how to survive as a corporate innovation champion american creativity association march 14 2003 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
HOW TO SURVIVE AS A CORPORATE INNOVATION CHAMPION American Creativity Association March 14, 2003 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
HOW TO SURVIVE AS A CORPORATE INNOVATION CHAMPION American Creativity Association March 14, 2003

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 71

HOW TO SURVIVE AS A CORPORATE INNOVATION CHAMPION American Creativity Association March 14, 2003 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 137 Views
  • Uploaded on

HOW TO SURVIVE AS A CORPORATE INNOVATION CHAMPION American Creativity Association March 14, 2003. Jack Hipple, Innovation-TRIZ Tampa, FL jwhinnovator@earthlink.net www.innovation-triz.com. QUESTIONS. ARE YOU AN INNOVATION CHAMPION? IN WHAT CONTEXT? HAVE YOU SURVIVED?

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'HOW TO SURVIVE AS A CORPORATE INNOVATION CHAMPION American Creativity Association March 14, 2003' - metta


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
how to survive as a corporate innovation champion american creativity association march 14 2003

HOW TO SURVIVE AS A CORPORATE INNOVATION CHAMPIONAmerican Creativity AssociationMarch 14, 2003

Jack Hipple, Innovation-TRIZ

Tampa, FL

jwhinnovator@earthlink.net

www.innovation-triz.com

questions
QUESTIONS

ARE YOU AN INNOVATION CHAMPION?

IN WHAT CONTEXT?

HAVE YOU SURVIVED?

DO YOU WANT TO BE ONE?

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO DO TO SUCCEED?

mbti 16 types kai bcpi

MBTI/16 Types/KAI/BCPI

KNOWLEDGE OF INSTRUMENTS

PROFILES

i why is this topic important
Corporations are constantly looking for inventions, acquisitions, collaborations, and processes which can allow them to grow at a rate faster than the GDP of the country/world--and faster than their competitors!

Many unsuccessful attempts have been made to sustain internal efforts to support these goals--nearly all have been terminated (sometimes restarted years later!)

These efforts have spent HUNDREDS of millions of dollars!

Perception that there are untapped ideas within the organization

Even perceived “successes” have seen downsizings eventually

What/where are the learnings as we start the cycle all over again?

I. WHY IS THIS TOPIC IMPORTANT?
why is this important
WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?
  • Previous leaders of these programs, for the most part, are in successful consulting businesses or start-up companies--major corporations have lost them--probably forever
  • Their clients frequently include ex-employers!
  • Learnings? It seems we are starting all over again!
association for managers of innovation ami
ASSOCIATION FOR MANAGERS OF INNOVATION (AMI)
  • An informal group of 50 innovators, most of whom have (had) responsibility for innovation programs within large companies, government agencies, or non-profits
  • Meets twice yearly (once at a Center for Creative Leadership location, once at company location) with outside stimulus speakers and sharing of experiences
  • Active since 1986 and still going strong
  • Sponsored by Stan Gryskiewiecz at CCL
an observation was made
AN OBSERVATION WAS MADE…..
  • A large percentage of corporate innovation managers had become consultants or joined start-ups, after downsizings and early retirements
  • These were usually associated with termination of the function
  • With further passage of time, the percentage rose more, with 15 people (out of 30-40 active members) identified
  • Note: trend has continued
ami decided to
AMI DECIDED TO…..
  • Survey and study this phenomenon
      • Jack Hipple, Innovation-TRIZ
      • David Hardy, Bank of Montreal
      • Steve Wilson, Eastman Chemical
      • James Michalski, Eastman Chemical
  • See if there were any learnings that could be shared
  • Publish if possible
results
RESULTS
  • Study completed in late 2000
  • Publication complete
    • Chemical Innovation, 11/01
    • Leaders in Action, 5/02
    • Research Technology Management, Spring ‘03
  • Presentation at World Future Society (7/01), CPSI meeting (6/02), Innovation Network (9/02) and today
  • Input to Harvard Business review article on innovation
  • Results can be shared anonymously
  • Findings significant
  • Additional data is supportive (5)
learnings from study
LEARNINGS FROM STUDY
  • Significant differences between “styles” of innovation champions and “norm” around them
  • KAI™ and Myers Briggs analyses can help assess
  • Personal learnings and experiences--what would be done differently?

KAI is a registered trademark of M.J. Kirton

myers briggs
MYERS-BRIGGS
  • A tool which measures our “style” of social interaction and how we analyze external information
    • Extraverted/introverted (E/I)
    • Sensing/intuition (S/N)
    • Thinking/feeling (T/F)
    • Perceiving/judging (P/J)
    • 16 possible combinations
      • Ex: ESTJ, INTP
      • Not equally likely
      • The world is 75% E’s, 75% S’s
myers briggs14
MYERS BRIGGS
  • 90% of innovation champs were “NT’s”
  • Less than 10% of the population are “NT’s”
  • >80% of corporate senior managers are “ST’s”, typically ESTJ’s
  • This sets up major potential conflict
impact of mbti deltas
IMPACT OF MBTI DELTAS
  • Change always seems bigger to an “ST” than an “NT”
  • “NT’s” are more comfortable with change in general
  • If desired change is not defined clearly, conflicts will result
examples
EXAMPLES….
  • “We need to do different things in this company…”
    • Does this mean get into an entirely new business, make an acquisition?
    • Does this mean we need to process existing orders more efficiently?
a company can have a culture
A COMPANY CAN HAVE A CULTURE….
  • SJ---Likes stage gates, continuous improvement teams
  • NJ---Likes targeted breakthroughs
  • SP---Continuous improvement, bottoms up
  • NP---Internal venturing, sustaining ideas
the kai instrument

THE KAI™ INSTRUMENT

KAI is a registered trademark of M.J. Kirton

what kai measures
WHAT KAI MEASURES
  • Myers Briggs measures how people relate to each other
  • KAI measures how people relate to problems--their problem solving style
  • Instrument sub-scales measure originality, rule/group conformity, and efficiency
the instrument
THE INSTRUMENT
  • A 32 question assessment with a range of responses
  • Range of score, 32-160

(32 questions X (1-5) response

  • 15-20 minutes to complete
  • Highly validated across many areas and cultures globally
  • Dr. Michael Kirton, Occupational Research Centre, Hatfield Polytechnic Institute, England
  • Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN
the instrument21
THE INSTRUMENT
  • Measures how we relate to “problems” and the problem solving environment vs. how we relate to people
  • “Norm” of population is around 90 with the majority of people in the 70-120 range (highly adaptive to highly innovative)
kai differences
KAI DIFFERENCES
  • Managerial “norm” is 95
  • Total norm around 90
  • Average of innovation champs was 135
  • Friction visible with differentials of 10-15
  • Warfare visible with differentials of 30+
impact of kai deltas
IMPACT OF KAI DELTAS…..
  • Replacing vs. improving
  • Reaction to internal vs. external threats
  • Appreciation for detail
  • “Right” vs. risk
other tools
OTHER TOOLS
  • Alternative tools for evaluation
    • BCPI
    • 16 Types
    • Gatehouse Alliance Discovery/Insights
what do we do in these cases
WHAT DO WE DO IN THESE CASES?

DISLIKE

ATTITUDE

TOWARD

PERSON

LIKE

HIGH

LOW

Source: Charlie Prather

NOVELTY OF IDEA

acceptance of person
ACCEPTANCE OF PERSON

DISLIKE

IGNORE

SABOTAGE

ATTITUDE

TOWARD

PERSON

SUPPORT

ENCOURAGE

HELP

LIKE

HIGH

LOW

Source: Charlie Prather

NOVELTY OF IDEA

what happens to ideas
WHAT HAPPENS TO IDEAS?

EQUIVOCALITY

HIGH

LOW

MOTIVATION

DISTANCE

HIGH

LOW

COMMUNICATION

Source: National Center for Mfg Sciences Study

acceptance of idea
ACCEPTANCE OF IDEA

EQUIVOCALITY

HIGH

LOW

MOTIVATION

DISTANCE

BLACK HOLE

GRAND SLAM

DEAD IN THE WATER

LONG SHOT

HIGH

LOW

COMMUNICATION

Source: National Center for Mfg Sciences Study

unanswered question
UNANSWERED QUESTION

If less “different” people were put in these assignments, what would have happened?

What do you think?

what s been tried
WHAT’S BEEN TRIED?
  • A specially funded “enterprise”, usually under the umbrella of the R&D organization
  • Funding usually (but not always) outside the control of existing business units and sometimes at the expense of these existing businesses
  • Sometimes combined with other corporate initiatives in acquisitions or venture capital efforts
  • Sometimes minimally funded for support staff only--”can’t fund and can’t say no”---primary responsibility was encouragement, moral support, and guidance
  • Programs sometimes focused around a unique physical facility
  • Leadership of program frequently in the hands of one key senior leader
what worked
WHAT WORKED
  • Ideas were stimulated and new businesses were started
  • R&D personnel were allowed to explore outside their normal focus area
  • Special meetings, demonstrations, exercises highlighted the importance of the activity and demonstrated support
  • New tools and techniques were introduced
personal learnings from study
PERSONAL LEARNINGSFROM STUDY
  • Broader support and involvement beyond one executive (especially one near retirement age!)--don’t depend on the energy and drive of one person
  • Top level support
  • Understand political and business cultures, recognize you may be a threat to someone
  • More education on role of innovation
  • Succession planning
  • Treat as a business process
  • Use the “coin of the realm” in discussions and planning
  • Corporate, not a research process
    • Marketing/commercial involvement and support
  • Share successes AND failures
  • Share process successes
what didn t work
WHAT DIDN’T WORK
  • Ideas, in general, were not integrated with complete corporate business structure and environment
  • New business $ not at the rate desired
  • Ignorance of the amount of effort and investment required to change the corporate climate and/or business
  • Business/commercial involvement after the fact caused priority conflicts and resentment
  • Virtually no involvement of the sales/marketing organization
  • Time horizons and impact poorly estimated
  • Narrow and individual sponsorship
    • “get the bandit on board the train”----Charlie Prather
  • Lack of skill training
consequences
CONSEQUENCES
  • Subtle forms of sabotage
  • Corruption of funding process
  • Lack of staying power during economic downturns
  • Program “died” with the loss of sponsor
  • Maybe this wasn’t such a good idea after all
  • Uneven skill and tool training produced uneven results across an organization
sabotage and corruption
SABOTAGE AND CORRUPTION
  • Funding of “normal” business projects under the innovation umbrella
    • “Perceived” innovation funding greater than actual
  • Credibility of program suffers over time--deliverables vs. spending
  • Simple competition for $$
concepts proved valid
CONCEPTS PROVED VALID
  • People within an organization DO have new and unique ideas
  • There ARE new business opportunities which will not be discovered by normal business visions and processes
  • Independent funding mechanisms, no matter what kind, can stimulate different activities
concepts proved invalid
CONCEPTS PROVED INVALID
  • A single location (“creativity centers”), by itself, within an organization, can facilitate broad organizational innovation
  • The R&D function can do it alone, or in spite of other functions
recent business trends
RECENT BUSINESS TRENDS
  • Customer driven vs. technology driven ---the balance has shifted significantly
  • Core competencies being used to identify focus areas and frequently used as shadow organization structures
  • Alliances and strategic partnerships that are not necessarily permanent
  • New problem solving tools
      • scientific vs. psychological
  • “Business” teams and organizations vs. functional leadership of activities
recent personnel trends
RECENT PERSONNEL TRENDS
  • Dramatic decline in loyalty, downsizings
  • Increased specialization
  • “Temporary” assignments and more rapid turnover

Impact

Capturing and broadening of intellectual property (not just patents, but “know how”) much more important AND difficult

slide41

TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENT VS. TIME

Desired

Advancement

Actual

Time

a dramatic change
A DRAMATIC CHANGE….

GENERATING

COST OF INFORMATION

Source: Jim Palmer, P&G

DISSEMINATING

TIME

cost of information
COST OF INFORMATION…..
  • Generation
    • Must be right in the first place
    • Must be focused on the right problem
    • Problem definition more critical than ever
    • Must be protected and provide value
  • Dissemination
    • Retrieval
    • Access
long term business trends not cycles
LONG TERM BUSINESS TRENDS (NOT CYCLES)

Emergent Action Rational Action Constrained action

Charismatic Leadership

Creative Network

Conservation

CRISIS

CHOICE

Confusion

Strategic Management

Entrepreneurial action

Source: Crisis and Renewal, David Hurst, Harvard Business School Press, 1995

money isn t everything but it s right up there with oxygen rita davenport entrepreneur
“Money isn’t everything…..but it’s right up there with oxygen”

Rita Davenport, Entrepreneur

functional integration
FUNCTIONAL INTEGRATION
  • All innovation efforts and initiatives must include or have a mechanism to trigger inclusion of the commercial and manufacturing base of the organization
    • Who is going to buy?
    • How are we going to make?
    • Do we have the required competencies?
    • Should we license and/or find a partner?
identification and assessment
IDENTIFICATION AND ASSESSMENT
  • These skills are not usually present in one individual--must be paired up early
  • Can be a great mechanism to involve commercial organization
  • Simple skills can be taught and learned by everyone
  • What happens if this actually works as planned?
    • The new monomer example
    • The B-2 bomber
long term trend assessments
LONG TERM TREND ASSESSMENTS
  • What is affecting your customer? Their customer?
  • What could put both of you out of business?
  • What are the impacts of broad new trends?
  • Lines of evolution from TRIZ methodology
useful techniques
USEFUL TECHNIQUES
  • Simulate emergencies, surprises
  • Deliberate articulated strategies
  • Expansion of core competencies
  • Separate thinking from criticism (Six Hats™ process)
  • Corporate crusades
  • Meetings and visiting with totally unrelated people and technologies

™APTT and Edward DeBono organization

™Six Hats is a registered trademark of Edward DeBono and APTT

is a center needed
IS A “CENTER” NEEDED?
  • In large companies, probably not
  • Leadership, continuity, facilities when needed are more important
  • Networking capability more important than a “room”
  • Globally used processes, integrated into daily efforts, are critically important
peter drucker 1982
Peter Drucker, 1982

“Innovative companies do not start out with a research budget. They end with one. They start out by determining how much innovation is needed for the business to stay even. They assume that all existing products, services, and markets are becoming obsolete--and pretty fast at that. They try to assess the probable speed of decay of whatever exists, and then determine the “gap” which innovation has to fill for the company not to go downhill. They know that their program must include promises several times the “innovation gap”, for more than a third of such promises--if that many-- ever becomes reality. And then they know how much of an innovation effort--and how large the innovative budget--they need as the very minimum”

hamel and prahalad
Hamel and Prahalad

“Slimming down the workforce and cutting back on investment are less intellectually demanding for top management than discovering ways to grow output on a static or only slowing growing resource base. Cutting the buck is easier than expanding the band; thus organizations prefer the former over the latter. Managers and operational improvement consultants must ask themselves just how much of the efficiency problem they’re working on. If their view of “efficiency” encompasses only the denominator, if they don’t have a view of resource leverage that addresses the numerator, they have no better than half a chance of achieving and sustaining world class efficiency”

hamel and prahalad 2
Hamel and Prahalad (2)

“Few companies seem to have asked themselves what is the opportunity cost of the hundreds of millions--or even billions-- of dollars that have been written off for re-engineering and restructuring. What if all that “redundant” brain power had been applied to creating tomorrow’s markets? Far from being a tribute to senior management’s steely resolve or far-sightedness, a large restructuring and re-engineering charge is simply the penalty that a company must pay for not having anticipated the future”

…Competing for the Future

desi desimone ex ceo 3m
Desi DeSimone, ex CEO, 3M

“Why did you get into a position that you had to lay off a bunch of people? How come you’re so smart now that you’ve laid off a bunch of people?”

Fortune, 1985

how do you know if it s going well
HOW DO YOU KNOW IF IT’S GOING WELL?
  • You are getting unsolicited business plans
  • People are trying to replace your existing business
  • Ideas from strange places and meetings
  • Hiring changes
conclusion corporate innovation can be done right

CONCLUSION: CORPORATE INNOVATION CAN BE DONE RIGHT

Learnings can be applied to any situation

questions to answer
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

What is the objective of the organizational innovation program? State clearly in relation to the current organizational or business objective.

Do you personally understand the objective?

questions to answer63
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

What is the current climate inside the organization?

How do you know?

How was it measured?

Does your management know?

How are you going to get this information?

questions to answer64
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

What is the potential gap between the objective of the organizational transformation and the current organizational climate?

How are you going to close it?

questions to answer65
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

Who is going to lead this transformation?

What is their “style”?

questions to answer66
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

What is the “style” of the managers to whom this activity will report?

questions to answer67
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

How large is the gap between (4) and (5)?

How do you plan to close this gap of behavior and understanding?

questions to answer68
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

How deep is the senior management support for this activity?

questions to answer69
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

How will success be measured?

By whom?

How often?

questions to answer70
QUESTIONS TO ANSWER

What is the time frame for implementation and impact?

Who decided?

How realistic is it?

personal suggestions
PERSONAL SUGGESTIONS
  • Recognize you are different and adjust!
  • Translate for those around you
  • Make sure you understand what the goal is--do not assume you know or don’t need input