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Campus Business-IT Implementation Organizations. CITI Meeting April 13, 2009. IT Application, Data and Infrastructure Services Stack with Illustrative Services. End user & Support. Process & Information. Application & Data. Middle Applications. OS & Platforms. Server & Device.

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slide2

IT Application, Data and Infrastructure Services Stack with Illustrative Services

End user & Support

Process & Information

Application & Data

Middle Applications

OS & Platforms

Server & Device

Data centers & Comm

Networking & Telecom

Secure, Reliable, Responsive

Applicable Governance & Management

Defined Quality & Transparent Costs

  • End user transaction and decision
  • Help desk
  • End user desktop, network, security support

IT-enabled

processes require

all services

Services can be

provisioned

in different ways

and with different

groupings

The objective of

the operating

model is to specify

the approaches

that best meet

UCLA’s needs

  • Business process and workflow
  • Data mining and manipulation
  • Search and information access
  • IT workflow and transaction applications
  • Data models and data reporting
  • Identity management, portal
  • Web access, data base
  • Search, reporting
  • Operating system
  • Software platforms
  • Database management systems
  • Server and database processors
  • Virtual architectural services
  • Server management, sys admin
  • Data centers, hubs, security, power, UPS, network
  • Email, chat, video conference, web meeting,
  • hosting, monitoring
  • Network, VPN, wireless, DNS, NOC
  • Voice mail, teleconference services
  • Phone, PDA, cell, telecom, text

6/4/2014

slide3
The Technology Stack: Distinction Between Application and Data Services and IT Infrastructure Services

Data centers & Comm

OS & Platforms

Middle Applications

Networking & Telecom

Process & Information

End user & Support

Server & Device

Application & Data

Institutional

Local

Process Standardization

and Integration (Data Sharing)

IT Enabled Processes

IT Application Services

Core Infrastructure Foundation

IT Infrastructure Services

3

rendition of ucla s current research administration data application architecture
Rendition of UCLA’s CurrentResearch Administration Data & Application Architecture

Enterprise Data

Data

Applications &

App Infrastructure

Technology

Platforms & Data

Centers

ORA

OIPA

Clinics

Schools

Divisions

Networking &

Telecom

CTS Network Backbone

MCCS Network Backbone

Analog Telephones – External Network Connections

Adapted from: Architecture as Strategy: Creating a Foundation for

Business Execution, J. Ross, P. Weill, D. Robertson, HBS Press June 2006

Based on companies operating in Business Silos

implementation organization for erp is important
Implementation Organization for “ERP” is Important
  • Change processes, ways of doing business, job content and technology
  • Key drivers of organizational approaches
    • Size of organization
    • Relative level of campus centralization
    • Culture
    • Centralization of the IT function
  • Steering Committee
  • Advisory Committee
  • Core group of functional and technical people that are advisory
    • Gartner 75% of projects with are successful – 75% of projects without fail
army business focused model
ARMY – Business Focused Model

“The primary benefit of the Business Focused model is that functional requirements are more likely to be fully satisfied. Although functional requirements will likely be met, the approach to meeting them may not result in a standardized, maintainable, or cost effective solution. This is due to the functional organization prioritizing its own needs over those of the overall enterprise.”

ERP Governance

Source: http://www.army.mil/armybtkc/focus/sa/erp_gov.htm

army it focused model
ARMY – IT Focused Model

“This arrangement often results in more standardized implementations and better alignment with enterprise architecture, but at the cost of sub optimizing business functionality.”

Assumes Centralized IT Organization

army holistic enterprise approach
ARMY – Holistic Enterprise Approach

Executive Sponsors and CIO

Ultimate decision authority

Stakeholders who are users but not primary owners of ERP but

Primary owners of process and systems

Enterprise capability – change mgmt, ERP product knowledge,

enterprise architecture, knowledge enterprise portfolio

Business and IT project teams

confidence in the model
Confidence in the Model
  • Close to current SR2 project organization
  • Close to that recommended by the Burton Group for the IWE project
  • Used for Ohio State University PeopleSoft (Financials, HR, Procurement & Grants Admin) Implementation
a portfolio management process structure for ucla

A Portfolio Management Process & Structure for UCLA

Committee on IT Infrastructure (CITI)

May 27, 2008

CITI Portfolio Management Process

disney s cross reference across business units identify leverage opportunities and cost
Disney’s Cross Reference Across Business UnitsIdentify Leverage Opportunities and Cost

Create & manage products, services, media

Market products & services

Sell products & services

Perform order manage-ment

Manage supply chain ops

Manage & support cust.

Plan & manage perform-ance

Manage finances & accntg.

Manage human resources

Manage Inform-ation resources

Manage physical assets

Manage support services

WDW

DLR

TP&R

WDI

DLP

Total

ABC Network

Governance of IT investment can be aligned around business process owners.

ESPN

ABC Cable

Media Networks

ABC Radio

ABC TV stations

BVTV

WDTVI

Total

BVG

DCP

DCP – Int’l

DCP

DDM

Disney Pub.

Merch. Lic.

Disney Store

This analysis reveals costs by business process and informs where the IT investment is focused, business unit cross reference reveals leverage opportunities

Total

BVI

BVHE – Int’l

Studio

Corporate

Corp

BVHE – NA

Tomorrowland

Filmed Ent.

Total

Total

Grand Total

CITI Portfolio Management Process

ucla business processes level 1 0 for ucla s four core processes
UCLA Business Processes-- Level 1.0 for UCLA’s Four Core Processes --

Conduct & Manage Research

Level O

Processes

1.2

Level 1

Processes

Document

Federal

Compliance

Present / Publish

Research

Results

Identify

Opportunities

(33)

(23)

1.2.9

1.2.17

1.2.1

Document

Non-Federal

Compliance

Manage Intellectual

Property/

Patents/Licensing/

Technology

Transfer

Prepare Internal

Forma & Protocols

(29)

1.2.2

1.2.10

Prepare Proposals

Conduct Research

& Incur Costs

(38)

1.2.18

(16)

1.2.3

1.2.11

Coordinate

Research Parks/

Joint Ventures

Prepare & Submit

Goldenrod

Perform Clinical

Trials

(13)

1.2.4

1.2.12

(3)

1.2.19

Review & Submit

to Funding Agency

Invoice Funding

Sponsors

Management

Data

1.2.5

1.2.13

(13)

1.2.20

Negotiate

Award

Prepare & Submit

Financial Reports

Institute Quality Control Measures

(13)

1.2.6

1.2.14.

1.2.27

(7)

Close Out Awards

Set-Up

Award

1.2.7

1.2.15

Ethics (Policies,

Procedures,

Subject Testing)

Collect Accounts

Receivable

1.2.16

(14)

1.2.8

CITI Portfolio Management Process

15

step one
Step One

Understand the Existing Environment

“As Is”

Validate & Refine Summary of Findings

Define new IT Portfolio Management Model

Conduct Gap and Capacity Analysis

Define Objectives, Priorities and Process Metrics

  • Define information and analysis needs
  • Collect information and data using normalized data / industry process classifications and models
    • Interviews
    • Baseline research
    • Benchmarking
    • Surveys
    • Focus groups
  • Develop an understanding of the problems and issues
  • Level set on the definition, upper and lower limits, and parameters regarding value, cost and risk

Summer 2008

CITI Portfolio Management Process

-- WORKING DRAFT--

16

create a process systems matrix using existing list of systems
Create a Process-Systems - Matrix using existing list of systems

Sample Work Product

UCLA IT Portfolio Management Process

cross reference across business units identify leverage opportunities and cost
Cross Reference Across Business UnitsIdentify Leverage Opportunities and Cost

CITI Portfolio Management Process

citi endorsement
CITI Endorsement

Agreement with the basic framework & objectives for IT portfolio management

Agreement to do “as-is” analysis

Define information needs

Categories/thresholds for collecting applications information

What information will be collected in first iteration

Define Level 1 processes

Facilitated session

Subgroup of CAO

Agreement to review and approve a detailed plan at CITI’s June meeting

Consult CITI subgroup

Summer start

Integrate with IT planning and cost review

CITI Portfolio Management Process

19

19

draft problem statement visibility phase 1
Draft Problem Statement: Visibility (Phase 1)

Problem:

UCLA’s IT services are not institutionally visible or even known

UCLA’s planning processes do not reveal new IT services and systems

End of application and/or product life-cycles are difficult to collectively see and deal with 

Impact:

The distribution and patterns of IT services are unknown

Architecture scaling of solutions is virtually impossible

Difficult to do cross-unit planning

UCLA IT Portfolio Management Process

draft problem statement financial phase 2
Draft Problem Statement: Financial(Phase 2)

The distribution and profile of IT investment is institutionally unknown

Duplicative spending on IT systems is generally not an active decision and unnecessary duplication is not easily addressed

There is a wide range of life cycle cost calculation approaches making it difficult to compare investments and often leading to under-estimated TCO and underfunded projects

There is no good way to proactively monitor and compare end of life cost profiles and to project technology change costs

UCLA IT Portfolio Management Process

resource requirements funding
Resource Requirements - Funding

2008/09 – Phase I

(subsequent phases will be budgeted after fact-finding in first year)Project manager (1/2 FTE, includes benefits) $70KAnalyst (1/2 FTE, includes benefits) $30KFacilitation (8 days @ $1,500 / day) $12KAdministrative Support (through Front Desk)        $10KWorking sessions (venue, refreshments, etc.)      $ 3K

Total: $125K

  • Assumptions
    • The project manager and analyst at 50% time could potentially be combined into one person/position -- for a 100% FTE salary @ about $100,000 / year). 
    • The facilitator's rate is based on $1,500/day.
    • The administrative support is based on student assistance with the scheduling and coordination of meetings, as well as copying and other activities in preparation for the sessions
    • There would be some working session costs, estimated at about 3% of the budget.

UCLA IT Portfolio Management Process