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Creative Strategy Week 5. Turn in homework Pick up your work. Last Week’s Assignments. Sensination “A” (sounds like, smells like, feels like, tastes like, etc) Bring “conceptual stretch” to all your work—you’ll be more creative Killer Insight Article

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creative strategy week 5

Creative Strategy Week 5

Turn in homework

Pick up your work

last week s assignments
Last Week’s Assignments
  • Sensination “A” (sounds like, smells like, feels like, tastes like, etc)
    • Bring “conceptual stretch” to all your work—you’ll be more creative
  • Killer Insight Article
    • Demonstrated understanding that depth of insight drives bad, good, or great output—don’t make the creative team do it alone!
    • You understand the concept of insights vs. data and information—keep insights in mind as you give professional input to anyone, for anything

People who make the implicit explicit are always in demand

last week s assignments3
Last Week’s Assignments
  • Big Idea identification and refinement
    • Struggled to improve the Big Idea; most ended up adjusting execution
    • To get better:“What point are we trying to make, and how can it be better made?”
    • Rationales were pretty good
    • Presentations were pretty good
      • Know your point for each section/topic
      • Watch flow of logic
      • More confidence; relax
      • More volume
      • More eye contact
presenting creative
Presenting Creative
  • Set up
  • Reveal
  • Justification
  • Close

The New Account Manager, Don Dickinson

the set up
The Set Up
  • (typically) Presented by an account manager and/or account planner
  • Tell a story
  • Open doors, one at a time
    • Objectives for the ad/campaign
    • Challenges to overcome
    • Audience Insights and relevance to creative
    • Product Insights and relevance to creative
    • Creative Strategy as basis for creative development
the reveal
The Reveal
  • (typically) Presented by the creative team
  • Telling a story; why the approach, why the specifics
  • (typically) Concepts presented with headlines and layout
  • There MUST be a strong connection between the creative workand the story/information presented in the set-up
  • If you’re presenting creative work you MUST know how and why the team came up with their approach, or you can’t present it well
the justification
The Justification
  • (typically) Group discussion follows the set up and reveal
  • Client provides initial reaction and asks questions
  • This is a post-presentation--you’ll learn what was understood
  • Confidence, enthusiasm, a willingness to listen are paramount
    • You’re not “selling”—you’re consulting, working for the best solution
  • Know your audience insights, product insights and rationale!!!
    • Even if the creative isn’t approved you want the client to believe your recommendation was well founded and strategically correct
  • It isn’t about what everybody likes, it’s about what’s going to work
the close
The Close
  • KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE INSIGHTS, PRODUCT INSIGHTS, AND RATIONALE!
  • As an agency person:
    • Focus dialog on motivating consumers/customers to accomplish objective(s)
  • As a client:
    • Focus dialog on the best work possible, that will accomplish objective(s)
  • Clients usually want to “sleep on it”
  • Off-line conversations are often the most important part of getting work approved
content vs presentation

To Win

Typical

Activity

Time

Content vs. Presentation
  • Content: 100%
  • Presentation: 100%
  • Key point: you can’t wait ‘till the last minute to do the work;the presentation is as important as the work itself
the meeting is the media
The Meeting is the Media
  • Or, selling an idea can be harder than having one
  • Visualize the meeting
    • How big is the room?
    • Where is the wall?
    • Who’s in the audience? Where (do you want them) seated?
    • You’ll have to make an impact in that space; own the room with the power of your work
  • Attack the wall
    • Give the meeting a theme
    • Get the theme up big
    • Use simple right-brain visuals to go with all the left-brain verbiage
    • If you don’t do the meeting right, the ads will never run
    • If an internal meeting, worse yet, another team will win
a few tidbits
A Few Tidbits
  • You fail if people say “what a great presentation”
    • You want: “You made me think” or “You changed my mind”
    • Best is: “You’re hired!”
  • Your purpose is to move the decision-maker from the place s/he is to the place you want her/him to be
    • Key: you need to know in advance where you want them to be
  • “A convincing impossibility is often preferable to an unconvincing possibility”
    • Or, it’s about winning, not accuracy. Ouch, but true
    • It had better work

Perfect Pitch, Jon Steel

presentation concepts
Presentation Concepts
  • Have a point
  • Understand the needs of the audience
  • Communicate rather than lecture
  • Have a clear flow
  • No more detail than necessary to make your point

Perfect Pitch, Jon Steel

presentation preparation
Presentation Preparation
  • Gather raw materials—don’t jump straight to solution
  • Look for meaning, and connections in the information
  • Set it aside—percolate for a while
  • Adapt and distill—patience, diligence, don’t stop short of a great central idea
  • Write the presentation—a presentation is much more than its message

Perfect Pitch, Jon Steel

in class 6
In-Class #6

Analogies & Metaphors as Creative Thinking Tools

hw 4 building another brief
HW #4: Building another Brief
  • Pick a print ad
  • Define “Why We’re Doing This” and defend (write a rationale)
    • Remember from Week 1? Yeah, I’m sure you do 
      • Increase Knowledge
      • Change Attitude
      • Stimulate Desired Behaviors
  • Research audience; write Audience Insights and defend (write a rationale)
    • Points for this will be based on personification of the audience, insights from the research, and the research to back it up
  • Turn both in next week: 5 bonus points to anyone who emails these to me by 7:00 a.m. Sunday May 4 (mjheiser@gmail.com)
    • Next week’s in-class will be reviewing and discussing these sections
start online
Start Online
  • Mintel
  • Demographics: 18,500,000 for demographics (0.06 seconds)
  • Buying patterns: 471,000 for buying patterns (0.14 seconds)
  • Yankelovich: http://www.yankelovich.com/
  • American Demographics Magazine
  • Youth: http://www.civicyouth.org/
  • US Demographic Reporting Services:
    • http://www.demoreports.com/index.html
  • US Census
    • http://censtats.census.gov/pub/Profiles.shtml
    • http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/index.html
google buying patterns
Google: Buying Patterns

Buying Patterns of Women

[PDF]

Consumer Behavior and Buying Patterns

Association for Consumer Research

Buying patterns in e-commerce - The Industrial Physicist

slide21

FACT SHEET

CIRCLEThe Center for Information & Research on

Civic Learning & Engagement

    • Youth Demographics
    • After several years of decline, the population of young people has begun to grow, and in the coming years will grow to rival the size of the baby boomer generation. The estimated number of young people between the ages of 15 and 25 in 2000 was 42.2 million. And young citizens between the ages of 0 and 17 in 2000 numbered close to 72.4 million, rivaling the size of the baby boomer generation in 2000 which numbered an estimated 77.6 million adults between the ages of 36 and 54, though young people continue to represent a declining share of the resident population.
    • Table 1 – Resident Youth Population Estimates, In Millions
      • 15-25 15-17 18-19 20-21 22-25 0-17
  • 1972 *** *** 7.5 7.0 13.6 ***
  • 1974 *** *** 7.8 7.5 13.8 ***
  • 1976 43.0 12.5 8.1 7.8 14.5 ***
  • 1978 43.7 12.3 8.2 8.1 15.1 62.9
  • 1980 43.7 11.8 8.1 8.1 15.7 61.7
  • 1982 44.1 11.1 8.0 8.2 16.9 62.5
  • 1984 42.9 10.7 7.4 7.9 16.8 62.5
  • 1986 41.7 11.1 7.1 7.3 16.1 63.3
  • 1988 40.2 10.5 7.3 7.0 15.4 63.7
  • 1990 38.6 9.9 7.1 7.4 14.2 65.0
  • 1992 38.2 10.1 6.6 6.8 14.7 66.9
  • 1994 40.1 11.1 6.9 7.0 15.2 70.4
  • 1996 40.2 11.6 7.3 6.9 14.4 71.5
  • 1998 40.6 11.8 7.9 7.2 13.7 71.7
  • 2000 42.2 12.3 8.0 7.6 14.5 72.4
extra credit 2 advertising legends
George Lois

Patricia Martin

Jane Newman

David Ogilvy

John Powers

Rosser Reeves

Helen Lansdowne Resor

Extra Credit #2: Advertising Legends

Max five points each legend; max three legends: possible 15 points

  • Ted Bates
  • Bill Bernbach
  • Leo Burnett
  • John Caples
  • Jay Chiat
  • Phil Dusenberry
  • Al Lasker
  • Hal Riney
  • Ray Rubicam
  • Mary Wells Lawrence
  • Janet L Wolff
  • Les Wunderman
  • James Webb Young
  • This legend’s point-of-view regarding the creation of advertising
  • The impact of this legend’s point-of-view on developing advertising at the time
  • How this legend’s approach to developing ads is relevant to today’s advertising
we re way
We’re ½ Way!
  • Homework #4
    • Extra 5 points if submitted via email by 7:00 a.m. Sunday, May 4
    • Hard copy due beginning of class Tuesday, May 6
  • Extra Credit #2
    • Due beginning of class May 6