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School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: What Is IT?. George Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Center for Behavioral Education & Research University of Connecticut August 7, 2007 www.pbis.org www.swis.org George.sugai@uconn.edu. Purpose. Provide overview of SWPBS “Big Ideas” or concepts

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school wide positive behavior support what is it

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support:What Is IT?

George Sugai

OSEP Center on PBIS

Center for Behavioral Education & Research

University of Connecticut

August 7, 2007

www.pbis.org

www.swis.org

George.sugai@uconn.edu

purpose
Purpose

Provide overview of SWPBS

  • “Big Ideas” or concepts
  • Examples & data
slide3

4 Questions

  • Why PBIS or SWPBS?
  • What is SWPBS?
  • What does SWPBS look like?
  • What SWPBS outcomes?
slide5

Forum for Change

October 11-12 Rosemont, IL

slide9
TOP FOUR 2005

Lack of financial support (since 2000)

Overcrowded schools

Lack of discipline & control

Drug use

#1 SPOT

>2000 lack of financial support

1991-2000 drug use

<1991 lack of discipline

Rose, L. C., & Gallup. A. M. (2005). 37th annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup poll of the public’s attitudes toward the public schools. Kappan, September, 41-59.

slide10

State & Federal Initiatives

NCLB

RtI

IDEA

Safe Schools

slide11

Evidence Base

Special Education

Mental Health

School Psychology

Psychology

2001 surgeon general s report on youth violence recommendations
2001 Surgeon General’s Report on Youth Violence: Recommendations
  • Change social context to break up antisocial networks
  • Improve parent effectiveness
  • Increase academic success
  • Create positive school climates
  • Teach & encourage individual skills & competence
lessons learned white house conference on school safety
Lessons Learned: White House Conference on School Safety
  • Students, staff, & community must have means of communicating that is immediate, safe, & reliable
  • Positive, respectful, predictable, & trusting student-teacher-family relationships are important
  • High rates of academic & social success are important
  • Positive, respectful, predictable, & trusting school environment/climate is important for all students
  • Metal detectors, surveillance cameras, & security guards are insufficient deterents
slide14

School-based Prevention & Youth Development ProgrammingCoordinated Social Emotional & Academic Learning Greenberg et al. (2003) American Psychologist

  • Teach children social skills directly in real context
  • “Foster respectful, supportive relations among students, school staff, & parents”
  • Support & reinforce positive academic & social behavior through comprehensive systems
  • Invest in multiyear, multicomponent programs
  • Combine classroom & school- & community-wide efforts
  • Precorrect & continue prevention efforts
slide15

http://rtckids.fmhi.usf.eduKutash, K., Duchnowski, A. J., & Lynn, N. (2006). School-based mental health: An empirical guide for decision makers.Tampa, FL: University of South Florida. Louis De la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, Department of Child & Family Studies, Research & Training Center for Children’s Mental Health.http://cfs.fmhi.usf.eduDuchnowski, A. J., Kutash, K., & Romney, S., (2006). Voices from the field: A blueprint for schools to increase involvement of families who have children with emotional disturbances. Tamp, FL: University of South Florida, The Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, Department of Child and Family Studies.

characteristics of safe school center for study prevention of youth violence
Characteristics of Safe School Center for Study & Prevention of Youth Violence
  • High academic expectations & performance
  • High levels of parental & community involvement
  • Effective leadership by administrators & teachers
  • A few clearly understood & uniformly enforced, rules
  • Social skills instruction, character education & good citizenship.
  • After school – extended day programs
sw pbs logic
SW-PBS Logic!

Successful individual student behavior support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, & durable

(Zins & Ponti, 1990)

slide19

Supporting Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

4 PBS Elements

OUTCOMES

Supporting

Decision

Making

Supporting

Staff Behavior

DATA

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student Behavior

swpbs achievement
SWPBS & Achievement

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Good Teaching

Behavior Management

Increasing District & State Competency &Capacity

Investing in Outcomes, Data, Practices, &Systems

slide22

Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

CONTINUUM OF

SCHOOL-WIDE

INSTRUCTIONAL &

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR

SUPPORT

~5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

~15%

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

~80% of Students

general implementation process getting started

Team

GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started”

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

general implementation process

Team

GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

slide25

3-4 Year

Commitment

Top 3 School-

Wide

Initiatives

3-Tiered

Prevention

Logic

Agreements &

Supports

Coaching &

Facilitation

Administrative

Participation

Dedicated

Resources

& Time

general implementation process26

Team

GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

office discipline referrals
Office Discipline Referrals
  • Definition
    • Kid-Teacher-Administrator interaction
    • Underestimation of actual behavior
  • Improving usefulness & value
    • Clear, mutually exclusive, exhaustive definitions
    • Distinction between office v. classroom managed
    • Continuum of behavior support
    • Positive school-wide foundations
    • W/in school comparisons
slide34

School-wide Positive

Behavior Support

Systems

Classroom

Setting Systems

Nonclassroom

Setting Systems

Individual Student

Systems

School-wide

Systems

slide35

Classroom

Setting Systems

  • Classroom-wide positive expectations taught & encouraged
  • Teaching classroom routines & cuestaught & encouraged
  • Ratio of 6-8 positive to 1 negative adult-student interaction
  • Active supervision
  • Redirections for minor, infrequent behavior errors
  • Frequent precorrections for chronic errors
  • Effective academic instruction & curriculum
slide36

Nonclassroom

Setting Systems

  • Positive expectations & routines taught & encouraged
  • Active supervision by all staff
    • Scan, move, interact
  • Precorrections & reminders
  • Positive reinforcement
slide37

Individual Student

Systems

  • Behavioral competence at school & district levels
  • Function-based behavior support planning
  • Team- & data-based decision making
  • Comprehensive person-centered planning & wraparound processes
  • Targeted social skills & self-management instruction
  • Individualized instructional & curricular accommodations
slide38

School-wide Systems

1. Common purpose & approach to discipline

2. Clear set of positive expectations & behaviors

3. Procedures for teaching expected behavior

4. Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior

5. Continuum of procedures for discouraging inappropriate behavior

6. Procedures for on-going monitoring & evaluation

teaching matrix activity
Teaching Matrix Activity

Classroom

Lunchroom

Bus

Hallway

Assembly

Respect Others

  • Use inside voice
  • ________
  • Eat your own food
  • __________
  • Stay in your seat
  • _________
  • Stay to right
  • _________
  • Arrive on time to speaker
  • __________

Respect Environment & Property

  • Recycle paper
  • _________
  • Return trays
  • __________
  • Keep feet on floor
  • __________
  • Put trash in cans
  • _________
  • Take litter with you
  • __________

Respect Yourself

  • Do your best
  • __________
  • Wash your hands
  • __________
  • Be at stop on time
  • __________
  • Use your words
  • __________
  • Listen to speaker
  • __________

Respect Learning

  • Have materials ready
  • __________
  • Eat balanced diet
  • __________
  • Go directly from bus to class
  • __________
  • Go directly to class
  • __________
  • Discuss topic in class w/ others
  • __________
slide45

RRespectTo show consideration, appreciation, and acceptance

• Respect yourself• Respect others• Demonstrate appropriate language and behavior

IIntegrityAdherence to an agreed upon code of behavior

• Be responsible• Do your own work• Be trustworthy and trust others

DDisciplineManaging ones self to achieve goals and meet expectations

• Strive for consistency• Attend class daily; be on time• Meet deadlines; do your homework

PPerseveranceHolding to a course of action despite obstacles

• Stay positive• Set goals• Learn from mistakes

EExcellenceBeing of finest or highest quality

• Do your personal best• Exceed minimum expectations• Inspire excellence in others

NEHS website, Oct. 26, 2004

are rewards dangerous
Are “Rewards” Dangerous?

“…our research team has conducted a series of reviews and analysis of (the reward) literature; our conclusion is that there is no inherent negative property of reward. Our analyses indicate that the argument against the use of rewards is an overgeneralization based on a narrow set of circumstances.”

  • Cameron, 2002
    • Cameron & Pierce, 1994, 2002
    • Cameron, Banko & Pierce, 2001
reinforcement wisdom
Reinforcement Wisdom!
  • “Knowing” or saying “know” does NOT mean “will do”
  • Students “do more” when “doing works”…appropriate & inappropriate!
  • Natural consequences are varied, unpredictable, undependable,…not always preventive
  • Err on side of being positive
general implementation process49

Team

GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

general implementation process50

Team

GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

slide53

Pre

Post

odr admin benefit springfield ms md
ODR Admin. BenefitSpringfield MS, MD

2001-2002 2277

2002-2003 1322

= 955 42% improvement

= 14,325 min. @15 min.

= 238.75 hrs

= 40 days Admin. time

odr instruc benefit springfield ms md
ODR Instruc. BenefitSpringfield MS, MD

2001-2002 2277

2002-2003 1322

= 955 42% improvement

= 42,975 min. @ 45 min.

= 716.25 hrs

= 119 days Instruc. time

slide56

4 Questions

  • Why PBIS or SWPBS?
  • What is SWPBS?
  • What does SWPBS look like?
  • What SWPBS outcomes?
pbis messages
PBIS Messages
  • Measurable & justifiable outcomes
  • On-going data-based decision making
  • Evidence-based practices
  • Systems ensuring durable, high fidelity of implementation
organizational goals
Organizational Goals

Common Vision

ORGANIZATION MEMBERS

Common Experience

Common Language

slide59
CONTACT INFO

George.sugai@uconn.edu

Robh@uoregon.edu

www.pbis.org