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Fire ground Procedures and Command Modes. For a number of years the VRFA has used terminology on scene of an incident that was consistent with Zone 3 practices. Some of this terminology has changed; other departments in the zone have made the switch; now we are making the switch also.

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fire ground procedures and command modes
Fire ground Procedures and Command Modes

For a number of years the VRFA has used terminology on scene of an incident that was consistent with Zone 3 practices.

Some of this terminology has changed; other departments in the zone have made the switch; now we are making the switch also.

The new terminology is adopted from the Model Procedures Guide for Firefighting. In 2009 the King County Chiefs implemented the Fire ground Procedures Policy that addresses this issue.

The following slides will address only the terminology changes that are affecting the VRFA

command options
Command Options
  • Investigation Mode
  • Fast-Attack Mode
  • Command Mode

**Note – “Rescue Mode” is not a command option

investigation mode
Investigation Mode
  • Formerly called “Nothing Visible” mode

Upon arrival, an incident may not have visible indicators of a significant event. These situations generally require investigation by the first arriving company, while other responding companies remain staged. The officer of the first-in company should assume command and go with the company to investigate, using a portable radio to command the incident.

**Note – In this situation this officer may not formally establish command on the radio right away, but it is known that this first-in officer is commanding the incident in the “Investigation Mode” until relieved.

**Note – It is still appropriate to say “Nothing visible, investigating” when warranted.

fast attack mode
Fast Attack Mode
  • This is used when the first-in company officer needs to “go to work” with their crew (i.e. rescue or offensive attack).

Situations that require immediate action to stabilize the incident mandate the company officers assistance to carry out the critical operation. In these situations, the company officers goes with the crew to provide the appropriate level of supervision. Examples of these situations include: (See next slide)

fast attack mode examples
Fast Attack Mode Examples
  • Offensive Fire Attack
  • Critical Life Safety Situations (i.e.. Rescues) that must be achieved in a compressed time
  • Any incident where the safety and welfare of responders are of major concern
fast attack mode examples1
Fast Attack Mode Examples
  • Examples of new terminology;

“E-31 will be in Fast Attack mode for rescue”

____________________________________

Old terminology;

“E-31 will be in rescue mode”

fast attack mode examples2
Fast Attack Mode Examples

New terminology;

“E-31 will be in Fast Attack mode for offensive fire attack”

“E-31 will be in Fast Attack mode for ground ladder rescue on side C-Charley”

command mode
Command Mode
  • There is no change to this mode; you will be establishing command and verbalizing the location of your command post.
passing command
Passing Command
  • Historically, we have verbalized “passing command” on the radio prior to another officer arriving at the scene.
  • This terminology no longer exists. We do not “pass command” to somebody who is not at the scene yet.
passing command1
Passing Command
  • If the first-in company officer is in “Fast Attack” mode – It is known that the next-in company officer will establish command upon their arrival.
  • The first-in CO is always in command (whether announced or not) until relieved by another officer.