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The Scottish Play Day One! . As you come in, take a card. 1s head to the desks closest to the computer lab 2s head to the desks closest to the wall with slanted windows 3s head to the desks in the center

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the scottish play day one
The Scottish Play Day One!

As you come in, take a card.

1s head to the desks closest to the computer lab

2s head to the desks closest to the wall with slanted windows

3s head to the desks in the center

Writing Prompt:Do you love Shakespeare? Why or why not? Do you hate Shakespeare? Why or why not? Are you freaked out or scared of Shakespeare? Why or why not?

today s activities
Today’s activities
  • Writing Prompt
  • Slang Exercise
  • Intro to Shakespeare
  • Book Check Out

Writing Prompt:Do you love Shakespeare? Why or why not? Do you hate Shakespeare? Why or why not? Are you freaked out or scared of Shakespeare? Why or why not?

today s objective goal what i want you to learn
Today’s objective/goal/what I want YOU to learn
  • Neither Shakespeare nor Mrs. deVidal are trying to mess with you in reading “The Scottish Play”
  • Consider some reasons why language in a text can be challenging
  • What is iambic pentameter and why should we care?
what did you say
What did you say?
  • With a partner, please translate the following into modern American English

Once yonks ago, I had a walkabout and met a banana bender. He was a few kangaroos loose in the top paddock. His car was a cactus chock a block with junk, and it went kaput. He was quite a lerrikin who would lag a lot, so he became a yobbo who had to do yakka. He told me a yarn about when he was a great aerial ping pong player. He was off his face and all he had to eat was a dead horse, so I gave him a chook and a used thong I had. Never seen him since, hope he has no worries, mate!

and it says
and it says…

Once, a long time ago, I went for a walk and met someone from Queensland. He was not all there mentally. His car was a piece of junk and it had broken down. He was a rascal and irresponsible young man. He didn’t want to do much so he had to work as a manual laborer. He told me a story about how he was a great Australian Rules soccer player.

He was extremely drunk and had nothing to eat, so I gave him a chicken and some used sandals. I haven’t seen him since then; I hope he’s fine, friend.

what did you think
What did you think?
  • Which words were particularly difficult?
  • Which words were familiar? Where did you learn them?
  • Which words still don’t make sense?

Now, try to confuse me. With your partner, write 3-4 sentences using slang I won’t understand.

shakespeare doesn t hate you
Shakespeare doesn’t hate you
  • Remember, many of Shakespeare’s references and slang would have been perfectly normal for his time
  • Shakespeare wrote plays; much of his audience would have followed the story based on the action, the emotions of the characters and the tone the actors. Even his audiences didn’t understand all of it.
shakespeare s life
Shakespeare’s Life
  • We don’t know much.
  • Many of the plays come from other stories that would have been familiar to his audiences.
  • Variations of plays come from different works found. Characters and lines can be different.
iambic pentameter
Iambic Pentameter
  • What was it and why does it matter
    • Remember Romeo and Juliet?
    • Say the line with me
    • “But soft, what light through yonder window breaks” Romeo and Juliet 2.2.2
    • 10 Students up on their feet
try these lines from macbeth
Try these lines from Macbeth

So foul and fair a day I have not seen (1.2.1)

Can you find the rhythm and accents?

What is Macbeth saying here?-(These are his first lines in the play)

try these lines from macbeth1
Try these lines from Macbeth

Is this a dagger which I see before me, /

The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee (1.2.131-2)

What is Macbeth trying to say here?-(Hint-he’s thinking about murder)

iambic pentameter1
Iambic Pentameter

Iambic

Pentameter

What do you think it means?

Why does it matter?....

try these lines from macbeth2
Try these lines from Macbeth

Is this a dagger which I see before me, /

The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee (1.2.131-2)

Where is it regular Iambic pentameter

Where is does the rhythm change/break

What might the character be feeling when the rhythm is regular

What might the character be feeling when the rhythm is messed up?

characters
Characters

Turn to Page 3 in your textbooks

  • Character Page.
  • Good reference for you to go back to as names are sometimes difficult to track
text features
Text Features

Turn to page 6

1.1 sentence/paragraph

  • At the beginning of each scene
  • Give a summary of the action
  • Provides some context
text features1
Text Features

Turn to page 6

Footnotes to side

  • Give definitions of difficult or unfamiliar words and terms
text features2
Text Features

Turn to page 7

Line numbers

  • Generally every 5th line is marked
  • For citations, Act I scene I, lines 3-4 becomes 1.1.3-4 (like Odyssey)
text features3
Text Features

Turn to page 23

  • Note the “aside” on line 125
  • Direction to whom the character is speaking. Sometime to the audience, sometimes to a particular character
  • Assume that only the intended listener can hear
characters1
Characters

Major Players: Macbeth

  • Main character
  • General of the Scottish army
  • Ambitious
  • Shakespeare Language. Macbeth speaks in blank verse
  • Poetry of his speech shows humanity,
characters2
Characters

Major Players: Macbeth

  • Divided between his moral side and his corrupt, ambitious side
  • Reflective, intelligent, even sensitive in a way
characters3
Characters

Major Players: Lady Macbeth

  • Ambitious, savage woman
  • attempts Goads her husband into killing his king
  • Suffers terrible guilt for murders
  • Mrs. deVidal’s favorite literary villain
characters4
Characters

Major Players: Lady Macbeth

  • Shakespeare language: Lady M speaks in prose regular language (less poetic than Macbeth)
  • Her use of language fits her practical character
  • Contrast w/Macbeth’s poetic language
characters5
Characters:

Major Players: The three witches

  • They set up the atmosphere in the beginning of the play “fair is foul and foul is fair”
  • Function is to give predictions of the future, sometimes encouragement, sometimes warning
  • These predictions cause a chain reaction in Macbeth
  • Macbeth hears what he wants to hear