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INMATE SUPERVISION. NCCRC 2007. THIS CLASS SHOULD BE NAMED WITH THREE DIFFERENT TITLES…. OFFENDER SUPERVISION. INMATE MANIPULATION. INMATE “CON GAMES”. Code Of Professional & Personal Conduct And Ethical Responsibility.

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INMATE SUPERVISION


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offender supervision
OFFENDER SUPERVISION

INMATE MANIPULATION

INMATE “CON GAMES”

code of professional personal conduct and ethical responsibility
Code Of Professional & Personal Conduct And Ethical Responsibility
  • I will not discuss employee relations with incarcerated inmates nor with anyone outside the employment of this institution.
  • I will honor confidentiality of all communications to me in the course of my employment or by other employees, inmates or others concerning personal, private, and business matters.
  • I will not discuss personal, family, or other private matters concerning myself or other employees with inmates.
conduct ethics cont
Conduct & Ethics Cont…

4. I will not discriminate unfairly by dispensing of special favors to anyone for any reason and never accept for myself, my family, or others any favors or benefits from any inmates or others which could possibly reflect an influence upon my conduct of duty and responsibility.

5. I will avoid unnecessary social conduct with inmates whether inside or outside of the institution.

6. I will never discuss other employees with inmates, including their work, personal lives and habits, or associations with others.

conduct ethics cont1
Conduct & Ethics Cont…

7. I will support fellow employees at all times.

8. I will not engage in horseplay or fraternization with inmates, nor will I allow my name to be used as in support or opposition of inmate proposals concerning the operation of NCCRC, NDSP, JRCC, MRCC, or RRI.

9. I will not complain about my employment either in public, with co-workers or to the press without first addressing my concerns with the Director or their designee.

conduct ethics cont2
Conduct & Ethics Cont…

10. I will always treat other staff with respect, kindness, and tolerance. I will be professional, maintain self-control and discipline, and exercise patience and discretion in my dealings with others.

  • I will not abuse my sick leave privileges and will not report to work while under the influence of alcohol or other drug, nor will I consume or use alcohol or other drugs to such and extent that it will preclude me from reporting to duty when assigned.
  • I will report to the Administrator any significant changes in my personal affairs. Example: Arrests, court appearances, and other affairs which might in some way affect my employment status.
  • I will not wear my uniform in public when I am not on duty, and I will be courteous to the public at all times.
slide8
Jails are totalitarian communities; places where people are held against their will and forced to live with their controllers. Freedom of speech, choice and movement are restricted. They are communities where one is told when to arise, when to retire, what to eat, what to wear and what is acceptable behavior.
slide9
In society, if a person doesn't like the way he is treated, he can quit, walk away. If an organization doesn't like the way a person behaves, they can fire them. In both situations, a conflict is avoided, but in a correctional setting these options are not available. We must learn to manage all persons under our care in a professional manner to avoid conflicts which make our jobs easier, provide a better environment for the staff and inmate and will better serve our community.
performance objectives
Performance Objectives:
  • After listening to the lecture and viewing the film, each participant will be able to:
      • 1.Identify legal considerations of inmate supervision.
      • 2.Identify ways the human mind can be manipulated.
      • 3.Identify traits associated with people who are targets for manipulation.
performance objectives1
Performance Objectives:
  • 4.Identify the five steps of a "setup" of staff.
  • 5.Identify five of the eight tools used to setup staff members.
  • 6.Identify eight of the twelve protectors staff can use to avoid setups.
definition supervision
Definition: Supervision
  • A. Supervision is a relationship in which one person controls the activities of one or more persons or things.
    • The correctional officer's task is primarily to supervise people. This is most often accomplished through written and/or verbal communication. Communication is a training topic in itself. The importance of effective communication cannot be over-emphasized. Effective supervision will break down without it.
supervision of inmates by correctional officers
Supervision of inmates by Correctional Officers
  • B. Supervision by correctional officers should influence inmates to achieve specific goals and/or to function within defined guidelines.
    • 1. The defined guidelines shall be in writing if consistency is to be maintained.
      • Specific goals must be available to the correctional officers as well as to the inmates.
    • 2.KEEP YOUR WORD
      • Your word is your bond! If you say something, back it up! If you can't back it up, don't say it! If you want to lose respect--if you want to cause more problems--just tell an inmate you will do something and then fail to do it!
supervision
Supervision
  • 3.Through ineffective supervision, some or many inmates are placed on report which may result in disciplinary action; when, in reality, the infraction was administration or correctional officer caused.
    • An officer may cause an inmate to be insolent through lack of empathy or failure to communicate, thus causing anger.
  • 4.Our job is to manage and report behavior.
    • Reports can be a management tool, but should not be the only resource in the tool box. “If your only tool is a hammer, then everything will look like a nail".
legal considerations
LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • North Dakota State Statutes and Jail Rules require that inmates be held under the supervision of a correctional officer 24 hours a day.
  • The North Dakota Century Code requires that "a correctional officer be available at all times to respond to the reasonable NEEDS of an inmate."
legal considerations1
LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The North Dakota Jail Rules require that "each inmate must be personally observed by a correctional officer at least every 60 minutes on an irregular basis”.
  • The North Dakota Jail Rules require that inmates who exhibit suicidal tendencies, who manifest emotional distress, or who have specialized medical problems such as severe intoxication, shall be observed by a correctional officer at more frequent intervals (than in C above) as their condition requires.
legal considerations2
LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Federal and state courts have consistently held that correctional officers have a duty to protect inmates.
    • A breach of that duty which results in injury to the inmate can/will lead to successful litigation against the governing authority, the facility administrator, and/or the officer(s) involved.
legal considerations3
LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • F. The correctional officer must maintain general order and security.
    • This is accomplished by being aware of all inmate activities and movements.
  • Supervision is the key to maintaining order and security. You are the key.
  • Locks do not provide security, only you do!
conflict between kept and keeper
CONFLICT BETWEEN KEPT AND KEEPER:
  • A. When an offender enters the prison community they are preconditioned to animosity, hatred and contempt for authority. They soon learn that by acting out, refusing to cooperate, or disobeying rules and being willing to do these things regardless of the punishment, gives them status among their peers.
conflict between kept and keeper1
CONFLICT BETWEEN KEPT AND KEEPER:
  • This is an inmate's way of adapting his free-world survival tactics to his new jail environment.
employee inmate behavior
EMPLOYEE/INMATE BEHAVIOR:
  • Administrators strive to hire personnel of strong moral character; people that inmates can emulate and learn acceptable habits from; people they can learn to respect and through whom they can find value in their own lives.
employee inmate behavior1
EMPLOYEE/INMATE BEHAVIOR
  • B. Employees are directed to be friendly, but not overly familiar; and not to give anything to or accept anything from inmates or the inmate’s friends or family.
  • C. Inmates are provided with copies of rules and regulations and in most cases are more familiar with them than employees
employee inmate behavior2
EMPLOYEE/INMATE BEHAVIOR
  • D. When an inmate breaks a rule, he expects the employee to follow the proper procedures for disciplinary action.
    • By following the proper procedure, the employee shows the inmate that unacceptable behavior will not be tolerated. Inmates usually have no respect for staff members they can lower to their own level of behavior.
employee inmate behavior3
EMPLOYEE/INMATE BEHAVIOR
  • E. If the employee fails to follow the rules, he has lost effective control
    • the inmate is calling the shots, not the employee.
  • The inmate will now try to take advantage of the situation to gain contraband or status among his peers.
the manipulation process
THE MANIPULATION PROCESS:
  • A. The human mind can be manipulated in a variety of ways; fatigue, threat, isolation, hunger, sleep deprivation and fear.
  • B. One reason that people are vulnerable to manipulation is the fact that they readily accept information without question when it appears to be consistent with their hopes or beliefs.
the manipulation process1
THE MANIPULATION PROCESS:
  • C. Some of the traits associated with people who are targets for manipulation are:
      • 1.Naiveté - "Having or displaying a simple or trusting nature; lacking in experience, lacking in careful judgment or analysis and being unsophisticated.
      • 2.Excessive friendliness and over-familiarization - such as discussing personal problems or financial matters.
the manipulation process2
THE MANIPULATION PROCESS:
  • Correctional Staff should develop an attitude of helpfulness while maintaining the necessary professional barrier.
techniques of the set up
TECHNIQUES OF THE SET-UP
  • A. The Observation Process:
    • 1.Body Language Observation - the manner and method in which correctional officers carry themselves gives off messages.
      • a. Body Movements - Posture and walking can indicate an employee's demeanor.
      • b. Nervousness/Ease- Nervous actions such as biting lip or fingernails, excessive scratching or shifting from foot to foot.
      • c. Manner of Dress - Partial uniform, unpressed clothing or buttons left open indicate sloppiness. Inmates assume this person will allow the taking of liberties.
techniques of the set up1
TECHNIQUES OF THE SET-UP
  • 2. Listening Observation:
      • Whether prison staff members like it or not, their conversations are constantly monitored.
        • a. Information gathering locations:
          • Officer's dining areas - casual conversation while eating
          • Phone conversations - How you respond to superiors, peers and inmates while using the phone
          • Hallways - who is listening or watching you?
techniques of the set up2
TECHNIQUES OF THE SET-UP
  • b. Kinds of desired information:
      • Likes and dislikes - conversation is styled around topics employee shows interest in.
      • Personal date - home address, phone number, spouse's job, number of cars, etc., help formulate a lifestyle picture.
      • Personal history - employees' experience and educational background.
techniques of the set up3
TECHNIQUES OF THE SET-UP
  • 3. Verbal Observation - Preliminary testing begins.
      • a.Inmate engages the employee in conversations
        • Confirm theories and predictions from listening observation.
        • Gathers more information.
      • b.Inmate suggests minor rule violation
        • (1) Looks for signs of approval or disapproval - does this type of conversation make employee feel uncomfortable or can inmate feed the employee's ego?
        • (2) Employee's response indicates his control/lack of control. Needs to be aware of the message the inmate is really getting
techniques of the set up4
TECHNIQUES OF THE SET-UP
  • 4. Action Observation
      • a. Inmate actually violates a rule to determine if theory on employee's reaction is correct.
      • b. Forms of action observation that deliver messages to inmates are:
        • (1) Methods of command
        • (2) Responses to emergencies
        • (3) Levels of tolerance
        • (4) Satisfaction with the job
      • c. Situations can/will be created to see how a potential victim acts under certain conditions.
selection of a victim
Selection of a victim:
  • 1. Intentional Selection
    • The following characteristics could indicate weakness.
      • a. Excessive friendliness and over-familiarity.
      • b.A naive and trusting nature.
      • c.Lack of experience - lack of understanding of the prison environment and the inmate’s mindset.
selection of a victim1
Selection of a victim:
  • 2. Accidental Selection
    • a. Hidden weakness - any trait possessed by an employee that inmate's construe as a weakness.
    • b. Change of job assignment or family status can affect employee.
selection of a victim2
Selection of a victim:
  • 3. Inmate manipulators place correctional Staff into 3 categories:
    • a. The SOFT type:
      • (1) Usually very trusting
      • (2) Overly familiar and naive
      • (3) Understanding, Sympathetic
      • (4) Strong desire to help those in need
      • (5) The inability to say NO or take command of a situation could produce a person susceptible to manipulation.
selection of a victim3
Selection of a victim:
  • b. The “HARD” type:
    • (1) Goes strictly by the book
    • (2) Grants inmates no leeway
    • (3) Inmates may perceive that the hardness may hide a weakness in the individual.
selection of a victim4
Selection of a victim:
  • c. The “MELLOW” type (Professional)
    • (1) Knows when to be soft/hard
    • (2) Knows how to use these traits at appropriate times
    • (3) The mellow officer is usually left alone, because the manipulation process would take too long.
tools of a set up
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • A. The Support System
    • Series of praises designed to befriend and develop a sense of togetherness and understanding.
      • 1. Nonverbal - Inmate attempts to make himself indispensable.
      • a. Prompt in reporting to work
      • b. Enthusiastic about his assignment
      • c. Performing well
      • d. Making employee job easier
tools of a set up1
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • 2. Verbal - Ego uplifting to strengthen friendship.
    • a. Compliments on clothing or appearance
    • b. Offers of help
    • c. Promises of loyalty
    • d. Agreeing with employees ideas and philosophies
    • e. Pledges of faith and devotion
tools of a set up2
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • B. Empathy and/or Sympathy
    • 1.Empathy - based on a shared understanding, experience or vicarious experience of feelings, thoughts or attitudes.
      • a. A sameness of feeling
      • b. Sharing common experiences (i.e. religion, marriage, divorce, etc.)
      • c. Two people who think alike form a mutual respect because they see the good qualities in each other.
tools of a set up3
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • 2.Sympathy - Demonstrate a feeling without necessarily having had the experience that induced the emotion.
    • a.Pity or compassion for another's troubles
    • b.Attempt to establish a you/me situation in order to evoke sympathy
    • C.The plea for help - Employees help inmates by using appropriate methods or channels.
tools of a set up4
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • C. Rehabilitation/Change of life style:
    • 1. I need your help"
      • b. "I'm a failure/I lack confidence"
      • c. "You're the only one who can help me"
    • 2. Confidentiality:
      • a. Inmate requests confidentiality
tools of a set up5
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • D. The We/They Syndrome - An attempt to separate the victim (the Staff Member) from the rest of their co-workers.
      • Also called: "Divide and Conquer". Staff with low self esteem, not liked or respected by other staff and/or have little or no support outside of the job are prime targets for manipulation. Staff with marital/relationship problems are at a particular high risk to be targeted.
tools of a set up6
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • E. The Offer of Protection
    • 1. Minor Offers:
      • a. Friendliness - "I'll get this done for you"
      • b. Trust – “I'll take the heat"
    • 2. Serious Offers
      • a. Attempt to instill a feeling of fear in employee
      • b. Stage an event that indicates a need for inmate protection
      • c. Create a grateful victim
tools of a set up7
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • F. Allusions to Sex
    • 1. If the victim is female
      • a. Creating an false image of themselves
        • (1) "Out there, I'm a nice guy"
        • (2) Allusions to sex are directed toward employee, but away from manipulator
      • b. Employee responses
        • (1) If employee offers no comment – the inmate assumes freedom to make further comments
        • (2) If response is "I've had enough“- the inmate may act as if feelings are hurt, but will most likely not try this again
tools of a set up8
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • 2. If the victim is male
    • a. Communicate on nonprofessional level to form common bond
      • (1) Dirty joke
      • (2) Pornographic story
      • (3) "Girly" magazine
    • b. Desired results
      • (1) Employee relates personal information
      • (2) Manipulation lever obtained
tools of a set up9
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • G. The Touch System
    • 1. Male
      • a. Hand shaking
      • b. Pat on the back
      • c. Hand on the shoulder
tools of a set up10
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • 2. Female
    • a. Flicking of dirt speck from woman's clothing
    • b. Straightening of blouse collar
    • c. Touching of shoulders
    • d. Touching becomes more frequent and prolonged
    • e. The "Accidental Touch" happens
tools of a set up11
TOOLS OF A SET-UP
  • H. The Rumor Clinic
          • Rumors produce a "Gut Level Feeling" of validity.
    • 1.The isolation process - Staff is pulled away from the victim.
      • a. Rumor is begun in area away from victim's work area
      • b. Rumor gains force
      • c. Peer attitudes begin changing
      • d. Peer contacts with individual become less and less frequent
      • e. Inmates become "only friends"
turnouts
TURNOUTS
  • A. The Shopping List:
    • 1. Request for contraband or favor:
      • a. Drugs, tobacco, alcohol, money, weapons, sex
      • b. Solicited on a "one-time only" basis
      • c. Request becomes a demand if the victim refuses.
turnouts1
TURNOUTS
  • 2. Employee Reaction:
    • a. Shock or disbelief
    • b. Decision must be made at this time whether to succumb to the demands or do the right thing
  • 3. Inmate Exposure:
    • a. Risks disciplinary action for making the request/maybe more jail time
    • b. Never considers backing out
turnouts2
TURNOUTS
  • B. The Lever:
    • 1. Creation of the lever:
      • a. Can be obtained anytime during the first eleven steps of the set-up.
      • b. Employee may be unaware a lever has been obtained.
turnouts3
TURNOUTS
  • 2. Lever is applied:
    • a. Victim is reminded of an earlier indiscretion and exposure may be threatened
    • b. Compliance means freedom - pressure is lifted - for now
    • c. "If caught, I'm in trouble, refuse and so are you"
turnouts4
TURNOUTS
  • 3.Employee Reaction:
    • a. Must make acceptance/refusal decision
    • b. Undergoes a definite personality change
        • Either can’t trust anyone again, scared of own shadow, becomes hard lined about everything and everyone, etc.
turnouts5
TURNOUTS
  • C. The Sting
    • 1.Force is threatened:
      • a. "Do as you're told and you won't be harmed“
      • b. Force is usually used as a last resort
turnouts6
TURNOUTS
  • 2. Outcomes:
    • a. If employee submits:
      • (1) Inmates have won battle of the minds
      • (2) They possess the will of the victim
      • (3) May be forced to resign in disgrace
      • (4) Faces possible termination or prosecution when discovered
      • (5) Injury or death
protector steps
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Employees set the stage.
    • 1.The employee approaches the inmate on the inmates level.
      • a.Some employees approach the inmate on the inmates level.
        • (1) They Use profanity around and with inmates
        • (2) Use prison jargon (inmate slang)
      • b.Relegating to the inmates level.
        • (1) Staff think What you're doing and saying must be ok because they are doing/saying it also.
      • c.Inmates need and even desire good examples.
protector steps1
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #1
    • Always Be Professional
  • Protector #2
    • Learn to recognize the steps to a set-up.
      • Nip it in the bud!
protector steps2
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #3
    • 1. Understand that all communication consists of a sender and a receiver.
      • a. Messages sent and received by inmates are different than "free world" messages
      • b. Monitor your and the inmates seeming casual remarks
      • c. Ask yourself "What would I do if“????
protector steps3
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #4
    • 1. Learn to say NO and mean it.
      • a. Be firm
      • b. No room for negotiation
      • c. No hesitating
      • d. Not in a vindictive or punitive manner
protector steps4
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #5
    • 1.Be in command of your area
      • a.Inmates are always willing to "fill in" new employees
        • (1) Leads to over-familiarization
        • (2) Remember to seek advice from staff only
      • b.Staff’s Uniform Appearance
        • (1) Can be a valuable tool in control and deterrent of trouble
        • (2) It cannot command or control; only the person wearing it can do that
      • c.Be firm but fair and consistent.
protector steps5
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #6
    • 1. Be knowledgeable of institutional rules and policies not covered in the officer rules or the inmate handbook.
      • a. Inmates usually know if you can grant a favor or not
      • b. Ask yourself: Is the requested help part of my job or a "friend to friend" type of request?
protector steps6
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #7
    • 1. Keep everything in the open
      • a. This is a key element in stopping the set-up
      • b. Tell someone. Make sure to advise the COS and/or Administrator
      • c. If you notice someone else being manipulated, tell them and them report it to your Supervisor
      • d. Manipulators do not want "Openness" because another staff member may expose the "set-up".
protector steps7
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #8
    • 1. Do not get into a you/me situation
      • a. A secret gives one or the other a chance to take liberties if the secret is to be kept a secret
      • b. The inmate will take the liberties
      • c. New employees are easily subjected
      • d. Do not say to or do anything to the inmate you would not do if the warden were standing beside you.
protector steps8
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #9
    • 1. Victims should let someone know they feel they are being cultivated and let the inmate involved know that you have told someone.
      • a. Silence or inaction could mean approval on your part, whether involved or not
      • b. If manipulators can get by with it, why should they stop?
      • c. This action will let them know where you stand.
protector steps9
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #10
    • 1. Put it in writing
      • a. If it isn't recorded, it isn't so.
      • b. When do you record it?
        • (1) As soon as possible
        • (2) To procrastinate is to either approve or try to cover it up.
protector steps10
PROTECTOR STEPS:
  • Protector #11
    • 1. Know what to do in a crisis situation
      • a. Presentation of shopping list
        • (1) Buy some time
        • (2) Remain noncommittal until out of danger
        • (3) Report to supervisor immediately
      • b. Other situations
        • (1) Riot
        • (2) Fire
        • (3) Fight
professionalism and being a professional
PROFESSIONALISM AND BEING A PROFESSIONAL
  • A. What is professionalism:
    • 1. Communicating and acting in a manner that distinguishes a person of skill and knowledge from an amateur.
    • 2. Emanates from a learned effort
    • 3. Specialized terminology
    • 4. Requires a special body of knowledge and skill as a basis for uniform performance.
    • 5. Practices are based on a specialized training and conscious research and study
professionalism and being a professional1
PROFESSIONALISM AND BEING A PROFESSIONAL
  • 6. Require a high degree of personal responsibility.
  • 7. Requires a high degree of allegiance to its many facets, code of ethics and public interest.
professionalism and being a professional2
PROFESSIONALISM AND BEING A PROFESSIONAL
  • B. Being professional will help stop some of these games because….
      • Professionals:
    • 1. Believe in themselves and exude self-confidence without the slightest hint of brusqueness or conceit.
    • 2. Are reliable and emotionally stable; able to accept responsibility and take independent action.
    • 3. Control their situation instead of their situation controlling them.
professionalism and being a professional3
PROFESSIONALISM AND BEING A PROFESSIONAL
    • Professionals:
  • 4. Are firm but fair which means adherence to the rules in a patient, constructive, creative manner.
  • 5. Are not anxious to impress or cherish inflated ideas of their own importance.
  • 6. Display good manners and speech.
  • 7. Are unselfish and not touchy.
professionalism and being a professional4
PROFESSIONALISM AND BEING A PROFESSIONAL
    • Professionals:
  • 8. Search for the truth instead of spreading rumors or gossip.
  • 9. Do not keep account of evil or gloat over the wickedness of others.
  • 10. Are neat in appearance and develop a friendly personality without becoming over-familiar.
  • 11. Analyze their own speech and actions as well as the speech and actions of others.
professionalism and being a professional5
PROFESSIONALISM AND BEING A PROFESSIONAL
    • Professionals:
  • 12. Are humble, sympathetic and understanding without divulging their own personal affairs or problems or without allowing themselves to be distracted or given to favoritism.
  • 13. Adapt to change, maintain enthusiasm, dispel prejudice and show allegiance to their employers.
  • 14. Are alert, quick to response, able to make decisions accurately and fairly, and concern with the welfare of both staff and inmates.
professional interaction with inmates
PROFESSIONAL INTERACTION WITHINMATES
  • Three steps to facilitate a professional working relationship with inmates.
      • 1. Be firm, fair and consistent
      • 2. Be assertive (Authoritative).
professional interaction with inmates1
PROFESSIONAL INTERACTION WITHINMATES
  • When relating to an inmate on a professional level, your attitude should always be:
      • 1. Neutral
      • 2. Objective
professional interaction with inmates2
PROFESSIONAL INTERACTION WITHINMATES
  • When addressing inmates:
      • 1. Use their last names whenever possible (Inmate Jones)
      • 2. Never use nicknames or ethnic terms
      • 3. Do not use profanity
        • a. It is Not professional
        • b. It Puts you on their level
        • c. Inmates will use it against you if they can
        • d. Inmates will not respect you as much
professional interaction with inmates3
PROFESSIONAL INTERACTION WITHINMATES
  • Work Detail Supervision:
      • 1. Give orders in a normal tone of voice
        • a. Never yell or shout
        • b. Never curse
      • 2. Be authoritative, expect to be obeyed
      • 3. Be sure to give clear instructions
professional interaction with inmates4
PROFESSIONAL INTERACTION WITHINMATES
  • 4. Never countermand an order given by another officer
  • 5. Never argue with an inmate
    • Just send them back to their cell
  • 6. ALWAYS
    • a.Be Fair
    • B. Be Firm
    • b. Be Consistent
    • c. Be Impartial
    • d. Never play favorites