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Climate Safeguards Systems Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Bank Operations. Al-Hamndou Dorsouma Climate Change Expert Compliance and Safeguards Division (ORQR.3). SESA Workshop 21-22 March, 2011. Background. Context.

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climate safeguards systems mainstreaming climate change adaptation into bank operations

Climate Safeguards SystemsMainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Bank Operations

Al-Hamndou Dorsouma

Climate Change Expert

Compliance and Safeguards Division (ORQR.3)

SESA Workshop

21-22 March, 2011

context
Context
  • The project is part of the implementation of the Bank Climate Risk Management and Adaptation (CRMA) strategy approved in June 2009
  • The CRMA aims at reducing climate vulnerability and promoting climate-resilient development in Africa
  • The CRMA underscores the need for AfDB to mainstream climatic risks into its project cycle.
project objectives
Project objectives
  • Developing guidelines & tools (Climate Safeguards System) for mainstreaming CC into Bank project cycle.
expected results
Expected results
  • The project is being implemented in 3 phases:
    • Screening manual
    • Screening Tool
    • Knowledge Base
  • Training sessions for Task Managers and Climate Change and Environment Specialists for tools' application are being planned
links to iss and sesa
Links to ISS and SESA
  • The Climate Safeguards System (CSS) complements the Bank’s Environmental and Social Assessment Procedures (ESAP)
  • It provides project teams with additional assessments of projects’ climate vulnerabilities and risks
  • It provides guidance at strategic and project levels:
    • Project level: assessment, at project early stage, of climate risks and adaptation measures
    • Strategic level: country’s climate vulnerability profile and adaptation needs, in the framework of Country Strategic Paper (CSP)
method
Method
  • A scorecards method is being used based on sector and project characteristics
  • Different scorecards are included in the Screening Manual and Tool
  • Completed scorecard provides project teams with levels of risk and required mitigation measures.
process
Process

The screening process follows 6 steps:

  • Task Managers are requested to:
    • Select scorecards according to sector and project characteristics;
    • Enter basic information on project, once scorecard is selected;
    • Answer questions: possible answers are presented as a number of options, each one with a predetermined score;
    • Add up scores and categorize: selected option scores are added up to obtain a total score for the project;
    • Based on the total score, the project is classified based on its climate vulnerability;
    • Completed scorecard and screening summary are enclosed to the Project Concept Note and sent to ORQR for inspection, approval, and follow up.
project classification
Project classification
  • The process will result into 3 types of projects:
transport sector
Transport Sector
  • SCORECARD: Transport – Roads
  • PROJECT: Ethiopia Bedele–Metu & Kombolcha–Bati–Mille Roads Upgrading Project.
  • The project is classified as CATEGORY 2 for climate adaptation.
  • Based on the screening exercise, a review of climate change risk and adaptation options is required, with a focus on the topics that scored highest, namely: Damage to road infrastructure.
agriculture sector 1
Agriculture sector (1)
  • Scorecard: Agriculture – Cropping & Irrigation
  • Project: Ethiopia Koga irrigation and watershed management project. The project is classified as CATEGORY 1
  • The evaluation should focus on : Soil erosion; impact of severe weather conditions on project activities and physical infrastructure.
agriculture sector 2
Agriculture sector (2)
  • SCORECARD: Agriculture – Livestock
  • PROJECT: Tuléar Fishing Communities Support Project in Madagascar. It is classified as CATEGORY 2.
  • The review should focus on physical infrastructure.
water sector
Water sector
  • Scorecard: ‘Water’
  • Project : Small Towns and Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Project in Kenya. The project is classified as CATEGORY 1
  • The evaluation should focus on the topics that scored highest, namely: Asset lifetime; water resources; and resources variability
energy sector 1
Energy sector (1)
  • SCORECARD: Energy – excluding hydroelectric generation
  • Project: Burkina Faso Rural Electrification project. It is classified as CATEGORY 2.
  • The review of climate change risk and adaptation options should focus mainly on the topics that scored highest, namely: Risk of flooding
energy sector 2
Energy sector (2)
  • SCORECARD: Energy – Hydroelectric generation
  • Project: Sahanivotry Hydroelectric Power Station Project
  • The project is classified as CATEGORY 1 for climate adaptation.
  • The evaluation should focus on water availability in the catchment area; and asset life time
country adaptation factsheets
Country Adaptation Factsheets
  • A Country Adaptation Fact Sheet (CAFS) is a short (3-4 pages) document giving an overview of climate risks, climate variability and change, and adaptation information at the country scale.
  • The CAFS provides information on: current climate risks; recent trends; future scenarios; and adaptation needs
  • It provides a point of entry for country teams to familiarise themselves with the key climate related issues facing the country, thereby enabling the team to put the relevant issues on the agenda when developing or updating the Country Strategy Paper (CSP).
case study tanzania
Case Study:Tanzania
  • Current climate: Basic indicators of climate-related risks
case study tanzania cont d
Case Study:Tanzania (cont’d)
  • Current climate: Tanzania has a tropical climate with regional variations due to topography.
  • Temperatures range from 17-25°C (e.g. Dar es Salaam). Highland regions are more temperate (e.g. Mbeya, 20‐23°C).
case study tanzania cont d22
Case Study:Tanzania (cont’d)
  • Current climate: The amount of rainfall across Tanzania varies greatly between regions, and can be as much as 300 mm per month in the wettest regions and seasons.
case study tanzania cont d23
Case Study:Tanzania (cont’d)
  • Recent climate trends: the mean annual temperature has increased by approximately 1.0°C since 1960.
  • Increasing trends in the frequency of hot days, but much larger increasing trends in the frequency of hot nights, especially from December to February
  • Significant decreasing trends in annual rainfall, notably in the ‘long’ rains (March to May): annual rainfall has decreased at an average rate of 2.8mm per month per decade (3.3%)
  • The greatest annual decreases have occurred in the southern most parts of Tanzania.
  • It’s currently difficult to say anything conclusive about changes in extreme rainfall events.
case study tanzania cont d24
Case study: Tanzania (cont’d)
  • Future scenarios: GCMs projections show increase of mean annual temperature by 1.0 to 2.7°C by the 2060s, and 1.5 to 4.5°C by the 2090s
  • Changes in sea levels rise, especially for Zanzibar and Bagamayo,
  • GCM projections indicate increases in annual rainfall. Scenarios and abnormalities are shown below
case study tanzania cont d25
Case study: Tanzania (cont’d)
  • Adaptation planning: The number of climate adaptation projects taking place in Tanzania is rapidly increasing, particularly in water, agriculture sectors.
  • However coordination of these efforts remains limited.
  • The NAPA process in Tanzania (completed in 2007) identified some early adaptation priorities, such as:
    • Increasing food security;
    • Increasing water security;
    • Coastal groundwater management;
    • Reforestation on mountain slopes;
    • Livelihood diversification.
case study tanzania cont d26
Case study: Tanzania (cont’d)
  • Adaptation planning: Overview of international funded climate projects in Tanzania
case study tanzania cont d27
Case study: Tanzania (cont’d)
  • Adaptation planning: Overview of current key actors working on climate change and adaptation
case study tanzania cont d28
Case study: Tanzania (cont’d)
  • Adaptation planning: Additional documentation that may be needed to inform the adaptation planning process, include:
    • Climate change assessment
    • Stakeholder network map:
    • Sectoral vulnerability assessments
    • Disaster risk assessment
    • Economic analysis of adaptation options
    • Adaptation project inventory
conclusion
Conclusion
  • The outcome of CSS will have implications for Bank’s ESAP, as climate change needs to be looked at two different angles:
    • Assessment of impacts of projects on climate change
    • Assessment of impacts of climate change on projects.
  • The CSS brings additional analysis on climate risks, aiming at increasing the consideration of climate change in project design and minimizing the impacts of climate change on projects
  • This contributes also to incorporate best practices on adaptation into SESA process.
  • The current exercise will be completed by August 2011, with the outlook to be incorporated into the Integrated Safeguards System (ISS)
slide30

For more information:

Web site:

www.afdb.org

E-mail:

climatechange@afdb.org