Turning around 1 000 schools the story of success for all
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Turning Around 1,000 Schools: The Story of Success for All. Kristin Anderson Moore Lecture Child Trends Robert E. Slavin Johns Hopkins University. The Goal . Create whole-school reform approach for high-poverty elementary and middle schools that is: Effective Comprehensive Replicable

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Turning around 1 000 schools the story of success for all

Turning Around 1,000 Schools:The Story of Success for All

Kristin Anderson Moore Lecture

Child Trends

Robert E. Slavin

Johns Hopkins University


The goal
The Goal

  • Create whole-school reform approach for high-poverty elementary and middle schools that is:

    • Effective

    • Comprehensive

    • Replicable

    • Exciting for kids

    • Accepted by teachers


Professional development approach in success for all
Professional Development Approach in Success for All

  • Extensive professional development and coaching in:

    • Cooperative learning

    • Phonics

    • Comprehension strategies

    • Vocabulary

    • Classroom management


Structural elements of success for all
Structural Elements of Success for All

  • Supportive materials, software

  • Regrouping

  • School-wide progress monitoring and goal-setting

  • Tutoring (now computer-assisted)

  • Facilitator

  • Embedded multimedia

  • Schools vote to adopt


Solutions team
Solutions Team

  • Family support

  • Integrated services

  • Behavior, attendance, cooperation, conflict resolution

  • Social-emotional development


Current status of success for all
Current Status of Success for All

  • 1000 schools in 47 states

  • Average school in program 10 years

  • About 80% free lunch, Title I schoolwide projects

  • National network of 120 trainers, total of220 staff

  • Recently received $50 million i3 grant


Research on success for all
Research on Success for All

  • 35-school randomized evaluation

  • 120-school University of Michigan study

  • Many smaller matched studies

  • Positive effects on reading maintained to 8th grade

  • Reductions in special ed, retentions

  • Only whole-school program to meet standards of Social Programs That Work


Precursors of success for all
Precursors of Success for All

  • 1970-1972: Walking in the rain, WorldLab

  • 1975-1980: Basic cooperative learning research

  • 1980-1983: TAI Math

  • 1983-1985: CIRC Reading

  • 1985-1987: Cooperative Elementary School; Reviews of research

  • 1985-1987: Invitation from Baltimore to create SFA


Early development research and scale up
Early Development, Research, and Scale-Up

  • 1987-1991: Initial implementations: Baltimore, Philadelphia

  • 1991-1996: New American Schools grants

  • 1997 Spin-off from Johns Hopkins University, founding of Success for All Foundation


Scale up issues in the 1990 s
Scale-Up Issues in the 1990’s

  • Problem: Maintaining quality in a time of rapid growth

  • Added 50% to network each year

  • Experimented with partnerships

  • Capital problems

  • Hiring problems


Disaster reading first
Disaster: Reading First

  • Success for All not supported by Bush administration

  • Problems with Reading First

  • Result: Rapid drop-off, 60% cut in staff, financial problems


Stabilization and innovation in the 2000 s
Stabilization and Innovation in the 2000’s

  • Substantial refinements to model:

    • Computerized monitoring

    • Solutions Team

    • Embedded multimedia

    • Interactive whiteboards

    • Improved middle school, high school

    • Math programs

    • Writing program

    • Leadership programs

    • Social-emotional learning and cognitive regulation


Investing in innovation i3
Investing in Innovation (i3)

  • Goal: 1100 additional schools over 5 years

    • Partnerships with districts, states

    • Grants to Title I schoolwide projects

    • Building capacity

    • MDRC evaluation


What have we learned i coaching
What Have We Learned? I. Coaching

  • Build national coaching capacity rather than relying on partners

  • Provide adequate coaching and monitor quality

  • Be explicit but adapt to local needs

  • Obtain informed buy-in from teachers

  • Use school-based facilitators


What have we learned ii operations
What Have We Learned:II. Operations

  • Stay non-profit

  • Obtain adequate capital

  • Avoid depending on grants for ongoing operations


Implications for policy
Implications for Policy

  • SFA demonstrates that reform can happen in ordinary Title I schools at scale

  • Fund and encourage promising programs

  • Insist on rigorous evaluations

  • Help with expertise, capital

  • Provide grants to schools to adopt proven programs

  • Proactively disseminates information on proven approaches, effective methods fairs


Vision for the future
Vision for the Future

  • All Title I schools should have opportunity to choose among proven programs

  • Constant process of development, evaluation, and scale-up of promising approaches

  • Results: Progressive, irreversible improvement in outcomes for vulnerable children


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