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Banishing quiet classrooms: pupils talking teachers listening teachers talking across phases. Tim Nelson and Julie Roberts Gateshead LA. What the workshop intends to do …. Show how to develop pupil voice so that as learners pass through the system, their voice is not lost.

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Banishing quiet classrooms pupils talking teachers listening teachers talking across phases

Banishing quiet classrooms:pupils talking teachers listeningteachers talking across phases

Tim Nelson and Julie Roberts

Gateshead LA


What the workshop intends to do
What the workshop intends to do …

  • Show how to develop pupil voice so that as learners pass through the system, their voice is not lost.

  • They do not become passive.

  • Discuss developing dialogue to give them the skills they need to be

    involved in learning.


The cross phase action research project
The cross-phase action research project

  • Used AfL as the focus but then

    narrowed this down to investigate

    the use of dialogue within the classroom

    and its impact on pupil learning

  • To look at developing a commonality of approaches


The cross phase action research project1
The cross-phase action research project

  • National Strategy funded pilot

  • Started in January 2007

  • Involves one secondary and five of its primary feeder schools

  • Set up 2 networks : Head teachers

    • Teachers

  • Each network met at least twice a term.

  • Builds on work already going on in

    the LA


  • Project outcomes pupils talking teachers listening
    Project outcomes: Pupils talking teachers listening

    • Pupils’ improvement in the quality of discussion, extended answers and pupils ability to build on

      each others answers

    • Improvement in the quality of written work

    • More pupils participating (particularly secondary)

    • Pupils talk in depth with confidence in the primary school

    • Pupils in Year 7 need support to talk in the same depth with a new set of people


    I hope we will discuss our learning when we move to our next school. It would be sad if we didn’t because we share ideas and that helps us to see where we need to improve so we just get better and better.


    Project outcomes teachers talking cross phase
    Project outcomes: next school. It would be sad if we didn’t because we share ideas and that helps us to see where we need to improve so we just get better and better.Teachers talking cross phase

    • Teachers in triads benefited from working closely to share ideas and information

    • They observed how different strategies opened up dialogue in the classroom

    • The project had provided a focussed opportunity to develop links with primary colleagues

    • Good relationships are being established

    • Teacher observations had raised expectations about what pupils were capable of achieving.


    Students’ movement from one school to the next, and the impact on their learning, has been a concern for many years.

    Ruth Sutton


    ‘Cross phase collaboration between teachers and partnerships between schools are difficult concepts to put into action. Primary and secondary education phases are separate rather than a continuum, with a different initial training, teaching methods and support network.’(Martin,2007)


    • Purpose partnerships between schools are difficult concepts to put

    • To contribute to raising attainment in English, Mathematics, Science, ICT and DT by strengthening:

    • Transfer and transition between and within schools and settings particularly focussing on the continuity of learning

    • Use of assessment data to set learning targets for all pupils

    • Pupil ownership and involvement of their own learning

    • Parental involvement at points of transition and transfer

    Developing a commonality of approaches using AfL

    Drive

    Colgate

    Heworth

    Roman

    Road

    Lingey

    House

    }

    White

    Mere

    Dialogue

    SC Feedback Peer and Self Assessment


    The cross phase action research project2
    The cross-phase action research project partnerships between schools are difficult concepts to put

    • Who are involved?

      Primary: 3 year 5,

      1 year 2 1 year 6

      Secondary: English, Maths, Science, ICT & DT

    • How did it work?

      Teachers were sub divided into cross phase

      triads.

      Each half term organised lesson observations

      of all in their triad.


    Individually identify on where your class is and where you want them to go next

    Integrate strategies seen from elsewhere and continue to develop children’s skills

    Compile range of evidence to show how children have developed

    Develop strategies to move the children on

    Visit each others class within triangle

    Visit each others class within triangle

    Visit each others class within triangle

    1st Feb

    Teachers TLC

    13th March

    Teachers TLC

    April /May

    Teachers TLC

    June/July

    Teachers TLC

    Consultant visit

    before 6th March

    Consultant visit

    Consultant visit

    20th March

    Headteachers TLC

    April/May

    Headteachers TLC

    June/July

    Headteachers TLC


    Principles
    Principles want them to go next

    • Networking

    • Collaboration

    • Enquiry

    • External input

    • Leadership

    • Integration and management mechanisms

    • Focus and purpose


    Common and differences

    Triad 1 want them to go next

    *Routines linking peer and self-assessment back to success criteria;

    *talking partners,

    *‘no hands’,

    *looking at learning objectives and creating success criteria.

    Triad 2

    wait time’

    focussed questioning

    the inclusion of all children

    Triad 3

    open questioning.

    Triad 1

    *levels

    *self-esteem issues

    Triad 2

    Feedback

    Triad 3

    ·the use of lolly sticks

    to encourage

    ·talking partners in groups

    · teacher and pupil talk

    ·pupils giving detailed explanations

    ·opportunities for reflection

    ·the use of success criteria

    ·self assessment and explanations

    good independent dialogue used by pupils without the teacher

    Common and differences


    Reviewing the range of strategies used
    Reviewing the range of strategies used want them to go next

    • Insert 32 strategies here.


    Commonality of principles applied
    Commonality want them to go nextof principles applied

    • Vocabulary

    • Developing some common learning routines such as talking partners

    • Developing extended answers and quality dialogue


    Talking partners
    Talking Partners want them to go next

    Some strategies trialled ...

    Randometer

    Ask a friend - millionaire

    Wait time

    No hands up

    Pounce, bounce, bounce


    Outcomes pupil voice and personalised learning
    Outcomes: want them to go nextPupil voice and personalised learning

    • Developed talk in learning through on going conversation at different levels

    • Learner with learner

    • Teacher to learner

    • Learner to teacher

    • Teacher with teacher


    Outcomes pupil voice and personalised learning1
    Outcomes: want them to go nextPupil voice and personalised learning

    • Focused upon anomalies in learning practice and disjointed structure of pupils’ learning journey;

    • Talk between pupils and their teachers helped to personalise learning;

    • Talk between teachers helped to develop commonality of AfL principles and vocabulary;

    • Learners became more confident;

    • Improved the quality of work and learning;

    • Aroused interest and engaged pupils far more in their learning and for longer.


    Headteacher outcomes
    Headteacher outcomes want them to go next

    • Primary school headteachers’ felt that the project was going well and had raised the profile of AfL, although an emerging issue was the difficulty of embedding AfL across a school.

    • One school used a teacher involved in the project by encouraging other staff to observe the successful strategies in practice and to observe their impact on pupils.

    • All agreed that the project was timely.

    • The focus on questioning and dialogue fitted in with other key messages on developing speaking and listening.

    • Project had highlighted for some schools the need to further develop dialogue.


    What is still to come
    What is still to come? want them to go next

    • Expanded to include 8 Primary feeder schools

    • Continue to focus on developing pupil dialogue in the classrooms

    • Teacher observations will continue this term

    • Develop strategies for feedback, peer and self assessment

    • Build the work into structures within schools/ departments

    • Lesser experienced/ ‘harder to move’ staff could perhaps be invited into the project as a method of implementing more effective CPD

    • Including a focus of the impact of the work on ‘vulnerable students’ in the transfer process.

    • Exploring parental involvement


    ‘It now takes a bit more time to get something, whereas in the past it had taken no time to get nothing.’ Gary Secondary


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