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Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

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Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

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  1. Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts English Language Arts Boot Camp Grades 6-12 June 2014

  2. Agenda • Organization of the CCSS for ELA • Shifts in the CCSS for ELA • Staircase to Mastery • Unpacking the Standards • PARCC Assessment • MDE Resources

  3. Organization of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts (CCSS for ELA)

  4. love

  5. religion

  6. divorce

  7. pogonotrophy

  8. osculum

  9. Organization of the CCSS for ELA • Introduction • Three main sections • K-5 (comprehensive and cross-disciplinary) • 6-12 English Language Arts • 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects • Three appendices • Appendix A: Research supporting key elements of the standards (includes text complexity) and glossary of key terms • Appendix B: Reading text exemplars and sample performance tasks • Appendix C: Annotated student writing samples

  10. Organization of the CCSS for ELA

  11. Organization of the CCSS for ELA • Four Strands of Standards • Reading(R) • RL (Reading Standards: Literature) • RI (Reading Standards: Informational Text) • RF (Reading Standards: Foundational Skills) • Writing (W) • Speaking and Listening (SL) • Language (L)

  12. Organization of the CCSS for ELA

  13. Organization of ELA CCSS Anchor Standard

  14. Organization of the CCSS for ELA

  15. Visualizing Labels 1) Strand 2) Grade Level or Band 3) Grade Specific Standard RI.9-10.2

  16. Major Shifts in the CCSS for ELA

  17. Major Shift # 1:Literary and Informational Texts • Students must be able to read literary and informational texts. • The CCSS for ELA does not reduce the importance of literature. • Informational text includes social studies, science, technical subjects, etc. • Students will build knowledge in the content areas.

  18. Literary vs. Informational Texts • Imagine a 12th grade student. They may spend 30% of their day in a class that requires reading of literary text. What type of reading is the student doing the remaining 70% of the day?

  19. Major Shift # 2:Staircase of Complexity • Students will read grade-level appropriate text. • These texts will vary in complexity, from readily accessible to very complex. • Teachers will provide ample time and scaffolding to help students closely read the varied complexities of text.

  20. Major Shift # 3:Writing to Text • Students will write about what they read. • Writing takes on many forms, including narrative, informational, and opinion/argumentative writing. • Students should not be writing about disconnected, random topics (i.e., what I did on mysummer vacation). • Narrative writing, while based on text, still allows for creativity. • The focus of writing is content, not process.

  21. Staircase to Mastery

  22. Staircase to Mastery:Reading Literature Taken from the CCSS for ELA

  23. Staircase to Mastery:Reading Literature Taken from the CCSS for ELA

  24. Staircase to Mastery: Writing Taken from the CCSS for ELA

  25. Work Session # 1Staircase to Mastery Locate Work Session # 1 Directions: Read standard RI.3 across the grade levels. With one colored highlighter, highlight what is consistent from one grade to the next. With a different colored highlighter, highlight what changes from grade to grade. Note the instructional implications of these changes and report out to your group.

  26. Unpacking the CCSS for ELA

  27. Steps for Unpacking the Common Core State Standards • “Study” the CCSS as a Professional Learning Community (PLC). • Identify prerequisite skills. • Identify the key terms and verbs directly (or indirectly) stated within the standard. • Give a definition for each term and verb. • Provide “student-friendly language” for each term and verb. • Create a series of essential questions. • Create a series of “I can” statements in “student friendly language”.

  28. The Standard L.11-12.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.11-12.1b Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage, Garner’s Modern American Usage) as needed.

  29. Prerequisite Skills • Understand and use the conventions of standard written English. • Understand and use tools that aid in determining standard English conventions (e.g., Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage, Garner’s Modern American Usage).

  30. Work Session # 2Part A: Prerequisite Skills L.9-10.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. L.9-10.2aUse a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses. L.9-10.2bUse a colon to introduce a list or quotation. L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. Locate Work Session # 2. Directions: Using the blank Unpacking the CCSS handout, identify the prerequisite skills that students need to master the sub-standard.

  31. Key Vocabulary • references • consult • conventions • complex • contested • usage

  32. Work Session # 2Part B: Key Terms L.9-10.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. L.9-10.2a Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses. L.9-10.2b Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation. L.9-10.2c  Spell correctly. Locate Work Session # 2. Directions: Using the blank Unpacking the CCSS handout, identify the key terms (vocabulary) and create student friendly definitions.

  33. Key Verbs • resolve • consult • use

  34. Work Session # 2Part C: Key Verbs L.9-10.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. L.9-10.2a Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses. L.9-10.2b Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation. L.9-10.2c  Spell correctly. Locate Work Session # 2. Directions: Using the blank Unpacking the CCSS handout, identify key verbs or actions students must DO, and create student friendly definitions.

  35. Essential Questions • What are the conventions of standard English? • How do you use the specific conventions? • What tools can be used to help determining which conventions should be used? • How do these tools work? • How do you determine why and how some conventions are contested? • How do you determine the correct usage with complex, contested conventions?

  36. Work Session # 2Part D: Essential Questions L.9-10.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. L.9-10.2a Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses. L.9-10.2b Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation. L.9-10.2c  Spell correctly. Locate Work Session # 2. Directions: Using the blank Unpacking the CCSS handout, identify the essential questions that a student can answer at the end of the lesson.

  37. “I can…” Statements • I can identify the conventions of standard English. • I can use the conventions of standard English. • I can identify and use tools to help use the conventions of English. • I can explain the contested conventions of standard English. • I can determine the correct usage of complex, contested conventions.

  38. Work Session # 2Part E: “I can…” Statements L.9-10.2  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. L.9-10.2a Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses. L.9-10.2b Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation. L.9-10.2c  Spell correctly. Locate Work Session # 2. Directions: Using the blank Unpacking the CCSS handout, create “I can…” statements, identifying what a student should be able to do at the end of the lesson.

  39. PARCC Assessment

  40. PARCCSummative Assessment

  41. Three Innovative Item Types • Evidence Based Selected Response (EBSR)—Combines a traditional selected-response question with a second selected-response question that asks students to show evidence from the text. • Technology Enhanced Constructed Response (TECR)—Uses technology (e.g., drag and drop, cut and paste, shade text, move items to show relationships). • Range of Prose Constructed Responses (PCR)—Elicits evidence that students have understood a text or texts they have read. Taken from PARCC ELA/Literacy Sample Illustrative Items PowerPoint

  42. PARCC Summative Assessment:Performance Based Assessment

  43. Task Generation Models • Only used for the PBA • Identifies the task focus • Provides the number of texts, EBSR, TECR, and PCR Items • Provides the standards to be measured in the PCR and the EBSR and TECR items • Explains the order of the task

  44. Each task generation model has a Task Focus. The task focus indicates the purpose for reading and writing that should drive item development for that task. The reading standards measured by the final prose constructed response link directly to this task focus. The scenario developed for the task must align with this task focus. Each task generation model is labeled with the type of task (Research Task, Literary Analysis Task, Narrative Writing Task) and the model #. In this case, we see the label says “Research Task” and the model # is 11B8. The model # is coded where the first number represents the grade (in this instance 11th grade), the letter reinforces the type of task (where A=Literary Task, B=Research Task, C=Narrative Writing Task, in this instance Research Task) and the final number represents the version of the task, in this case this is the 8th 11th grade research task model developed. The number and type of texts tells how many texts are read by the student when the student completes the task. It also tells whether the text is a literary text or an informational text and whether the text is extended (close in word count to the maximum allowed at a given grade). In the MY and PBA, those texts not designated as extended are assumed to be short or medium in length (may fall between the minimum and middle of the range of word counts for a given grade). There are three task types, Research, Literary Analysis, and Narrative Writing. The Grade may be any grade 3-11. Taken from http://www.parcconline.org/sites/parcc/files/Item%20Guidelines%20%2004%2025%202013%20Version%208_0.pdf Handout # 1

  45. The task generation model indicates the number and type of Prose Constructed Response Items and designates for each prose constructed response in a task model the reading standards that are measured by the prose constructed response items. This information is essential for item developers for three reasons: (1) it indicates how many PCR items are to be written; (2) it indicates the writing focal points for the task; (3) the final PCR item sets the task focus (purpose for reading/writing) and thus the scenario for all tasks generated with the task generation model. The task generation model also includes information about the number and type of EBSR and TECR items. The most important information in this box are the specific reading standards that are to be measured by the EBSR and TECR items for this task generation model. In this example, we see that the EBSR and/or TECR items generated from this task generation model will elicit evidences for student understandings of RH 3,5,6,7, and 8. The information in this box is also found on the forms specifications document for the grade level. Taken from http://www.parcconline.org/sites/parcc/files/Item%20Guidelines%20%2004%2025%202013%20Version%208_0.pdf Handout # 1

  46. Taken from http://www.parcconline.org/sites/parcc/files/Item%20Guidelines%20%2004%2025%202013%20Version%208_0.pdf Handout # 1

  47. PARCC Summative AssessmentEnd-of-Year Assessment (EOY)