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Fun Fruit Nutrition. The Guide. July-2010. Improving the Nutritional Environment in Primary and Secondary Schools in Prince George’s County Maryland. A PowerPoint Presentation Presented by Kenya L. Young August 8, 2010. OBJECTIVE.

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slide1
Fun

Fruit

Nutrition

The Guide

July-2010

Improving the Nutritional Environment in Primary and Secondary Schools in Prince George’s County Maryland

A PowerPoint Presentation Presented by Kenya L. Young

August 8, 2010

objective

OBJECTIVE

To help combat childhood obesity, is imperative for parents, school board members, as well as state and local health departments to take action in implementing effective measures that could be used in creating a healthy nutritional environment for our youth. While we all can take a stand in making a difference, it is essential for one to see the critical role that schools have in the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. Today I will discuss the much needed change in the nutritional environment of both primary and secondary schools.

outline
Outline

Fun

Fruit

Nutrition

what is obesity
Obesity is a terminology that is often used to define the presence of excess adipose tissue. While there are several measures that can be used for diagnoses, the most common used method is Body Mass Index (BMI). With Adipose tissue being primarily responsible for secreting a number of products such as lipids, metabolites, and cytokines, one must note that excess adipose tissue could result in harmful affects to one’s health

The Obesity Society. (2010). What is Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.obesity.org/information/what_is_obesity.asp

What Is Obesity?

Fun

Fruit

Nutrition

obesity cont
Being obese causes one to have too much body fat that their health becomes at risk

Overweight and obesity are both terminologies used to define weight that is greater than what it should be

Overweight and obesity can also be used to distinguish levels of weight that have the probability of increasing the onset of diseases and illnesses

For children and teens, obesity is diagnosed after calculating the BMI and plotting it on the CDC BMI-for-age growth charts for either boys or girls. A percentile ranking is then attained, allowing healthcare providers to determine the weight status of the evaluated child.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). Defining Childhood Overweight and Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/defining.html

Obesity Cont.

Fun

Fruit

Nutrition

Obesity Overview

sample bmi calculations
The attached graph displays sample

calculations of BMI numbers and results

for a ten year old boy.

Weight Status Category Percentile Range

Underweight Less than the 5th percentile

Healthy weight 5th percentile to less than the 85th

Overweight 85th to less than the 95th percentile

Obese Equal to or greater than the 95th Percent.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009).

About BMI for Children and Teens. Retrieved from http:

//www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/childrens

_bmi/about_childrens_bmi.html

Sample BMI Calculations

Fun

Fruit

Nutrition

childhood obesity
Childhood Obesity

Fun

Fruit

Nutrition

Obesity is caused by a caloric imbalance and is stipulated by genetic, behavioral and environmental factors.

Obese youth are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease

Bone and joint complications, sleep apnea, and social and psychological problems are all risk factors for children and adolescents who are obese

Obese youth are more prone to becoming overweight adults, resulting in increased risks for adult health problems such as stroke, type 2 diabetes, and various forms of cancer

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Childhood Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/

alarming trends
Alarming Trends

Obesity rates are drastically increasing

Desirable physical activity levels are not being met

Increased intake of foods that are high in fat

Adult diseases are developing in children who are obese

World Health Organization. (2010). Childhood Overweight and Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/chilhood/en/

statistical data
Statistical Data

The Maryland Youth Tobacco survey discovered that adolescents ages 13-18 years of age have a 11% obesity rate and a 15% overweight rate

The Maryland Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance found that children between the ages of 2-5 years who

were in the WIC Program had a15% obesity rate and a 18% overweight rate

Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. (n.d.). Prevalence of Childhood Obesity, Nationwide: Data. Retrieved from http://fha.maryland.gov/cdp/co_data.cfm

promoting healthy youth
Promoting Healthy Youth

Healthy lifestyle habits, such as healthy eating and physical activity, can lower the risk of becoming obese and developing associated diseases

Minimize restaurant and fast food dining

Engage in family meals

Limit television viewing

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Childhood Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/index.htm

changing the nutritional environment in primary and secondary schools
Changing The Nutritional Environment in Primary and Secondary Schools

Schools Can Make A Difference

Nutrition and physical activity are essential factors for students

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Addressing Childhood Obesity Through Nutition and Physical Activity: CDC’s Division of Adolescent & School Health. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/pdf/addressing_obesity.pdf

the role of schools in confronting childhood obesity
The Role of Schools in Confronting Childhood Obesity

The physical activity and eating behaviors that affect weight are influenced by several sectors of society such as the media, schools, faith-based institutions etc.

The involvement of influenced sectors could greatly aid in reversing the epidemic

Wechsler, H., Mckenna, M., Lee, S., & Dietz, W. (2004). Childhood Obsesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/physicalactivity/pdf/roleofschools_obesity.pdf

the role of schools
The Role of Schools

Schools can not achieve their primary mission of education if students are not physically, mentally, socially fit and healthy

Less emphasis have been placed on a healthy mind and body

Wechsler, H., Mckenna, M., Lee, S., & Dietz,W. (2004). Childhood Obsesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/physicalactivity/pdf/roleofschools_obesity.pdf

The National Association of State Boards of Education have realized that health and success within schools are interrelated

It is imperative for educators, policy makers, and schools to contribute to the obesity epidemic

why do schools play such a huge role
Why Do Schools Play such a Huge Role?

Over 95% of our youth are enrolled in schools

Promotion of physical activity and healthy eating have always been a fundamental component of the American educational experience

Studies have shown that well-designed school programs that are implemented can effectively promote the need for physical activity and healthy eating.

Physical activity, good nutrition, physical education and nutrition programs have a huge impact on academic performance

Wechsler, H., Mckenna, M., Lee, S., & Dietz,W. (2004). Childhood Obsesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/physicalactivity/pdf/roleofschools_obesity.pdf

what can schools do
What Can Schools Do ?

Improve the school’s nutritional environment

healthy nutritional environment
Healthy Nutritional Environment

A healthy school nutritional environment places emphasis on teaching and promoting physical activity and nutrition within classrooms and lunch rooms

A healthy nutritional environment can provide positive health messages to students

Wechsler, H., Mckenna, M., Lee, S., & Dietz,W. (2004). Childhood Obsesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/physicalactivity/pdf/roleofschools_obesity.pdf

cdc s published guidelines that identify effective school policies
CDC’s Published Guidelines That Identify Effective School Policies

Health Education

Physical Education

Health Services

Nutrition Services

Counseling

Psychological and Social Services

Healthy School Environment

Family and Community Involvement

Health Promotion for Staff

Wechsler, H., Mckenna, M., Lee, S., & Dietz,W. (2004). Childhood Obsesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/physicalactivity/pdf/roleofschools_obesity.pdf

health policies for school
Health Policies for School

In providing health policies and messages, the lifestyle choices of students would not only be taught in the classroom, but in the environment of each school day

conclusion
Conclusion

The childhood obesity epidemic has grown to become one of the most prevalent public health crisis. Without strong emphasis and contributions from schools, the epidemic is less likely to change.

Wechsler, H., Mckenna, M., Lee, S., & Dietz,W. (2004). Childhood Obsesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/physicalactivity/pdf/roleofschools_obesity.pdf

closing statements
Closing Statements

Although our journey is just beginning, together we can make a difference in promoting the quality of life and health in children

Thank you

references
References

The Obesity Society. (2010). What is Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.obesity.org/information/what_is_obesity.asp

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). Defining Childhood Overweight and Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/defining.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). About BMI for Children and Teens. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/childrens

_bmi/about_childrens_bmi.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Childhood Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/

World Health Organization. (2010). Childhood Overweight and Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/chilhood/en

Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. (n.d.). Prevalence of Childhood Obesity, Nationwide: Data. Retrieved from http://fha.maryland.gov/cdp/co_data.cfm

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Addressing Childhood Obesity Through Nutrition and Physical Activity: CDC’s Division of Adolescent & School Health. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/pdf/addressing_obesity

Wechsler, H., Mckenna, M., Lee, S., & Dietz, W. (2004). Childhood Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/physicalactivity/pdf/roleofschools_obesity.pdf

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