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Southwest Ohio 2014 Data Workshops Using HSTW Assessment Data to Take Action Career Centers Mike Ross HSTW/MMGW Ohio Data Consultant Susanne Davis HSTW/MMGW Ohio Assessment Coordinator. Workshop Objectives. Understand components of the HSTW Assessment Report

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slide1
Southwest Ohio2014 Data WorkshopsUsing HSTW Assessment Data to Take ActionCareer CentersMike Ross HSTW/MMGW Ohio Data ConsultantSusanne DavisHSTW/MMGW Ohio Assessment Coordinator
workshop objectives
Workshop Objectives
  • Understand components of the HSTW Assessment Report
  • Identify gaps in student achievement and instructional practices
  • Identify new challenges
  • Link key Assessment data to the Site Review Process (SRP)
  • Explore how Assessment data may provide critical baseline or “readiness” levels for implementing common core state standards
hstw key practices
HSTWHSTW Key Practices
  • High Expectations
  • Program of Study
  • Academic Studies
  • Career/Technical Studies
  • Work-Based Learning
  • Teachers Working Together
  • Students Actively Engaged
  • Guidance
  • Extra Help
  • Culture of Continuous Improvement
why are data important
Why Are Data Important?
  • Replace hunches with facts
  • Enable us to tackle root causes instead of symptoms
  • Enable us to determine if we are accurately tracking effects
  • Assist in understanding how school and classroom practices impact achievement
data can t help when
Data Can’t Help When…
  • The data are not valid or reliable
  • The appropriate questions are not asked after reviewing the data
  • Data analysis is not used for making wise decisions
  • There is no commitment by teachers and administrators to change school and classroom practices when data indicate the need for change

Make conscious efforts to develop a data-rich culture at your school!

multiple measures
Multiple Measures

Based on Victoria Bernhardt’s Multiple Measures Model

categories of data
Categories of Data

“Measures of student learning help us understand

how students are performing and what students

know as a result of instruction.

Student

Achievement

Based on Victoria Bernhardt’s Multiple Measures Model

categories of data1
Categories of Data

School

Processes

“…programs, practices, and instructional strategies…that produce school and classroom results.”

Based on Victoria Bernhardt’s Multiple Measures Model

categories of data2
Categories of Data

Perceptions

“A particular view, judgment, or appraisal formed in the

mind about a particular matter...a belief stronger than impression and less strong than positive knowledge.”

Based on Victoria Bernhardt’s Multiple Measures Model

categories of data3
Categories of Data

“Statistical characteristics of human populations…builds the context of the school …for which change is planned and takes place.”

Demographics

Based on Victoria Bernhardt’s Multiple Measures Model

comparisons of assessments to oaa ogt
HSTWComparisonsof Assessments to OAA/OGT

HSTW Assessment

  • Based on NAEP Standards
  • 3 areas
  • Administered to 12th graders
  • Content through grade 12
  • Multiple choice

OGT/OAA

  • Based on Ohio standards
  • 2 to 5 areas
  • Administered (initially) to 3rd through 10th graders
  • OGT – through gr. 10
  • Multiple choice & constructed response
comparisons of assessments to oaa ogt1
HSTWComparisonsof Assessments to OAA/OGT

HSTW Assessment

  • Reports Readiness Standards - Generalize to high school and college success
  • Scale scores
  • Cut scores/ Proficiency Levels
  • Random Sample
  • Others?

OGT/OAA

  • Not predictive of college success
  • OGT tied to graduation
  • Scale scores
  • Cut scores/ Proficiency Levels
  • All students
  • Others?
2014 hstw assessment ohio career center participation
2014 HSTW AssessmentOhio Career Center Participation

2014 HSTW Assessment

32 Ohio CTC sites

1,820 Ohio CTC 12th grade students

1,225 Ohio teachers (574 academic and

651 career/technical)

32 hstw ohio career centers 2014
32 HSTW Ohio Career Centers (2014)

SW OHIO (12 sites)

  • Butler Tech Natural Science Center
  • D. Russell Lee Career Tech. Center
  • Diamond Oaks Career Development Center
  • Greene County Career Center
  • Laurel Oaks Career Development Center
  • Live Oaks Career Development Center
  • Miami Valley Career Center
  • Ponitz Career Center
  • Scarlet Oaks Career Development Center
  • Southern Hills Joint Vocational School
  • Springfield-Clark Career Tech Center
  • Warren County Career Center
32 hstw ohio career centers 20141
32 HSTW Ohio Career Centers (2014)

NE OHIO (9 sites)

  • Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center
  • Buckeye Career Center
  • Columbiana County Career Center
  • Cuyahoga Valley Career Center
  • Jefferson County JVS
  • Mahoning County Career Center
  • Trumbull Career Center
  • Wayne County Career Center
  • Youngstown-Choffin Career Center
32 hstw ohio career centers 20142
32 HSTW Ohio Career Centers (2014)

C/SE OHIO (7 sites)

  • C-TEC of Licking County
  • Collins Career Center
  • Delaware Area Career Center
  • Mid East Career and Tech. Center -Buffalo
  • Mid East Career and Tech. Center -Zanesville
  • Pickaway Ross JVSD
  • Tolles Career & Technical Center

NW OHIO (4 sites)

  • Four County Career Center
  • Penta Career Center
  • Pioneer Career & Technology Center
  • Vantage Career Center
approaching the report
Approaching the Report
  • Before analyzing data, ask yourself “who participated in this assessment?”
    • Random sample or all students?
    • Career/technical or all students?
    • Who completed the assessment?
      • Pages 62, 71, 86, 97 of High School assessment report
    • What is your H.S. category? – A, B, C, D

Refer to top left of each page and

descriptions on page iv.

high school standard setting readiness standards
High School Standard Setting – Readiness Standards

Students performing at this level or above are able to enter postsecondary studies without needing additional preparation and/or are able to pass most employer exams for entry-level jobs.

slide20
2014 HSTW Assessment Results -Ohio Career Centers

HSTW Goal = 85%

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, pg.1

20

2014 hstw assessment results all ohio career centers
2014 HSTW Assessment Results -All Ohio Career Centers

54%

52%

53%

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, pg.1

21

main summary reports
Main Summary Reports
  • Now that we know who participated and how Ohio students performed, how did yourschool do overall?
  • H.S. - Executive Summary, pp. 1-2
key indicators of student achievement or power indicators report page 2

Key Indicators of Student Achievementor Power Indicators (report page 2)

12 Student and 6 Teacher Indicators

Associated with very high mean scores

ETS has found these indicators to be statisticallypredictiveof student achievement

activity time
HSTWActivity Time

High School - Utilizing the Executive Summary & Analyzing Differences

  • Report pp. 1-12
  • Workbook pp. 4-7

(Handout #1)

activity processing
Activity Processing
  • What value do these data provide?
  • How can you use this executive summary and other features in the reports in planning at your school?
more information
More Information
  • Now that we’ve gotten a picture of overall performance, where can I get some more details?
    • Executive Summary – pp. 1-2
    • Overview – pp. 3-24
semantics
Semantics

Indicator

Index or indices (pl.)

Common meanings and distinctions

32

our definition
“Our Definition”

Indicator –

a student experience(s) and/or improvement strategy(ies) that are associated with higher levels of student achievement

33

definition
Definition

Examples of Indicators

Used a graphing calculator in math assignments at least weekly.

Prepared a written report of science lab results at least monthly.

Used computer skills to complete an assignment or project in C/T classes at least weekly.

34

definition1
Definition

Index –

A scale that combines multiple items into a single value.

Each index is built around a common theme which HSTW believes is a key element of student achievement.

35

be mindful
…be mindful

“Although we cannot prove a causal connection between the indices and student test performance, it can be said that faithful adherence to the Key Practices is associatedwith better student achievement.”

36

understanding the indices
Understanding the Indices
  • Based on the HSTW Key Practices
    • Example – Literacy Across the Curriculum
  • A series of indicators (and frequency) are identified for each practice
    • Example – Students often revised their essays or other written work several times to improve their quality
  • The number of indicators experienced determines the level of emphasis
    • Example – Intensive = 8-10 indicators
slide39
High School Indicator Data

(source: 2014 All Ohio Career Center Composite, p. 26)

activity time a more detailed picture of your school s performance
HSTWActivity TimeA More Detailed Picture of Your School’s Performance

High School –

Utilizing the Overview & the HSTW Indices

  • Report pp. 1 & 13-23
  • Workbook pp. 8-10

(Handout #2)

share
Share
  • On what three categories of indicators did most of your students report an intensive emphasis?
  • What actions did you take that may account for these results?
  • What challenges did you identify by looking at these data?
slide43
HSTW

Key Practice:Continuous Improvement Use student achievement and program evaluation data to continuously improve school culture, organization, management, curriculum and instruction to advance student learning.

teachers perception on continuous school improvement percentage who strongly agree
Teachers’ Perception on Continuous School ImprovementPercentage Who StronglyAgree

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.57

teachers perception on continuous school improvement percentage who strongly agree1
Teachers’ Perception on Continuous School ImprovementPercentage Who StronglyAgree

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio CTC Composite, p.57

46

activity time1
HSTWActivity Time

High School – Leadership & Continuous Improvement

  • Report pp. 187, 198, 201, 210-213
  • Workbook pp. 11-13

(Handout #3)

engaging instruction

Engaging Instruction

…a key to ensuring rigorous and challenging learning experiences

key practice
Key Practice

Engage students in academic and career/technical classrooms in rigorous and challenging assignments using research-based instructional strategies and technology.

sreb literacy goals
SREB Literacy Goals

Students will read the equivalent of 25 books per year across the curriculum.

Students will write weekly in all classes.

Students will use reading and writing strategies to help them understand and use the content of all classes.

Students will write investigative research papers in all classes.

Students will be taught as if they were in honors language arts classes.

actions for engaging students in research based instructional strategies
Actions for Engaging Students in Research-Based Instructional Strategies

Project- or Problem-based learning

Cooperative learning

Student-designed research

Integrated, interdisciplinary studies

Integrating technology

Effective direct instruction

literacy across the curriculum or engaging literacy refer to p 14 h s for complete lists
Literacy Across the Curriculum or Engaging Literacy –Refer to p.14 H.S. for complete lists

EXAMPLES OF INDICATORS

They oftenrevised their essays or other written work several times to improve their quality.

They completed short-writing assignments of one to three pages for which they received a grade in their English classes at least monthly.

They read an assigned book and demonstrated understanding of the significance of the main ideas at least monthly.

They stood before the class and made an oral presentation on a project or assignment to meet specific quality requirements at least once a semester.

literacy across the curriculum
Literacy Across the Curriculum

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.1

literacy across the curriculum1
Literacy Across the Curriculum

Source: 2014 HSTWAssessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.14

literacy in all classes
Literacy in All Classes

Choose texts for students that are demanding enough to help develop strong reading skills

Work with students directly in mastering texts - this is how students learn how to learn in each subject

Students need more experiences in reading complex materials, analyzing texts, discussing what they read, and writing reports based on their reading.

activity time literacy
Activity Time - Literacy

High School – Engaging Instruction

Report pp. 47-48, 77-84, 104 & 132

Workbook pp. 14-15

(Handout #4)

Career Centers –

Quality Career Tech

Report pp. 44-45, 92, 103, 110-112, 132, 154, 116-120

Workbook pp. 20-21 (Handout #5)

HSTW

56

engaging numeracy across the curriculum refer to p 15 h s for complete lists
Engaging Numeracy Across the Curriculum–Refer to p.15 H.S. for complete lists

EXAMPLES OF INDICATORS

They used math in classes other than mathematicsat least monthly.

Their mathematics teachers sometimes or often showed how mathematics concepts are used to solve problems in real-life situations.

They oftendeveloped and analyzed tables, charts and graphs in their school work.

They solved mathematics problems other than those found in the textbookat least monthly.

They used a graphing calculator to complete mathematics assignmentsat least weekly.

numeracy across the curriculum
Numeracy Across the Curriculum

Source: 2014 HSTWAssessment – Ohio CTC Composite, p.1

numeracy across the curriculum1
Numeracy Across the Curriculum

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.15

9 actions to build students math abilities
9 Actions to Build Students’ Math Abilities

Develop students’ fluency in the language of mathematics.

Help students find a purpose for mathematics.

Teach students to organize and classify mathematics information.

Help students gain a thorough understanding of fractions, decimals and percentages.

Use multiple representations of information.

9 actions to build students math abilities contd
9 Actions to Build Students’ Math Abilities (contd.)

Develop students’ understanding of appropriate applications of technology in mathematics.

Emphasize the role of mathematics in the workplace and real world.

Help students find a problem-solving strategy.

Foster students’ confidence in and appreciation for mathematics.

activity time numeracy
Activity Time - Numeracy

High School – Engaging Instruction

Report pp. 48-49, 92-95, 131

Workbook pp. 16-17

(HS Handout #4)

Career Centers –

Integrating Academic Content and Skills into Career/Technical Courses

Report pp. 53-54, 115-120

Workbook pp. 22-23 (Handout #5)

HSTW

62

engaging science curriculum and instruction refer to p 16 h s for complete lists
Engaging Science Curriculum and Instruction–Refer to p.16 H.S. for complete lists

EXAMPLES OF INDICATORS

Their science teachers oftenshowed how scientific concepts are used to solve problems in real-life situations.

They used science equipment to do science activities in a classroomor laboratory at least weekly.

They used computers or technology to do science activitiesat least monthly.

They prepared a written report of their lab resultsat least monthly.

They participated in a classroom discussion relating science to everyday lifeat least monthly. (Similar)

They worked with other students in their class on a challenging science assignment or projectat least monthly.

engaging science
Engaging Science

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.1

engaging science1
Engaging Science

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.16

how can you improve the quality of instruction
How can you improve the quality of instruction?
  • Focus on improving professional practice
    • Common planning time
      • Integrating
      • Common unit planning, syllabi, exams, etc.
    • Peer observations
    • Demonstration classrooms
    • Professional development and follow-up
    • Team teaching
    • Teacher evaluation; annual plans for improvement
activity time science
Activity Time - Science

High School – Engaging Instruction

Report pp. 49-50, 104-108

HS Handout #4

Career Centers –

Work-Based Learning

Report pp. 45-46, 176-183

Workbook pp. 24-25

(Handout #5)

HSTW

67

share1
Share

What does this type of data tell us about quality instruction in our schools?

How can these data be used to impact student achievement?

What actions can be taken to increase the quality of instruction?

key practices
Key Practices

Provide more students access to intellectually challenging career/technical studies in high-demand fields that emphasize the higher-level mathematics, science, literacy and problem-solving skills needed in the workplace and in further education.

Enable students and their parents to choose from programs that integrate challenging high school studies and work-based learning and are planned by educators, employers and students.

a broader definition of rigor
A Broader Definition of Rigor

Application-based learning of academic knowledge and skills through authentic problems, projects and tasks in career fields of interest

Problem-based learning that develops students’ ability to learn and use academic knowledge in the context of a problem that interests them

Depth-based learning that provides opportunities for students to explore certain topics of interest and gain greater depth of understanding

a broader definition of rigor1
A Broader Definition of Rigor

Blended programs of academic and CT studies that graduate more students prepared for college and careers, including the combination of work and further study

Alternative assessments — in subjects other than reading, writing and math — that measure how well students handle complex materials, including approved industry-certification exams, readiness assessments for postsecondary study, school-evaluated senior projects, or portfolios evaluated using a state-developed scoring guide.

making ct courses intellectually demanding
Making CT Courses Intellectually Demanding

Embed reading, writing and mathematics standards essential for students who will pursue college or career studies

Develop instructional materials and a syllabus for the course

Blend academic and technical content through authentic projects

Align course content with college- and career-readiness standards

making ct courses intellectually demanding1
Making CT Courses Intellectually Demanding
  • Courses should require students to
    • do substantial reading and reflective writing in the career field
    • describe orally what they learn through class projects, problem-solving activities and laboratory work
    • develop analytical thinking skills
quality ct studies 8 indicators
Quality CT Studies - 8 Indicators

They took a mathematics course during their senior year.

They took a science course during their senior year.

They were encouraged to take a combination of academic and career/technical courses.

They completed a senior project that included researching a topic, creating a product or performing a service and presenting it to the class or others.

quality ct studies 8 indicators contd
Quality CT Studies - 8 Indicators (contd.)

They had challenging assignments in their career/technical classesat least monthly.

They completed a project that first required some research and a written plan before completing the task in their career/technical classes at least once a semester.

They used computer software or other technology related to their career/technical area to complete assignments at least weekly.

They made journal or lab manual entries that recorded their class work in their career/technical classes at least weekly.

quality ct studies
Quality CT Studies

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.1

quality ct studies1
Quality CT Studies

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.19

integrating academics into ct studies 8 indicators
Integrating Academics into CT Studies - 8 Indicators

They read and interpreted technical books and manuals to complete assignments in their career/technical classes at least weekly.

They read a career-related article and demonstrated understanding of the content in their career/technical classes at least monthly.

They used computer skills to complete an assignment or project in their career/technical classesat least weekly.

They used mathematics to complete challenging assignments in their career/technical classesat least weekly.

integrating academics into ct studies 8 indicators contd
Integrating Academics into CT Studies - 8 Indicators (contd.)

Their career/technical teachers sometimes or often stressed reading.

Their career/technical teachers sometimes or often stressed writing.

Their career/technical teachers often stressed mathematics.

Their career/technical teachers often stressed science.

integrating academics into ct studies
Integrating Academics into CT Studies

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.1

integrating academics into ct studies1
Integrating Academics into CT Studies

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.18

conditions for supporting integration
Conditions for Supporting Integration

Common planning time

Standards-based, not activity-based

Create organizational structure that will support teacher collaboration

Provide large blocks of instructional time for completion of complex tasks

Provide professional development to support teachers

Establish clear expectations for teachers; collaboration by invitation does not work

how was your wbl sample identified
How was your WBL sample identified?
  • Students who reported working during the school year and answer “yes” to:

Is this job part of a formal work or training program organized through your school?

A. Yes, it is a co-operative learning program (co-op)

B. Yes, it is an apprenticeship

C. Yes, it is an internship

D. Yes, it is part of Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG)

E. No

  • See pg. 33 for the number of students from your site counted as WBL.
  • Take caution in drawing conclusions if number of students is small.
quality work based learning 9 indicators
Quality Work-Based Learning - 9 Indicators

They observed veteran workers performing certain jobs.

They had someone teach them how to do the work.

They received school credit for their work experience.

Their employers encouraged them to develop good work habitsat least monthly.

Their employers encouraged them in their academic studies at schoolat least monthly.

quality work based learning 9 indicators contd
Quality Work-Based Learning - 9 Indicators (contd.)

Their employers encouraged them to develop good customer relations skillsat least monthly.

Their employers encouraged them to develop good teamwork skillsat least monthly.

Their employers showed them to how use communication skills (reading, writing, speaking) in job-related activitiesat least monthly.

Their employers showed them how to use mathematics in job-related activitiesat least monthly.

work based learning
Work-Based Learning

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.1

work based learning1
Work-Based Learning

Source: 2014 HSTW Assessment – Ohio Career Centers Composite, p.20

slide90
HSTW Data ToolCompares your site 2012 & 2014 vs. All Ohio Career Centers vs. All HSTW Siteshstwohioregions.org“Assessments” Tab2014 Data Tools – Ohio Career Centers
slide91

Improvement Plansand ProcessesSite Action Plans (SAP)CCIPOIPSite Review Process (SRP)Work from one plan!

next steps how to use the assessment report
Next Steps:How to Use the Assessment Report
  • Show the “positives”
  • Identify the challenges
    • Use state assessment & HSTW/MGA report findings that explain why
    • What actions can you take to change that?
  • Walk through the report
    • Identify strengths and weaknesses
    • Identify improvement actions
  • Develop plan to share findings with the faculty and other stakeholders
next steps identify and prioritize actions
Next Steps: Identify and Prioritize Actions
  • List areas in need of improvement
    • Rank items based on impact on student achievement and completion rates.
  • Identify short-term goals
    • Implementation in the first year
    • Have one item in each of the four areas of structural, instructional, support and leadership change
  • Identify long-term goals
    • Implementation in years two and three
    • Have one item in each of the four areas of structural, instructional, support and leadership change
essentials for moving forward
Essentials for Moving Forward
  • Keep the improvement plan “alive”
  • Keep staff informed and involved
  • Establish necessary structures and processes (committees or focus teams, regular meeting schedules, agendas, and meeting notes)
  • Use resources from SREB, state, and other sites
  • Collect evidence to determine the effectiveness of improvement efforts
  • Make “mid-point” corrections and revise improvement plan at least once a year
  • Develop teacher leaders to make this happen!
website information and workshop documents
Website information and workshop documents:

www.hstwohioregions.org

click “Assessments”

www.sreb.org

click “SREB Programs”

HSTW

contact information
Contact Information
  • Susanne Davis, HSTW SW Ohio

[email protected]

(513) 677-5641

  • Mike Ross, HSTW SW Ohio

[email protected]

(937) 996-4694

  • Missy Kramer, HSTW SW Ohio

[email protected]

(513) 619-2330

  • Fran Cowart, SREB - HSTW

[email protected]

(404) 879-5611

wrapping it all up remember
HSTWWrapping it all up--Remember…

All schools want to improve but few want to change. The fact remains that to improve, one MUST change.

Remember that if nothing changes,

nothingchanges!

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