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Potato Power. The Everlasting Relationship Between Ireland and the Potato Presented by Allison and Sara. What You Will Learn. The importance of the potato to Ireland Food differences between the rich and poor Proper potato growth.

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potato power

Potato Power

The Everlasting Relationship Between Ireland and the Potato

Presented by Allison and Sara

what you will learn
What You Will Learn
  • The importance of the potato to Ireland
  • Food differences between the rich and poor
  • Proper potato growth
the nh curriculum guidelines that will be met in this presentation include
The NH curriculum guidelines that will be met in this presentation include:
  • The NH curriculum guidelines that will be met in this presentation include:
  • Nutrition:
  • 5. Food safety Students need to know:
  • 5.1 Importance of Cleanliness
  • 5.2 Safe Food Preparation, Serving and Storage
  • 3.Influences on Food Choice:
  • 3.4 Cultural Influences
  • 2. Environmental Health and Resource Conservation:
  • 2.4 Interrelationship of the Health of a Community and the Global Environment
  • 2.6 Effects of the Environment on the Food Chain
ireland and the potato
Ireland and the Potato
  • Arrived in Europe from South America in 1570
  • When potato arrived the population in Ireland was 1 million, by the year 1840 the population had grown to around 8 million
  • It produced a large bounty that could be stored and eaten throughout winter months
  • The potato was the main staple and was what the poor primarily ate
  • A poor farmer could grow the potatoes his family needed on just half an acre of land
  • It is estimated that the average family of four, two adults and two children, ate on average 5 lbs. of potatoes a day or 5 tons a year
what s in a potato
What’s in a Potato?
  • Calories/ Energy
  • Mostly Carbohydrates
  • Some Protein
  • Little to No Fat
  • Some Vitamins
  • Some Minerals

Source: www.gardening.ktsa.com

what the poor ate

Most Common meal compliments to the potato

    • Herring (protein)
    • Milk (with potato for a dairy and milk source)
  • Less common foods
    • Rabbit
    • Bird
    • Nuts
    • Berries
    • Wild mushrooms
    • Not a lot of varied eating
What the Poor Ate
  • Most Common meal compliments to the potato
    • Herring (protein)
    • Milk (with potato for a dairy source)
  • Less Common foods
    • Rabbit
    • Bird
    • Nuts
    • Berries
    • Wild mushrooms
    • Not a lot of varied eating

Source: www.thefishsociety.co.uk

what the rich ate

Most common meal compliments to the potato

    • Cultivated vegetables
    • Pork
    • Mutton
    • Potato with cabbage- Colcannon
    • Potato with meat and vegetables for an Irish stew
    • Black pudding (ox blood and oatmeal)
  • Less Common
    • Eating a variety of foods
    • Add spices, herbs
What the Rich Ate
  • Most common meal compliments to the potato
    • Cultivated vegetables
    • Pork
    • Mutton
    • Colcannon-potato with cabbage
    • Irish stew- potatoes with meat and vegetables
    • Black pudding- ox blood and oatmeal
  • Less common
    • Spices, herbs
    • Eating a variety

Source: www.laverstokepark.co.uk

growth of a potato
Growth of a Potato

Source : SustenibilidadIndigena blog

growth of a potato1
Growth of a Potato

Source: Irish Eyes-Garden City Seeds

potato planting
Potato Planting

Potatoes thrive in a loose, well-drained, slightly acidic soil (pH 5 - 6)

Plant only certified potato tubers, with a bud (eyes) called seeds

Seed potatoes should be about the size of an egg with at least one eye

Soil pieces are planted only 4 inches below soil surface, rows 36 inches apart and plants 6 inches aparts

  • Potatoes thrive in loose, well-drained slightly acid soil (pH 5-6)
  • Plant only certified potato tubers with a bud (eye) called seeds
  • Seed potatoes should be about size of an egg with at least one eye
  • Seed pieces planted only 4 inches below soil surface, rows 36 inches apart, and plants 6 inches apart

Source:Blogthefarm.wordpress.com

growth cycle
Growth Cycle
  • Sprout development. The eyes of the potato grow sprouts, which then break through the topsoil.
  • Vegetative growth. The leaves, stems, and root system develop, photosynthesis begins, and the plant begins to store nutrients in tubers.
  • Tuber initiation. Tubers begin forming the underground stems called stolons, generally before the plant flowers.
  • Tuber bulking. Tubers grow larger as the sugars and starches accumulate.
  • Maturation. The tubers reach full size. The top of the plant wilts and dies. During maturation, the tuber skin toughens, which enhances storage life.
  • Only plant certified seeds
food demo
Food Demo
  • WASH YOUR HANDS!
  • Read recipe carefully, see what you need
  • Prepare ingredients safely
  • Follow directions/methods in order

Source:www.tarasmulticulturaltable.com

colcannon cooking
Colcannon Cooking

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 25 minutes

Yield: Serves 4 as a side dish.

For a variation, sub out half of the potatoes with parsnips. Can add chives, leeks, or bacon too.

INGREDIENTS

4 russet potatoes (2 to 2 1/2 pounds), peeled and cut into large chunks

Salt

5-6 Tbsp unsalted butter (with more butter for serving)

3 lightly packed cups of chopped kale, cabbage, chard, or other leafy green

3 green onions (including the green onion greens), minced (about 1/2 cup)

1 cup milk or cream

METHOD

1 Put the potatoes in a medium pot and cover with cold water by at least an inch. Add 2 tablespoons of salt, and bring to a boil. Boil until the potatoes are fork tender (15 to 20 minutes). Drain in a colander.

2 Return the pot to the stove and set over medium-high heat. Melt the butter in the pot and once it's hot, add the greens. Cook the greens for 3-4 minutes, or until they are wilted and have given off some of their water. Add the green onions and cook 1 minute more.

3 Pour in the milk or cream, mix well, and add the potatoes. Reduce the heat to medium. Use a fork or potato masher and mash the potatoes, mixing them up with the greens. Add salt to taste and serve hot, with a knob of butter in the center. Adapted from simplyrecipes.com

sources
Sources
  • http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/colcannon/
  • http://www.dochara.com
  • http://solutionsforyourlife.ufl.edu/
  • http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/irish_potato_famine.cfm