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Ch 24 The Silk Road

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  1. Ch 24 The Silk Road Introduction The Opening of the Silk Road Rome Trades Glassware for Silk The Eastern Silk Road The Western Silk Road Cultural Exchanges Along the Silk Road Summary
  2. March 13 Objective: Cite the locations of the trans-Eurasian “silk roads” in the period of the Han dynasty and the Roman Empire. Warm Up: If possible, pick an item of clothing and read the label to find out where it came from. Find the location on the world map on pg 380 of your textbook. Discuss PowerPoint Preview of the “Silk Road”
  3. March 14 Objective: Cite the locations of the trans-Eurasian “silk roads” in the period of the Han dynasty and the Roman Empire. Warm Up: What are lines of latitude? What are lines of longitude? Activities: Brain Pop video and quiz Locate sites along the silk road using degrees of latitude and longitude
  4. March 18-19 Objective: Cite the locations of the trans-Eurasian “silk roads” in the period of the Han dynasty and the Roman Empire. Warm Up: Get out projects to be checked during class? (A zero will be inserted today for any student without a project) Activities: Collect world maps (Ancient civilizations – Be sure your name is on the map) Locate sites along the silk road using degrees of latitude and longitude (Finish map from Friday – This map goes inside of the foldable when finished) Introduce foldable project. Begin foldable. Due on Thursday.
  5. Introduction Trade Traveled along the Silk Road network of smaller trade routes stretching 4,000 miles across Asia Went from Luoyang and Han capital, Chang'an to Mediterranean ports like Antioch in Syria Connected Han dynasty and the Roman Empire Impact transmitted goods and ideas goods Chinese traded silk and jade for spices from India and glassware from Rome ideas Buddhism
  6. Major Stops on the Road Taklamakan Desert
  7. The Opening of the Silk Road Made possible by the expansion of the Han dynasty Father of the Silk Road Zhang Quian, (Jang Chee yen) a Chinese explorer first trip 138 BCE, a Han emperor sent Zhang Qian west with 100 men Mission to form alliance with western peoples against the Huns Traveled to Iran Taken prisoner and escaped twice Results Learned about cultures to the west Brought back information about Persia, Syria, India, and Rome second trip Discovered a powerful type of horse better suited for war Discovered grapes Established trade relationships with some central Asian peoples Chinese traders continued to travel farther west and small trade routes connected to form larger networks
  8. The Opening of the Silk Road Made possible by the expansion of the Han dynasty Father of the Silk Road Father of the Silk Road, Zhang Quian, a Chines explorer first trip 138 BCE, a Han emperor sent Zhang Qian west with 100 men Mission to form alliance with western peoples against the Huns Traveled to Iran Taken prisoner and escaped twice Results Learned about cultures to the west Brought back information about Persia, Syria, India, and Rome second trip Discovered a powerful type of horse better suited for war Discovered grapes Established trade relationships with some central Asian peoples Chinese traders continued to travel farther west small trade routes connected to form larger networks Silk as a Trade Good Silk fibers used to make cloth Silk cloth is strong, warm, light, and soft Only Chinese knew how to make it process for production was secret revealing the secret was a crime punishable by death
  9. Rome Trades Glassware for Silk Silk was first seen during a battle near the Euphrates River. Enemy unfurled colorful silk banners Romans lost battle Silk was a luxury item rare and expensive richest Romans could only afford a strip or a patch of silk stitched to their white togas Romans traded gold and glassware for silk Romans knew how to blow glass into wonderful, delicate shapes Chinese unfamiliar with glass production
  10. The Eastern Silk Road Luoyang to Kashgar Traveling the Eastern Silk Road Led west along the Gobi Desert to Dunhuang, in northwestern China Protected by the Great Wall From Dunhuang to Kashgar Dangers Bandits Sudden sandstorms Mirages An image of something that isn't really there, such as water Routes southern route northern route distances between oases like Loulan and Lucha were shorter Mode of transportation caravans Bactrian camels double eyelids nostrils that can close to keep out blowing sand Used to carry food and water for a traveler
  11. The Eastern Silk Road Goods Exchanged Along the Eastern Silk Road Silk lightweight and valuable went to Mediterranean shores and on to Rome Other Chinese Products Fine dishware (became known as china), ornaments, jewelry, cast-iron products, and decorative boxes From Central Asia Horses, jade, furs, and gold India cotton, spices, pearls (from oysters) and ivory (from elephant tusks)
  12. The Western Silk Road Kashgar Central trading point where Eastern and Western Roads met Road ended in Mediterranean ports like Antioch Traveling the Western Silk Road Pamir Mourtains Difficult trek mountain passes narrow and dangerous Part of the route called the "trail of bones" Sometimes goods were hand carried Some peaks over 20,000 feet Travelers suffered from altitude sickness headaches dizziness ringing in the ears Fertile Valley located in present day Afghanistan Iranian Plateau south of the Caspian Sea Across Mesopotamia Tigris River Ctesiphon in modern-day Irag Eastern bank, north of ancient Babylon major stop Syrian Desert Travelers threatened by tigers, lions, scorpions Tormented by flies
  13. The Western Silk Road Goods Exchanged Along the Western Silk Road Egypt, Arabia, and Persia Perfumes, cosmetics, and carpets Central Asia metal items, dyes and sometimes, slaves Rome glass products, including trays, vases, necklaces, and small bottles asbestos made into fireproof cloth coral Chinese used to locate illness coral believed to lose color when placed on skin of sick person gold A lot was shipped out of Rome Tiberius passed a law forbidding the wearing of silk claim was made that wearing silk made someone weak Reduce the amount of gold leaving the empire
  14. Cultural Exchanges Along the Silk Road Learned to made products for themselves By 500 CE, Chinese had learned to make glass and Romans made silk Diets, gardening, and agriculture changed China grapes, alfalfa, cucumbers, figs, pomegranates, walnuts, chives, sesame, and coriander West roses, azaleas, chrysanthemums, peonies, camellias, oranges, peaches, and pears Buddhism Spread Began in India Introduced to China around the middle of the first century Chinese Buddhists journeyed on foot to India and returned with Buddhist texts Became a major religion in China
  15. Summary Silk Road opened under Han remained a major route for more than 1,000 years Dangers and Difficulties Goods and Cultural Exchange Silk and glassware Buddhism