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Organizing and Delivering an

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  1. Organizing and Delivering an Informative Speech

  2. Objectives Identify the features of an informative speech Write topics appropriate for an informative speech Deliver and develop an effective informative speech Evaluate and critique an informative speech Apply learning and thinking skills, life skills, and ICT literacy in organizing and delivering an informative speech Reflect on your learning on organizing and delivering an informative speech

  3. Types of Informative Speech • There are 4 types of Informative Speeches • which vary depending on the topic. • These are: • > Speech about object or people • > Speech about processes • > Speech about events • > Speech about concepts

  4. Specific Examples Descriptions Types Purposes • This focuses on tangible items like gadgets, products, structures, or people. Visual aids may be necessary. • To inform the audience about your background, interests, and ambitions • To inform the audience about this fictional character’s profile, including his traits and abilities • to inform the audience about the features and capabilities of this new models • Speech about objects or people • Yourself • Sherlock Holmes • New IPhone Model

  5. Specific Examples Descriptions Types Purposes • To inform the audience about the historical and architectural features of the manila Cathedral. • To inform the audience about how first aid for an ankle sprain is administered. • To inform the audience about how a publishable short story is written • Manila Cathedral • First aid • Short story Writing • This focuses on a process or sequence of events. Visual aids are necessary. • Speech about processes

  6. Specific Examples Descriptions Types Purposes • Speech about events • To inform the audience how to take good pictures. • To inform the audience about how basic wed designs are created. • To inform the audience about the impacts of martial law on economy and politics. • To inform the audience about the possibility of Zombie Invasion • Photography • Web Designs • Martial Law • Zombie Invasion • This focuses on an event that happened, is happening, or might happen in the future.

  7. Specific Examples Descriptions Types Purposes • To inform the audience about the details surrounding a car accident. • To inform the audience about cosplay shows and the preparations made by cosplayers and organzer. • To inform the audience about the development of Big Bang Theory. • Speech about concepts • Accident • Cosplay show • Big Bang Theory • This focuses in beliefs, knowledge, theories, principle or ideas.

  8. Specific Examples Descriptions Types Purposes • This focuses in beliefs, knowledge, theories, principle or ideas. • To inform the audience about the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle. • To inform the audience about the advantages or disadvantages of PPP • To inform the audience about a feminist’s perspective on the patriarchal state of the country • Speech about concepts • Bermuda Triangle • Public-Private Partnership (PPP) • Feminism

  9. An informative speech can follow different patterns of organization to arrange and frame the details effectively. A B Spatial/Topical/ Categorical Pattern Chronological Pattern Organizational Pattern c D Cause-Effect Pattern Comparison Contrast

  10. His can be used if you want to present the history, evolution, or development of your topic in a sequential order, from past to present or beginning to end. Chronological Pattern Introduction 1.1 Attention getter 1.2 Thesis statement/ main Point 2. Body 2.1 Step A, Year A, First 2.2 Step B, Year B, Second 2.3 Step C, Year C, Third 2.4 Step D, Year D, Fourth and finally 3. Conclusion 3.1 Summary of the Points 3.2 Memorable Statement EXAMPLE

  11. Spatial/Topical/ Categorical Pattern This can be used if you want to inform your audience about the main features, descriptions, or categories of your topic. Introduction 1.1 Attention getter 1.2 Thesis statement/ main Point 2. Body 2.1 Step A, Description A, First Category 2.2 Step B, Description B, Second Category 2.3 Step C, Description C, Third Category 2.4 Step D, Description D, Fourth and Final Category 3. Conclusion 3.1 Summary of the Points 3.2 Memorable Statement EXAMPLE

  12. Cause-Effect Pattern This can be used if you want to show the casual relationship events or phenomena. Your outline may follow different patterns of organization depending on the relationship between the cause and effect of the event.

  13. Single-Cause-Multiple Effects Single-Effect-Multiple Cause Introduction 1.1 Attention getter 1.2 Thesis statement/ main Point highlighting the cause of an event or phenomenon 2. Body 2.1 Effect A, 2.2 Effect B, 2.3 Effect C, 2.4 Effect D, 3. Conclusion 3.1 Summary of the Points 3.2 Memorable Statement Introduction 1.1 Attention getter 1.2 Thesis statement/ main Point highlighting the cause of an event or phenomenon 2. Body 2.1 Cause A, 2.2 Cause B, 2.3 Cause C, 2.4 Cause t D, 3. Conclusion 3.1 Summary of the Points 3.2 Memorable Statement EXAMPLE

  14. Multiple-Cause-Multiple Effects Domino Effects Introduction 1.1 Attention getter 1.2 Thesis statement/ main Point Stating the multiple cause and effect of an event or phenomenon 2. Body 2.1 Cause A, 2.2 Cause B, 2.3 Cause C, 2.4 Effect A, 2.5 Effect B, 2.6 Effect C, 3. Conclusion 3.1 Summary of the Points 3.2 Memorable Statement Introduction 1.1 Attention getter 1.2 Thesis statement/ main Point Stating the multiple cause and effect of an event or phenomenon 2. Body 2.1 Cause A, 2.2 Effect B, 2.3 Cause C, 2.4 Effect A, 2.5 Cause B, 2.6 Effect C, 3. Conclusion 3.1 Summary of the Points 3.2 Memorable Statement EXAMPLE

  15. Comparison-Contrast This can be used if you want to compare objects, events or concepts underscoring their similarities and differences.

  16. Introduction 1.1 Attention getter 1.2 Thesis statement/ main Point highlighting the concept compared 2. Body 2.1 Object/Event/Concept A 2.1.1 Comparison Point A 2.1.2 Comparison Point B 2.1.3 Comparison Point C 2.2 Object/Event/Concept B 2.2.1 Comparison Point A 2.2.2 Comparison Point B 2.2.3 Comparison Point C 3. Conclusion 3.1 Summary of the Points 3.2 Memorable Statement EXAMPLE Block

  17. Introduction 1.1 Attention getter 1.2 Thesis statement/ main Point highlighting the concept compared 2. Body 2.1 Comparison Point A 2.1.1 Object/Event/Concept A 2.1.2 Object/Event/Concept B 2.1 Comparison Point B 2.1.1 Object/Event/Concept A 2.1.2 Object/Event/Concept B 2.1 Comparison Point C 2.1.1 Object/Event/Concept A 2.1.2 Object/Event/Concept B 3. Conclusion 3.1 Summary of the Points 3.2 Memorable Statement Point-by-point EXAMPLE

  18. Thank You!

  19. REFERENCE:Sipacio, Philippe John F. & Balgos, Ann Richie G. (2016) Oral Communication in Context For Senior High School () C & E Publishing:893 EDSA, South Triangle, Quezon City