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David Walker - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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David Walker
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  1. David Walker In the late 1800s, the movement to end slavery became stronger than ever. David Walker, while not a slave himself, wrote a pamphlet titled David Walker’s Appeal that called for slaves to revolt. Even though many banned this pamphlet from circulating, it still caused a stir amongst slaves and abolitionists. Besides writing this pamphlet, how else did Walker influence America?

  2. Some people in America had always been against slavery. In the 1800s, however, the movement to end slavery became stronger than ever before. David Walker’s Appeal had a big influence on that movement. Although he was born a freeman, David Walker saw slavery first-hand during his childhood. Those experiences inspired him to write the Appeal, a long pamphlet which called for slaves to revolt (violently, if necessary) against their slave masters. The Appeal was banned in many parts of the country. Some people were even arrested for owning it. Despite its controversy, the pamphlet influenced many abolitionists and brought national attention to the cause of ending slavery. Walker, D. (1829). David Walker's Appeal in Four Articles, together with a Preamble, to the Coloured Citizens of the World . . . (September 1829). (Image 2). Library of Congress: American Memory, African American Odyssey.

  3. In his writing, Walker contrasted the system of slavery with the ideals that helped create America. His argument that slavery violated America ’s celebrated belief in liberty was used by many abolitionists. Walker, D. (1829). David Walker's Appeal in Four Articles, together with a Preamble, to the Coloured Citizens of the World . . . (September 1829). (Image 5). Library of Congress: American Memory, African American Odyssey.

  4. This is an example of the types of materials abolitionists used to promote their cause. It combines powerful, controversial images with a descriptive text. In this case, the text is an anti-slavery poem by John Greenleaf Whittier. American Anti-Slavery Society & Anti-Slavery Office (New York). (1837). Am I not a man and a brother?. Library of Congress: Prints & Photographs, Cartoon Prints, American .

  5. David Walker’s Appeal called for immediate revolt. This passionate plea for change affected the next forty years of the abolitionist movement. One person influenced by David Walker’s call for rebellion was Nat Turner, a slave who led a violent revolt against slave owners in Virginia . Gray, T. (1832). The Confessions of Nat Turner, the Leader of the Late Insurrection in Southampton, Virginia . . . . . Library of Congress: Exhibitions, The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship.