by a better understanding of the sources of industrial conflictand the mechanics of collective regulation.

  8. Model of Industrial Relations • Early writers on IR came from a variety of backgrounds. • As the study became increasingly institutionalized it became a study in its own right. • A most notable writer was John Thomas Dunlop Industrial Relations System appeared in 1958

  9. Model of Industrial Relations • For Dunlop the defining characteristics were • The full range of rule makinggoverning the workplace. • Analysis of the rulesof employment. John Thomas Dunlop

  10. Model of Industrial Relations • For Dunlop the defining characteristics were • The actors (employers, workers and their organizations and governments) involves in their formation and administration John Thomas Dunlop

  11. Model of Industrial Relations • For Dunlop the defining characteristics were • The Contextual Influences (economic, technological and political) required a distinctive theoretical apparatus which identified industrial relations as a separate discipline. John Thomas Dunlop

  12. Model of Industrial Relations • JD’s Model was 1st published in 1958 and revised in 1993 John Thomas Dunlop

  13. Model of Industrial Relations • It defines IR as the field defined by the study of interaction between: • Workers, • Employers, • Their Associations • and The State. John Thomas Dunlop

  14. Model of Industrial Relations • The interactions take places against the background of several variables: • Technology • The design of work • Power relations within society at large. John Thomas Dunlop

  15. Model of Industrial Relations • The system is kept in tact by shared ideology, • Its product is the norms that govern • The Employment Relationship • and the Labour Market John Thomas Dunlop

  16. Model of Industrial Relations • The IR system is Flexible and can be applied at: • Enterprise • Domestic • Occupational and Sectoral • National • And International Level John Thomas Dunlop

  17. Model of Industrial Relations • IR system as a distinct subset of the Economic System and separate of the Political System. Economic System John Thomas Dunlop

  18. Model of Industrial Relations • Criticisms of JD IR System: • The assumption of shared a ideology driving the system rather than power and conflict was excessive. John Thomas Dunlop

  19. Model of Industrial Relations • Criticisms of JD IR System: • The separation of the industrial relations systemfrom the other systems namely the political system, was problematic. John Thomas Dunlop

  20. Properties of John Dunlop’s Model • Model which explains why particular rules are established. • How and why they change in response to changes

  21. Properties of John Dunlop’s Model • Argument – IR is a discipline in its own right • It is related to economics and to social systems in general.

  22. Properties of John Dunlop’s Model • He envisaged the following: • Regulated relationships at the workplace as a social product. • Concerns with analysis at the level of the individual or even the primary group

  23. Properties of John Dunlop’s Model • The main elements of the Model are: • Interrelatedness of institutions and behaviour. • Rules that govern the relationship between actors and institutions.

  24. The Impact of Dunlop’s Work • Dominated IR Research for decades • It became the starting point from which most other influential commentators proceeded.

  25. The Impact of Dunlop’s Work • There was no difficulty in appreciating the impact of his work. • It provided a mechanism for grounding the subject area.

  26. The Impact of Dunlop’s Work • It enabled the movement away from the narrow concentration on collective bargaining. • It enabled the claim that IR as a discipline in its own right

  27. The Impact of Dunlop’s Work • He developed the thinking of Industrial Relations as having a theoretical core through the study of the Industrial Relations Systems.

  28. The Impact of Dunlop’s Work • NOTE • Views the IR System as a subsystem of the wider society or the total social system. • It is seen as providing certain essential influences and constraints • IR System is regarded as comprising actors, context & ideology • They bind the IR Systems together and a body of rules created to govern the actors at the place of work

  29. The Creation of Rules • The creation of rules is seen to be the central aim of the Industrial Relations System IR Rules

  30. The Creation of Rules • There three (3) groups of actors who take part in the rule making process. • Managers and their supervisors. • Non-managerial workers and their Spokesmen. • Specialized government agencies and specialized private agencies

  31. Impact of the Environment on the Industrial Relations System • Impacts are • Technological aspects of the work place. • Markets and budgetary constraints • The focus and distribution of power in the larger society.

  32. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

  33. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS Back ground and framework of industrial Relations

  34. gtistudents.wordpress.com

  35. Click Follow

  36. Type in Email Address

  37. Confirmation message

  38. Go to email to confirm

  39. Confirmation on Website

  40. Confirmation Email

  41. Model of Allan Flanders • Allan Flanders (1910-1973) • Member of the Oxford School of Industrial Relations. • Developed a particular institutional approach to the analysis of industrial relations. • Published “The System of Industrial Relations in Great Britain” (1954)

  42. Model of Allan Flanders • Other Contributions • The design of State Income Policy, • The reform of Collective Bargaining, • Productivity Bargaining • And his impact of the Donovan Report of the UK in 1968.

  43. Model of Allan Flanders • Alan Flanders furthered the work of Dunlop • He focused on • Why management on the whole is slow to innovate labour relations and have little to do with labour relations?

  44. Model of Allan Flanders • He believed that • An immense amount of experimenting and education was needed about changes in management methods and outlook that he considered necessary.

  45. Model of Allan Flanders • He believed that • An immense amount of experimenting and education was needed about changes in management methods and outlook that he considered necessary.

  46. Model of Allan Flanders • He believed that • An Industrial Relations System required that ideology be sufficiently compatible and consistent, so as to commit a common set of ideas which recognizes an acceptable role for each other.

  47. Model of Allan Flanders • He claimed that • “Voluntarism” is in a way common to all actors, and prescribed a limited role for specialized public agencies.

  48. Marxist Approach to Industrial Relations • The Marxist approach to the study of Industrial Relations is rooted in the theory of conflict founded by Karl Marx.

  49. Marxist Approach to Industrial Relations • Conflict theory is based on the premisethat: • Conflict exists in society and in organization, • It is essential to reorganize this and have a framework to deal with it.

  50. Marxist Approach to Industrial Relations • Marx argues that conflict arises in organizations because of different values and interests,