Please go to Betsy’s table to pick up your new book! - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Please go to Betsy’s table to pick up your new book!

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  1. Please go to Betsy’s table to pick up your new book! • If you were out last month, the handouts are on the circular table in front of Betsy. • If you signed the sheet that you are missing materials, they are on the table under the screen on the high school side. • While you are eating breakfast, please look over the “Rigor on Trial” debrief on the back of your agenda.

  2. JANUARY GRREC MATH NETWORKJanuary 24, 2012

  3. GRREC Math Facilitation Team

  4. Norms • Be present and engaged in our work. • We are equal partners. • Seek first to understand and then to be understood. • Stay positive. • Respect ideas of others. • One voice rule – no private conversations. • Be productive. • Be flexible and willing to change.

  5. October Road Map

  6. November Road Map

  7. Targets 1. Participants can create Parallel Tasks in order to differentiate for students. 2.Participants can provide effective oral and written feedback to students, in order to move their learning forward.

  8. Targets 3. Participants will deepen their understanding of implementing a FAL by creating a lesson that embeds the Key Strategies of Formative Assessment. 4. Participants can select appropriate formative assessment strategies to positively impact student learning.

  9. Targets 5. Participants will deepen their understanding of number, operations, algebraic thinking and mathematics pedagogy.

  10. Target Participants can create Parallel Tasks in order to differentiate for students.

  11. PARALLEL TASKS

  12. Parallel Tasks 1stTurn/Last Turn Elementary– Good Questions book: pg. 10-14 Middle/High – More Good Questions book: pg. 11-16 • At your table, each member silently reads the section on Parallel Tasks • Highlight items that have particular meaning to you. • Person with birthday closest to Christmas will go first and read one of their items highlighted but will not comment on it. • In round-robin fashion, group members comment on the first person’s identified item with no cross-talk. • When everyone has commented, the initial person who named the item will share his or her thinking about the item and therefore gets the last turn. • Repeat the pattern around the table. Be prepared to share the main points your group discussed.

  13. Target Participants can provide effective oral and written feedback to students, in order to move their learning forward.

  14. Where Am I Going? Strategy 1: Provide students with a clear and understandable vision of the learning target.

  15. I can provide effective oral and written feedback to students, in order to move their learning forward. 1. Identify word or words needing clarification. 2. Define the word(s). 3. Convert the definition to language your students are likely to understand. Your own definition of feedback: reveal student strengths and weaknesses with respect to the specific expectation(s) of the assignment. Student-friendly definition of feedback: reveal student strengths and weaknesses regarding the specific expectation(s) they are trying to hit in a given assignment.

  16. Learning Target with Success Criteria I can provide effective oral and written feedback to students, in order to move their learning forward. This means I can…. reveal student strengths and weaknesses regarding the specific expectation(s) they are trying to hit in a given assignment.

  17. Using a Rubric to Define the Learning • How would you describe the characteristics of a good solution to a multi-step mathematics problem? • Solve the 5th grade mathematics problem. • After working the problem, what other characteristics of a good solution come to mind?

  18. Using a Rubric to Define the Learning How does our list of characteristics of a good solution compare with the rubric provided focusing on mathematical problem solving?

  19. Where Am I Going? Strategy 2: Using Strong and Weak Examples

  20. Rubric for Problem Solving • Read the rubric • Begin with the “5” level. • Read the “1” level next. • End with the “3” level. • Review the student work labeled ‘Sample 1’ • Is this student work weak or strong based on our rubric? • Note your judgment on the chart. • Refer to the rubric and find phrases that describe the quality of the sample. • Score ‘Sample 1’ • Assign and record a score. • Record the phrases from the rubric that justify the score.

  21. Poll Everywhere

  22. Sample 2 • Review the student work labeled ‘Sample 2’ • Is this student work weak or strong based on our rubric? • Note your judgment on the chart. • Refer to the rubric and find phrases that describe the quality of the sample. • Score ‘Sample 2’ • Assign and record a score. • Record the phrases from the rubric that justify the score.

  23. Poll Everywhere

  24. Where Am I Now? Strategy 3: Offer Regular and Descriptive FEEDBACK

  25. Feedback is not always or even usually successful.

  26. 1/3 of studies – FEEDBACK WORSENSPERFORMANCE • 1/3 of studies – NO DIFFERENCE IN OUTCOMES WITH AND WITHOUT FEEDBACK • ONLY in 1/3 of studies – FEEDBACK CONSISTENTLYIMPROVED PERFORMANCE Kluger & De Nisi’s (1996) meta-analysis on feedback

  27. Feedback Reflection • When do students in your class receive feedback on their progress? • What forms does feedback take in your classroom? • What do you expect students to do with feedback information?

  28. Three-Minute Conference Student Work – Sample 3 • Work with a partner. • Assign an A Partner and a B Partner by deciding who stayed up the latest last night. • PARTNER A – Stayed up the latest • PARTNER B – Went to sleep earliest • Partner A is the student whose work is shown in Sample 3. • Partner B is the teacher.

  29. Three-Minute Conference Student Work – Sample 3 • Using Sample 3 and the Rubric used earlier: • PARTNER A – Fill out the My Opinion section of the Three-Minute Conference Assessment Dialogue Form. • PARTNER B – Analyze the student work according to the Rubric, assign and record a score, and record the phrases from the rubric that justify the score. • Spend the next three minutes discussing what you each recorded. • Partner A, the student, would take notes on what Partner B, the teacher pointed out as strengths and areas to work on and formulating a plan to improve.

  30. Three-Minute Conference • How could you make this work in your classroom? • How could you support students using this strategy to give feedback to each other?

  31. Feedback Checklist • Complete the checklist • Skim Chapter 3 in your new book for homework.

  32. 75 Math FACTS I can select appropriate formative assessment strategies to positively impact student learning.

  33. Morning BREAK

  34. Elementary Target Participants will deepen their understanding of number, operations, algebraic thinking and mathematics pedagogy.

  35. Investigating Addition & SubtractionAnd Multiplication & Division How do you define addition and subtraction? How do you define multiplication and division? How do you introduce these concepts in the classroom? Adapted from GRREC Summer Workshop Tim Sears KDE Math Consultant tim.sears@education.ky.gov

  36. Sorting Cards Activity Divide into 2 teams at each table. Each team will be given a stack of cards. Write a number sentence on each card that represents the problem. Sort the cards into groups that make sense to your team members. Then tape the different groups of cards onto poster paper. Label/Name each group of cards based on how you grouped them.

  37. Addition & Subtraction Structures Van De Walle, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics CHANGE JOIN INITIAL RESULT

  38. Addition & Subtraction Structures Van De Walle, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics CHANGE INITIAL RESULT SEPARATE

  39. Addition & Subtraction Structures Van De Walle, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics Whole PART-PART-WHOLE

  40. Illustrative Mathematics • http://illustrativemathematics.org/

  41. Addition & Subtraction Structures Van De Walle, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics Difference Large Set Small Set COMPARE

  42. Addition & Subtraction Structures Sandra had 8 pennies. George gave her some more. Now Sandra has 12 pennies. How many did George give her? Identify the Initial, Change and Result amounts from this problem. Using counters, model(solve) the problem as you think students might do. How does this connect to your number sentence? Van De Walle, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics Join Problems Cards: A, E, G Result

  43. Addition & Subtraction Structures Sandra had 12 pennies. She gave some to George. How many did she give to George? Identify the Initial, Change and Result amounts from this problem. Using counters, model(solve) the problem as you think students might do. How does this connect to your number sentence? Van De Walle, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics Result Separate Problems Cards: C, I, K

  44. Addition & Subtraction Structures George and Sandra put in 12 pennies into the piggy bank. George put in 4 pennies. How many pennies did Sandra put in? Identify the parts and the whole in the problem. Using counters, model(solve) the problem as you think students might do. How does this connect to your number sentence? Van De Walle, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics Part-Part-Whole Problems Cards: J, H

  45. Addition & Subtraction Structures George has 4 more pennies than Sandra. George has 12 pennies. How many pennies does Sandra have? Identify the large set, small set and difference in the problem. Using counters, model(solve) the problem as you think students might do. How does this connect to your number sentence? Van De Walle, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics Compare Problems Cards: B, D, F

  46. 1.OA.1 Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.2 2See Glossary, Table 1.

  47. Kindergarten OA

  48. CRITICAL Area-Grade 1

  49. Grade 2-OA