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Reading Strategies that work

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  1. Reading Strategies that work Deborah Cruse 2nd Grade Literacy Teacher Fort Dorchester Elementary School

  2. Mission and Vision Mission: Dorchester School District Two leading the way, every student, every day, through relationships, rigor, and relevance. Vision: Dorchester School District Two desires to be recognized as a “World Class” school district, expecting each student to achieve at his/her optimum level in all areas, and providing all members of our district family with an environment that permits them to do their personal best.

  3. Reading Strategies that Work Be a phonogram detective Look at the illustrations Cover up endings Stretch and slide Look for little words inside BIG words Use popcorn words Use context clues Does it rhyme with a word you know?

  4. Contact Information Deborah Cruse 2nd Grade Literacy Teacher, FDES dcruse@dorchester2.k12.sc.us 832-5550 (FDES)

  5. George W. Bush may believe that his administration initiated the idea of No Child Left Behind…

  6. However, the truth is those four words are one of the main reasons we chose to become teachers. We have dedicated ourselves to doing whatever it takes to make sure that no child is left behind socially, emotionally, and above all, academically.

  7. And to that end, we are constantly seeking different ways to make our instruction meaningful, relevant and interesting.

  8. Today, I hope to give you a few more tools to use as you teach your students how to read fluently for comprehension and enjoyment.

  9. I start my reading instruction by telling my students what I believe about readers… A good reader is a good thinker.

  10. The first strategy I introduce is called: Be a Phonogram Detective. Let me explain…

  11. green phonograms pink phonograms Links c dge ea rh er blue phonograms white phonograms yellow phonograms him Readers need to be on the lookout for “phonogram teams,” silent final e’s, words with single vowels, and so on. No matter what reading strategy a child uses, that strategy depends on a basic knowledge of letter sounds. Link

  12. Look at the illustrations. penguins

  13. Look at the illustrations. Link

  14. Popcorn words the from every want been away does

  15. Popcorn words Bang! Popcorn Word Flash Frye’s Phrases

  16. Look for little words inside BIG words. I remind students that when they encounter a “BIG” word in text, not to panic. They need to stop and look carefully at the word to see if there is a “little” word or two that can be read inside the word. These “little” words can be used to decode the entire word.

  17. Look for little words inside BIG words. When we get outside I look for my friends. All we can see is each other's eyes, so it helps to remember what colors they are wearing. Samantha reminds me of a giant pickle in her green parka and Megan, who is dressed all in purple, looks like a jar of grape jelly. (excerpt from Recess at 20 Below)

  18. Cover Up Endings Link A word with a suffix can often be hard to read. To decode such a word, I teach my students to cover up the suffix to discover the base word. After decoding the base word, the student will uncover the ending and read the entire word. ed d t ed ing less ly endings (suffixes) est ful y er ‘s s

  19. Cover Up Endings ed d t ed Definition to share with students: Endings are extra letters you can add to the end of a word to make a new word. Let me show you an activity I use with my students… ing less ly endings (suffixes) est ful y er ‘s s

  20. Use context clues Link Teacher Teaching Script: Pirates tr_____ in a ship. -As you read, you may come to a word that you don’t know. When you get to a word that you cannot read, don’t stop and put on your “reading brakes.” If your mind goes "blank" because you do not know aword, just say “blank," and keep reading. -Read to the end of the sentencewhere you are supposed to stop. (. ? !) -Go back to the word you called “blank”. -The other words in the sentence just might give you clues that will help you figure out how to read the word. -The first letter or letters in the word may also give you a clue that helps you read the word. -Look at all the letters in the word to see if you have figured out the word. -Try the word in the sentence to see if it makes sense. If the word looks right, sounds right and makes sense, then... -Keep reading!! Link

  21. Use context clues Once a reader figures out how to read a new word, he/she may still not know what that word means. Teach the reader to keep reading to the end of the paragraph, or to the end of the page to see if there are any “clues” in the rest of the sentences that may help him/her figure out what the new word means. Sometimes a reader may even have to start a paragraph or a page over again to find “clues” to a word’s definition. clues • judge • courtroom • too much noise • pounds • “Order in the court!” • be quiet

  22. S-t-r-e-t-c-h and slide Teacher script; In spelling, you might be asked to name the sounds in a word, by breaking(pretend to break a stick as you speak) each sound apart (demonstrate segmenting the word “sad”). But when you are trying to read a new word, breakingthe letter sounds apart can sometimes be confusing. Instead of breaking the sounds apart, we are going to try stretchingthe sounds out, like this…(Show the word card “mop.” Put a finger under the letter “m” and say /m/ until you slowly move your finger under the letter “o” and say /o/ until you move your finger to the letter “p” and say /p/.) After stretching out the sounds in a word, you will be able to “hear” the word you are trying to read. So now it’s time to go back and slide the sounds together. (Put your finger under the letter “m” and quickly slide your finger under the whole word as you say “mop.”) This reading plan is called “s-t-r-e-t-c-h and slide, “ (pretend to pull a rubber band apart as you say “s-t-r-e-t-c-h” and then quickly slide your hands close together as you say “slide.”).

  23. S-t-r-e-t-c-h and slide fit best flag cub dark

  24. I made myself a snowball As perfect as could be. I thought I’d keep it as a pet And let it sleep with me. Rhyming words and band land sand stand grand match The rhyming part of a word starts with the first vowel and goes to the end of the word.

  25. Which words rhyme in this poem? Where do you find the rlyming words? Rhyming words When Tillie ate the chili she erupted from her seat, she gulped a quart of water, and fled screaming down the street. If you have to dry the dishes And you drop one on the floor- Maybe they won’t let you Dry the dishes anymore. One two Buckle my shoe

  26. Make a copy of the reading plans for each student to keep in his/her fluency bag. ?

  27. -Use context clues Pirates tr_____ in a ship. -When you come to a word in a sentence that you cannot read, don’t stop and put on your “reading brakes”. Pretend the word is not there and say “blank”. (Sometimes, your mind just goes “blank.”) -Keep reading to the end of the sentence where you see the punctuation mark or stop sign (. ! ?) -Go back to the word you called “blank,” and look carefully at the first letter in the word. -The other words in the sentence, plus the first letter in the word, just might give you enough clues to help you figure out how to read the new word. -Look at all the letters in the new word to see if it looks like the word you are thinking about. -Try the word in the sentence to see if it makes sense. If the new word looks right, sounds right, and makes sense, then… -Keep reading!!

  28. Session EvaluationParticipants are asked to complete a session evaluation for each session attended. Credit (attendance, renewal, and/or technology) will be added following evaluation completion. For each question, use 1=Strongly Disagree, 2=Disagree, 3=Neither Agree nor Disagree, 4=Agree, 5=Strongly Agree. Your responses will assist us in planning future professional development in Dorchester School District Two. • The instructor was well prepared for the workshop. • The materials for the workshop were appropriate. • The concepts presented were appropriate to my job. • I will benefit from attending this session. • I would recommend this training to others.