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UW Stout CTE 708 Issues in Career & Technical Education October 8, 2010 Presented by: PowerPoint Presentation
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The Influence of High School Career & Technical Education Classes on Post-Secondary Educational Decisions. UW Stout CTE 708 Issues in Career & Technical Education October 8, 2010 Presented by: Betsy Feaster, Molly Will, & Ronald Zillmer. Overview. Introduction Background of the Issue

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    1. The Influence of High SchoolCareer & Technical Education Classeson Post-Secondary Educational Decisions UW Stout CTE 708 Issues in Career & Technical Education October 8, 2010 Presented by: Betsy Feaster, Molly Will, & Ronald Zillmer

    2. Overview • Introduction • Background of the Issue • Background of Career & Technical Education • What is a Traditional High School? • What is a Charter School? • Impact on Career and Technical Education • Data Collection and Analysis • Strategies to Solve the Issue • Conclusions and Further Issues for Consideration

    3. Do Career and Technical Education Classes in Traditional High Schools or Charter Schools Influence the Post-Secondary Educational Path?

    4. Background Information

    5. Career and Technical Education • Develops knowledge needed to attain post-secondary education. • Provides a high level of education • Offers education to fit everyone’s needs

    6. Traditional Secondary Public High School vs. Charter School High school is no longer defined as one building with one way of offering an education. Students wants and demands for an education to fit their needs has become very prevalent. "Secondary education institutions and current schooling practices need to align with the demands of a globalized and technology-driven world." (World Bank Secondary Education)

    7. Traditional Secondary Public High School Education • Traditional High School According to the US Journal of Academics website (2010) high school is characterized as, "Academic programs specifically designed for students between the ages of 12 and 17 years old, focusing Liberal Arts (studies such as language, philosophy, history, literature, or abstract science, intended to provide general knowledge and to develop general intellectual capacities)."

    8. Traditional Secondary Education Statistics • Wisconsin CTE Statistics • Number of Public High Schools: 540 • Number of Public High Schools Offering Solely (or primarily) CTE courses: 3 • Number of Students in Public High Schools: 292,100 • Number of Secondary Students Enrolled in CTE: 37,605 • Number of Public Community Colleges: 18 • Number of Students at Public Community Colleges: 115,357 • Number of Postsecondary Students Enrolled in CTE: 143,847

    9. Traditional Secondary Education Statistics-continued National and State Postsecondary Enrollments

    10. Traditional Secondary Education Statistics-continued Post Graduation Plans - All Options - All StudentsEntire State of Wisconsin 2008-09 Compared to Prior Years

    11. Charter Schools “are nonsectarian public schools of choice that operate with freedom form many of the regulations that apply to traditional public schools. They are accountable for both academic results and fiscal practices to several groups: the sponsor that grants them, the parents who choose them, and the public that funds them.” (WI DPI)

    12. Charter Schools – continued Charter school’s: • Are exempted from most local and state educational laws • Provide a program of elementary or secondary education or both • Are Non-sectarian, not affiliated with a religious school in any form • Do not charge tuition • Comply with federal laws related to special education and discrimination • Admit students on the basis of a lottery if more apply than can be served • Comply with state and federal audit requirements • Meet all local, state and federal health and safety requirements”

    13. Charter School Statistics • The DPI website (2010) states, Wisconsin currently has 206 charter schools in operation. Of those schools, 109 serve students through grade 12. Since the establishment of charter schools in 1993, 95 schools have closed. • The DPI does not have stats on the correlation between students who attend charter schools and go onto post-secondary education. Therefore, we have decided to conduct a survey of local charter schools to identify their tracking measures.

    14. Impact on Career and Technical Education • Increased efforts by Government • Changes to Career and Technical Education Curriculum • Alternate delivery methods available

    15. Charter School’s Impact on CTE • Flexibility of career exploration • Charter schools can be very specific to one career interest, such as health, business or technology or they can be very broad and explore multiple career areas. • No matter what path a charter school takes it has the ability to expose students to more in-depth career discovery, which is a critical piece career and technical education. • Integration of career exploration.

    16. Data Collection and Analysis • How many graduating students go on to post secondary education? • What do you track regarding graduating students? • Do you have statistics that connect the courses they took in High School with their post secondary path? • How is post secondary Career and Technical Education viewed in your school? • How have budget cuts affected your Career and Technical course offerings?

    17. Post Secondary Traditional High School Survey Results How many graduating students go on to post secondary education?

    18. Post Secondary Traditional High School Survey Results - continued How have budget cuts affected your Career and Technical course offerings? LHS - All departments had to go through some sacrifices, just some more than others. PHS - A couple of years ago, when our Business Ed teacher retired, a new one wasn't hired due to budget constraints. However; we had a new teacher here by 2nd semester that year. PEHS - They have not. business and tech. ed. instructors are full-time, their schedules and classes are full. MCHS - Tech Ed department is only Part time but classes are full.

    19. Charter School Survey Results • 2 of 10 Responded • Ladysmith School District – Health Care Academy • Mellon School District – Mellon Technical Charter School • No Tracking on Post-Graduation Plans • Both Believe 100% of Students do go onto Post-Secondary Education

    20. Ladysmith Health Care Academy • Students graduate with a CAN, EMT or Dental Assistance degree • Budget cuts have not effected the school • Community Support

    21. Mellon Technical Charter School • Mellon works with 4 other small schools in the area to recruit students for the charter school • Develop Individualized Learning Plans which is career-based • Emphasis giving back to community by requiring 25 hours of community service a year • Graduates must complete a Senior Project that is either career-based or giving back to the community in some way.

    22. Secondary education has a key role to play in the development of youth to provide them the knowledge needed to attain post-secondary education, in addition to the level of education that is indispensible in creating a bright future for those individuals and to create a strong global economy.

    23. Strategies to Solve the Issue • "Policymakers and educators must address the twin challenges of increasing "access to" and "quality and relevance of "secondary education for all young people.“ • "Secondary education systems everywhere will need to be more flexible, relevant, and responsive to both local needs and the global environment in the 21st century." (Worldbank, paragraph 11)

    24. What Can We Do? • Implement Career Clusters and Career Pathways at the Middle/Junior High School grade levels as well as Charter Schools. • Continue with the options of flexible secondary education through charter schools. • Provide “Hand-holding” of all high school students. Increase the assistance offered to high school students throughout their secondary education to inform and assist with the decision process of post-secondary educational goals.

    25. Conclusions and Further Issues for Consideration • Can Career and Technical Education be incorporated into all high schools (traditional public, private, and charter) to address the needs of learners and the economy? • Can a better bridge be developed at the postsecondary level, both two and four year institutions, to continue the education/training environment that is successful in the high schools that excel in Career and Technical Education programming? • Can the charter school model be replicated within traditional public high schools that do not have the resources to support a separate charter school program based on low population?

    26. Conclusions and Further Issues for Consideration - continued • Can Career and Technical Education survive within high schools due to budget cuts and financial restraints currently driving K-12 schools to cut programs? • Can the K-16 education system in the United States adapt to the rapidly changing needs of a global economy?

    27. "Successful Schools are dynamic places with high expectations for everyone. Effective improvements happen planfully and are built around goals that educators, parents and other community members know and support.”

    28. References Evers, T. (2009). Wisconsin Charter School Yearbook. Retrieved from http://dpi.wi.gov/smv/pdf/2009-10yearbook.pdf National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Consortium, State Profile for Wisconsin. Retrieved October 1, 2010, from http://www.careertech.org/state_profile/show/Wisconsin NGA Center for Best Practices. Retooling Career Technical Education. Retrieved October 5, 2010, from http://www.nga.org/Files/pdf/0706TECHED.PDF Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Career Education. Career Clusters. Retrieved October 6, 2010, from http://dese.mo.gov/divcareered/career_clusters.htm Schnaiberg, L. (1998). Milwaukee, State Battle Over Charter Schools. Education Week, 18 (8), 3. US Journal of Academics website. (2010) U.S. Academic Levels, Definitions and Expected Durations. Retrieved September 27, 2010, from http://www.usjournal.com/en/students/help/degrees.html WINNS Successful School Guide. What are students’ postgraduation plans? Retrieved September 30, 2010, from http://data.dpi.state.wi.us/Data/PostGradIntentPagetion=RE

    29. References - continued Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. (2010). Career and Technical Education. Retrieved September 26, 2010, from http://www.dpi.state.wi.us/cte/ Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. (2010). Charter Schools Q & A. Retrieved September 26, 2010, from http://dpi.wi.gov/sms/csqanda.html Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. (2010). Charter Schools for 2009-10. Retrieved September 26, 2010, from http://dpi.wi.gov/sms/cs_2010schlist.html Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. (2010). Wisconsin Information Network for Successful Students. Retrieved September 28, 2010, from http://www.dpi.state.wi.us/sig/improvement/index.html The World Bank. Secondary Education. Retrieved September 27, 2010, from http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTEDUCATION/0,,content MDK:20521252~menuPK:738179~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:282386,00.html