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Roots of Democracy in America. Magna Carta. 1. 1215 English noblemen forced King John to sign Two basic ideas: Even a king must obey law Citizens have certain rights. Copy of the Magna Carta from 1225. Virginia House of Burgesses. 2. 1619

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magna carta
Magna Carta

1

  • 1215
  • English noblemen forced King John to sign
  • Two basic ideas:
    • Even a king must obey law
    • Citizens have certain rights
virginia house of burgesses
Virginia House of Burgesses

2

  • 1619
  • First elected representative assembly in the colonies
mayflower compact
Mayflower Compact

3

  • Compact means agreement or contract
  • 1620 - Signed by the Pilgrims before they disembarked from the ship
  • They would elect men to govern Plymouth Plantation by majority vote
  • First attempt to practice democracyin American history
english bill of rights
English Bill of Rights

4

  • 1689
  • Signed by the English monarchs, William and Mary
  • Gave English Parliament ultimate power
  • Listed the rights of English citizens
fundamental orders of connecticut
Fundamental Orders of Connecticut

5

First written constitution in American colonial history

john locke
John Locke

6

  • 1690
  • English philosopher
  • “Natural Rights of Man”
    • Life
    • Liberty
    • Private property
slide13

John Locke

British Philosopher

declaration of independence

7

Declaration of Independence
  • 1776
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • “Unalienable Rights”
  • Argues that governments are created to protect man’s rights
  • People should abolish any government that does not
u s constitution
U.S. Constitution

8

  • 1787
  • Current written plan that describes the basic power structure and function of the federal government
federalists

9

Federalists
  • Leaders who wanted a strong federal (central) government.
  • Supported the Constitution as it was written in 1787.
  • James Madison (4th Pres.)– “Father of the Constitution.”
  • Alexander Hamilton – First Secretary of the Treasury.

.

federalists1
Federalists

James Madison

Alexander Hamilton

anti federalists

10

Anti-federalists
  • Leaders who opposed a strong federal government
  • Refused to ratify the 1787 Constitution until a “Bill of Rights” was added to protect citizens
federalist papers

11

Federalist Papers

A series of essays written by the Federalists to convince Americans to support the Constitution and a stronger national government

bill of rights

12

Bill of Rights
  • First 10 amendments to the Constitution.
  • Lists the rights of American citizens.
amendment i

13

Amendment I

Freedom of speech, press, religion, assembly and petition

amendment ii

Amendment II

14

Amendment II

Right to bear arms

amendment iii

Amendment III

15

Amendment III

Prevents quartering of soldiers in citizens’ homes.

amendment iv

Amendment IV

16

Amendment IV

Prevents illegal searches and seizures of property

amendment v

Amendment V

17

Amendment V

Protects rights of the accused, such as no self-incrimination in court and no double jeopardy.

amendment vi

Amendment VI

18

Amendment VI

Right to a speedy trial by jury of your peers in criminal cases. (murder)

amendment vii

Amendment VII

19

Amendment VII

Right to a jury trial in civil cases (lawsuits).

amendment viii

Amendment VIII

20

Amendment VIII

Prevents excessive bail and cruel and unusual punishments.

amendment ix

Amendment IX

21

Amendment IX
  • Rights reserved for the people.
  • Just because it isn’t specifically listed in the Bill of Rights does not mean you do not have a certain right.
  • Example: the right to privacy.
amendment x

Amendment X

22

Amendment X
  • States’ Rights
  • If a power is not specifically granted to the national government, it is reserved for the states.
  • Example: public schools
slide31

Seven Principles

of the Constitution

slide32

Popular Sovereignty

  • The people give government its power.
  • Government exists to serve the people.
  • Example: voting

23

slide34

Limited Government

  • No one is above the law.
  • Citizens and government officials must all follow the laws.

24

slide35

Individual Rights

  • Personal rights and freedoms guaranteed in the Bill of Rights
  • First 10 Amendments
  • Examples: speech, religion, arms, speedy trial by jury

25

slide36

You are protected under

the Bill of Rights umbrella

slide37

Republicanism

We believe in electing officials to represent our interests and make the laws for us.

Example: the U.S. Congress.

26

slide38

Separation of Powers

  • Our federal government is divided into 3 separate branches.
  • Each branch has its own separate and specific duties and responsibilities.

27

continued

slide40

Checks and Balances

  • Each branch can block the power of the other 2 branches.
  • Prevents 1 branch from becoming too powerful.
  • Examples: Presidential veto; Judicial review; Congressional approval of justices.

28

slide42

Federalism

  • The federal and state governments share some powers
  • Examples:
    • We pay federal income tax, and some states require a state income tax.
    • Both the federal and state governments build highways.

29

slide43

Federalism

Federal Laws

State Laws