NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS

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  1. NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS http://www.timessquarenyc.org/new-years-eve/index.aspx New York

  2. New york new year • Every year as the clock nears midnight on December 31st, the eyes of the world turn once more to the dazzling lights and bustling energy of Times Square. Anticipation runs high. New Year's Eve at the symbolic center of New York City has become more than just a celebration - it's a global tradition. • The world holds its breath...and cheers as the clocks strike twelve. • As the famous New Year's Eve Ball descends from the flagpole atop One Times Square, an estimated one million people in Times Square, millions nationwide and over a billion watching throughout the world are united in bidding a collective farewell to the departing year, and expressing our joy and hope for the year ahead. http://www.timessquarenyc.org/new-years-eve/index.aspx

  3. An object dropped or raised on New Year's Eve refers to the ball which reaches the bottom or top of a lighted tower at midnight. The arrival of the ball launches a display of fireworks. The special effect of the ball drop is designed like the time balls used in the 19th century.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_objects_dropped_on_New_Year%27s_Eve • Kissing after the ball dropping The Times Square Ball.

  4. http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/12/29/opinion/20090101-NEWYEARS_11.htmlhttp://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/12/29/opinion/20090101-NEWYEARS_11.html • In Britain and Ireland, the first person to cross the threshold on New Year's Day is considered to be a harbinger of the household's luck for the year. Tradition holds that the "first foot" should belong to a tall, healthy, strapping dark-haired man, carrying symbols of abundance for the home: coal for the fire, bread for the table and whiskey for the head of the household.

  5. In many cultures, fireworks are a symbol of light in the new year. While they are restricted the rest of the year in Iceland, on New Year's Eve anyone and everyone can light the explosives.

  6. Colombians and other South Americans who would like to travel in the coming 12 months walk around their house with a suitcase.

  7. A tradition that began in Spain has been adopted in many Spanish-speaking countries: people eat one grape for every stroke of the clock at midnight, symbolizing luck for each month of the year.

  8. On New Year's Day in parts of Switzerland, people allow a drop of cream to hit the floor, to ensure overflowing abundance in the coming year.

  9. At midnight, the Danes make a wish as they jump off chairs — literally leaping into the new year.

  10. Many Filipinos wear new clothes with deep pockets. They fill their pockets with coins and fresh bills on New Year's Eve, and at midnight, they shake them noisily to attract prosperity in the coming year.

  11. In Ashikaga, Japan, people participate in the AkutareMatsuri, or the Festival of Abusive Language. They climb a hill to the 1,200-year-old Saishoji temple while screaming curses and railing at employers, teachers, politicians. After that catharsis, they welcome the new year with ceremonies in the temple to allow happiness to flow in the coming months.

  12. Buying and wearing new clothes, especially in red or yellow, is a common ritual. In Venezuela, people give each other yellow underwear to wear into the new year for good luck.

  13. How do you celebrate New Year in your country?