Reaching & Teaching Children with AD/HD - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Reaching & Teaching Children with AD/HD

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  1. Reaching & Teaching Children with AD/HD ADHD Association 20th Anniversary Conference Reykjavik, Iceland 26 September, 2008 11:00 – 12:00 Sandra Rief, Presenter www.sandrarief.com

  2. Think of one student/child...

  3. What strategies might I use to ...?

  4. Page 1 Common School Performance Difficulties in Students with AD/HD • Poor organization, time management, study skills • Minimal/inconsistent production & output (both in-class assignments & homework) • Some academic weaknesses – particularly in written language/writing skills

  5. Page 1 Common School Performance Difficulties in Students with AD/HD • Forgetfulness/memory-related issues • Difficulty following rules • Behavioral & social difficulties affecting interpersonal relationships • Unable to sustain effort for long-term goals (need short term goals/rewards)

  6. Page 1 Things to Keep in Mind About AD/HD • Disorder in performance, output, and production • Approximately 30% developmental delay (in self-control, inhibition and executive functions)

  7. Page 1 Common Misinterpretations of Behavior • Doesn’t work independently (lazy/apathetic) • chronic memory problems, lacks prerequisite skills, difficulty blocking internal/external distraction • Doesn’t follow directions (noncompliance) • difficulty with recall/memory of verbal directions & translating into action, switching gears, interrupting what they’re doing

  8. Page 1 Common Misinterpretations of Behavior • Repeatedly making the same mistakes (willful, deliberate) • respond too quickly to refer to past experience • Not sitting still (can control if tried harder) • neurologically-based need to move, difficulty regulating motor activity

  9. Page 2 Common Misinterpretations of Behavior • Poor social skills/judgment (deliberate, poor parenting) • difficulty noticing/interpreting social cues, inhibiting responses, skill/performance deficit

  10. Our Perception...Our Reaction

  11. Page 2 Key Elements for School Success • Flexibility & willingness of teacher to accommodate • Knowledge & understanding of ADHD, LD, and other neurobiological disorders • Close home/school communication • Engaging & interactive teaching strategies

  12. ATTENTION 2 min 30 2 min 30

  13. Maintain Attention (Active) 2 min 04

  14. Page 2 Key Elements for School Success • Effective classroom management • Environmental adaptations & accommodations • Positive behavioral supports & interventions • Help & training in organization/ time management/study skills

  15. Page 2 Key Elements for School Success • Limiting amount of homework and reducing written workload (as needed)

  16. Page 2 Key Elements for Success • Respecting & accommodating learning style differences • Adaptations and modifications according to student needs • Differentiated instruction

  17. One Size Doesn’t Fit All

  18. Page 2 Key Elements for Success • Active learning

  19. Kinesthetic – 53 sec

  20. Page 2 Key Elements for Success • Developing & bringing out student strengths • Belief in student…Doing what it takes

  21. Page 3 Tertiary prevention Intensive interventions ~ 5% Chronic/intense ~ 15 % At-risk Secondary prevention Targeted interventions Primary prevention Universal interventions ~80 % Norm www.pbis.org

  22. Creating the Climate for Success of ALL Students

  23. Schedule/Routines/Rules 2 min 40

  24. Page 3 Reverse the “praise deficit”: It takes changing the interactions 3:1 (Minimally)

  25. Page 3 Recognition, Acknowledgement, and Specific Praise “I really appreciate how you ______.” “I appreciate the self-control you are using.” “I noticed how hard you were working on ______.” “I see the effort you are showing.” “Thank you for the good choice you just made.”

  26. Climate Class Short – Class + Reinforcement Systems 2 min 35

  27. Page 3 Common Antecedents or Triggers • Environmentally Based: • (e.g., poor comfort level - too noisy/crowded; lack of structure/organization/interesting materials) • Physically Based: • (e.g., ill, tired, hungry, thirsty, medication related)

  28. Page 3 Common Antecedents or Triggers • Related to Specific Activity or Event: • (e.g., unclear instructions, substitute teacher, competitive game) • Related to Specific Time: • (e.g., first period, before/after lunch, transitions)

  29. Page 3 Common Antecedents or Triggers • Performance/Skill Demand: (e.g., to remain seated, share materials, take a timed test, read independently, write in cursive, wait for a turn)

  30. Physical Needs 53 sec.

  31. Page 4 Prevent Problems: Alter the Antecedents • Increase the structure • Closer monitoring & supervision • Motivating materials and assignments • Increase opportunity for movement and active participation • Increase cueing & prompts • Prepare for transitions • Adjust the environmental factors

  32. Page 4 Environmental Accommodations • Preferential Seating (location & alternatives to chair)

  33. Movin’ Sit Jr www.theraproducts.com

  34. Page 4 Environmental Accommodations • Preferential Seating (location & alternatives to chair) • Standing work stations • Office area/study carrel, 2-desks • Adding structure and organization (e.g., color-coding) • Visual supports & prompts

  35. Visual Cues Page 4 • May talk with teacher permission only. • May leave seat with teacher permission only. • May use 12” voice. • May leave seat when needed (e.g., to turn in work) • May talk quietly with other students. • May leave seat to work with other students.

  36. Page 4

  37. Page 4