slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
CSC 3130: Automata theory and formal languages

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 33

CSC 3130: Automata theory and formal languages - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 156 Views
  • Uploaded on

Fall 2008. The Chinese University of Hong Kong. CSC 3130: Automata theory and formal languages. NP-complete problems. Andrej Bogdanov http://www.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/~andrejb/csc3130. Polynomial-time reductions.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'CSC 3130: Automata theory and formal languages' - meena


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Fall 2008

The Chinese University of Hong Kong

CSC 3130: Automata theory and formal languages

NP-complete problems

Andrej Bogdanov

http://www.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/~andrejb/csc3130

polynomial time reductions
Polynomial-time reductions
  • Language Lpolynomial-time reduces to L’ if there exists a polynomial-time computable map R that takes an instance x of L into instance y of L’ s.t.

x ∈ L if and only if y ∈ L’

L

(IS)

L’

(CLIQUE)

R

(G, k)

x

y

(G’, k’)

x ∈ L

y ∈ L’

(G has IS of size k)

(G’ has clique of size k’)

the cook levin theorem
The Cook-Levin Theorem

Every L∈NP reduces to SAT

SAT = {f: f is a satisfiable Boolean formula}

(x1∨x2 ) ∧ (x2∨x3∨x4) ∧ (x1)

(x1∨x2 ) ∧ (x1) ∧ (x2)

f =

f =

is satisfiable

is not satisfiable

x1 = T x2 = Fx3 = T x4 = T

np hardness
NP-hardness
  • Language L is NP-hard if every L’in NP reduces to L
  • Intuitively, NP-hard means “harder than all of NP”
  • The Cook-Levin Theorem says

SAT

NP

SAT is NP-hard

P

np complete
NP-complete
  • L is NP-complete if L is NP-hard and L∈ NP
  • Intuitively, NP-complete means “hardest in NP”
  • Recall that SAT ∈ NP, so SAT is NP-complete

SAT

NP

If SAT∈P, then P = NP

P

proof of cook levin theorem
Proof of Cook-Levin Theorem
  • To prove it, we have to describe a reduction R:

Every L∈NP reduces to SAT

R

w

Boolean formula f

f is satisfiable

w ∈ L

proof of cook levin theorem7
Proof of Cook-Levin Theorem
  • All we know about L: It has a poly-time NTM M
    • Let’s look at computation tableau of M on input w

S

w

M

q0

w1

w2

S-th configuration symbol at time T

T

Since M is nondeterministic,

there may be many possible tableaus

qacc

proof of cook levin theorem8
Proof of Cook-Levin Theorem

S

q0

n = length of input w

w1

w2

height of tableau is p(n)

for some polynomial p

T

u

width is at most p(n)

k possible tableau symbols

qacc

true,

if the (T, S) cell of tableau contains u

1 ≤ S ≤ p(n)

xT, S, u =

1 ≤ T ≤ p(n)

false,

if not

1 ≤ u ≤ k

proof of cook levin theorem9
Proof of Cook-Levin Theorem
  • We will design a formula f such that:

R

w

Boolean formula f

f is satisfiable

w ∈ L

variables of f :

xT, S, u

assignment to xT, S, u

way to fill up the tableau

accepting computation tableau

satisfying assignment

f is satisfiable

M accepts w

proof of cook levin theorem10
Proof of Cook-Levin Theorem
  • We want to construct (in time poly(n)) a formula f :

true,

if the (T, S) cell of tableau contains u

1 ≤ S ≤ p(n)

xT, S, u =

1 ≤ T ≤ p(n)

false,

if not

1 ≤ u ≤ k

true,

if the xs represent a valid accepting tableau

f(x1, 1, 1, ..., xp(n), p(n), k) =

false,

if not

proof of cook levin theorem11
Proof of Cook-Levin Theorem

S

f = fcell ∧ f0 ∧ fmove ∧ facc

q0

w1

w2

T

fcell:

“Every cell contains

exactly one symbol”

u

f0:

“The first row is

q0w1w2...wk☐...☐”

qacc

fmove:

“The moves between rows follow the transitions of M”

facc:

“qacc appears somewhere in the last row”

proof of cook levin theorem12
Proof of Cook-Levin Theorem
  • Desired meaning
  • Implementation:

fcell:

“Every cell contains exactly one symbol”

or: “Exactly one of xS, T, 1 ∨ ... ∨ xS, T, k is true”

fcell = fcell1, 1 ∧ ... ∧ fcellp(n), p(n)

where

fcellT, S = (xT, S, 1 ∨ ... ∨ xT, S, k)

∧ (xT, S, 1 ∨ xT, S, 2)

∧ (xT, S, 1 ∨ xT, S, 3)

∧ ... ∧ (xT, S, k-1 ∨ xT, S, k)

at least one symbol

no two symbols

proof of cook levin theorem13
Proof of Cook-Levin Theorem
  • Desired meaning
  • Implementation:

f0:

“The first row is q0w1w2...wk☐...☐”

facc:

“qacc appears somewhere in the last row”

f0 =

x1, 1, q0 ∧ x1, 1, w1 ∧ x1, 1, w2 ∧ ... ∧ x1, p(n),☐

facc =

xp(n), 1, qacc ∨ xp(n), 2, qacc ∨ ... ∨ xp(n), p(n), qacc

valid and invalid windows
Valid and invalid windows

… 6q3t0u0 …

… 0k6t0q0 …0

… 6t3t0u0 …

… 0t6t0u0…0

invalid window

valid window

… 6c3a0t0 …

… 0c6a0p0…0

… 6t3q3u0 …

… 0t6a0q7 …0

invalid window

valid if d(q3, u) = (q7, a, R)

… 6t3t0u0 …

… 0t6t0q3 …0

… 6c3a0t0 …

… 0b6a0t0…0

valid window

valid window

proof of cook levin theorem15
Proof of Cook-Levin Theorem
  • Desired meaning
  • Implementation:

q0

b

a

a

q3

b

a

b

fmove:

“The moves between rows follow transitions of M”

c

q7

b

b

fmove2, 2

qacc

fmove = fmove1, 1 ∧ ... ∧ fmovep(n)-3, p(n)-3

fmoveT, S =

(xT, S, a1 ∧ xT, S+1, a2 ∧ xT, S+2, a3

∧ xT+1, S, a4 ∧ xT+1, S+1, a5 ∧ xT+2, S+1, a6)

over all

valid windows

a1

a2

a3

a4

a5

a6

other np complete problems
Other NP-complete problems

CLIQUE = {(G, k): G is a graph with a clique of k vertices}

IS = {(G, k): G is a graph with an independent set of k vertices}

VC = {(G, k): G is a graph with a vertex cover of k vertices}

CLIQUE, IS and VC are NP-complete

CLIQUE

IS

VC

SAT

NP

proving np hardness
Proving NP-hardness
  • To show L is NP-hard, it is enough to reduce from some L’ we already know is NP-hard
    • For now we can take L’= SAT
  • To show L is NP-complete, we also need to argue that L is in NP
    • This is usually the easy part

roadmap:

CLIQUE

VC

IS

3SAT

SAT

slide18
3SAT

SAT = {f: f is a satisfiable Boolean formula}

3SAT = {f: f is a satisfiable Boolean formula in conjunctive normal form with at most 3 distinct literals per clause}

(x2∨(x1∧x2 ))∧(x1∧(x1∨x2 ))

literal: xi or xi

gates

CNF: AND of ORs of literals

(x1∨x2 ) ∧ (x2∨x3∨x4) ∧ (x1)

(conjunctive normal form)

clause

literals

3CNF: CNF with ≤3 lit/clause

np hardness of 3sat
NP-hardness of 3SAT
  • Theorem
  • Proof: We describe a reduction R from SAT

3SAT is NP-hard

R

Boolean formula f

3CNF formula f’

f’ is satisfiable

f is satisfiable

reducing sat to 3sat
Reducing SAT to 3SAT
  • Example: f =

(x2∨(x1∧x2 ))∧(x1∧(x1∨x2 ))

x4x5 x7

x7 = x4 ∧ x5

x10

T T T TT T F FT F T FT F F TF T T FF T F TF F T FF F F T

AND

(x4∨x5∨x7)

x8

x9

(x4∨x5∨x7)

OR

NOT

x6

x7

(x4∨x5∨x7)

AND

AND

(x4∨x5∨x7)

x4

x5

x3

NOT

NOT

OR

(x4∨x5∨x7)

∧(x4∨x5∨x7)

x2

x1

x2

x1

x1

x2

∧(x4∨x5∨x7)

∧(x4∨x5∨x7)

We give extra variables to every gate (“wire”)

reducing sat to 3sat21
Reducing SAT to 3SAT
  • Step 1: Add variable xn+j for each gate Gj in f
  • Step 2: Write 3CNF fj for each gate Gj, j = {1, ..., t}
  • Step 3: Output

R

Boolean formula f

3CNF formula f’

requires thatoutput of f is true

f’ = fn+1 ∧ fn+2 ∧ ... ∧ ft ∧ xn+t

reducing sat to 3sat22
Reducing SAT to 3SAT
  • Every satisfying assignment of f extends uniquely to a satisfying assignment of f’
  • Conversely, every satisfying assignment of f’ must contain a satisfying assignment of f

R

Boolean formula f

3CNF formula f’

f’ is satisfiable

f is satisfiable

independent set
Independent set
  • Theorem

IS = {(G, k): G is a graph with an independent set of k vertices}

IS is NP-hard

CLIQUE

VC

An independent set is a subset of vertices so that no pair is connected

2

1

IS

3SAT

{1, 2}, {1, 3}, {4} are independent sets

SAT

4

3

reducing 3sat to is
Reducing 3SAT to IS
  • Proof: We describe a reduction from 3SAT to IS

3SAT = {f: f is a satisfiable Boolean formula in 3CNF}

IS = {(G, k): G is a graph with an independent set of k vertices}

R

3CNF formula f

(G, k)

G has an independentset of size k

f is satisfiable

reducing 3sat to is25
Reducing 3SAT to IS
  • Example: f =

(x1∨x2 ) ∧ (x2∨x3∨x4) ∧ (x1)

x2x3x4

x1x2

TTT

all interconnected

TTF

TT

x1

TFT

T

TF

TFF

FTT

F

FT

etc.

FTF

FF

FFT

FFF

Put an edge for every inconsistency

reducing 3sat to is26
Reducing 3SAT to IS
  • Example: f =

(x1∨x2 ) ∧ (x2∨x3∨x4) ∧ (x1)

x2x3x4

satisfying assignment of f

x1x2

TTT

TTF

TT

IS of size 3 in G

TFT

x1

TF

TFF

T

x1 = T x2 = Fx3 = T x4 = T

FTT

any IS of size 3 in G

FF

FFT

G

FFF

satisfying assignment of f

edges = inconsistencies

reducing 3sat to is27
Reducing 3SAT to IS
  • G has a vertex for every clause Ci of f and every satisfying assignment of Ci
  • G has an edge between any two vertices that represent inconsistent assignments
  • k is the number of clauses in f

R

3CNF formula f

(G, k)

reducing 3sat to is28
Reducing 3SAT to IS
  • Every satisfying assignment of f gives an independent set of size k in G
  • Conversely, from every IS of size k in G we can “extract” a consistent and satisfying assignment of f

R

3CNF formula f

(G, k)

f is satisfiable

G has an IS of size k

vertex cover
Vertex cover
  • Theorem

VC = {(G, k): G is a graph with a vertex cover of size k}

VC is NP-hard

CLIQUE

VC

A vertex cover is a set of vertices that touches (covers) all edges

2

1

IS

3SAT

{2, 4}, {3, 4}, {1, 2, 3}

are vertex covers

SAT

4

3

reducing is to vc
Reducing IS to VC
  • Proof: We describe a reduction from IS to VC
  • Example

R

(G, k)

(G’, k’)

G has an IS of size k

G’ has a VC of size k’

2

1

vertex covers

independent sets

{2, 4}, {3, 4},

{1, 2, 3}, {1, 2, 4},

{1, 3, 4}, {2, 3, 4},

{1, 2, 3, 4}

∅, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4},

{1, 3}, {2, 3}

4

3

reducing is to vc31
Reducing IS to VC
  • Claim
  • Proof

S is an independent set of G if and only if S is a vertex cover of G

S is an independent set of G

no edge has both endpoints in S

every edge has an endpoint in S

S is a vertex cover of G

reducing is to vc32
Reducing IS to VC
  • Set G’ = G, k’ = n – k (n = number of vertices)by previous Claim.

R

(G, k)

(G’, k’)

G has an IS of size k

G’ has a VC of size k’

the ubiquity of np complete problems
The ubiquity of NP-complete problems
  • We saw a few examples of NP-complete problems, but there are many more
  • A surprising fact of life is that most CS problems are either in P or NP-complete
  • A 1979 book by Garey and Johnsonlists 100+ NP-complete problems
ad