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Making Science Accessible to English Learners: A Guidebook for Teachers
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  1. Making Science Accessible to English Learners: A Guidebook for Teachers A Matchbook Version Carr, J., Sexton, U., & Lagunoff, R. (2006). Making science accessible to English learners: A guidebook for teachers. San Francisco, CA: WestEd.

  2. Matchbook Versions • Facilitator Notes— • Use short time frames to focus group on concepts that may be complex. • This strategy is particularly useful for utilization of large amounts or complex information. Activity drawn from Wellman, B., & Lipton, L. (2004). Data-driven dialogue: A facilitator’s guide to collaborative inquiry. Sherman, CT: MiraVia, LLC, pp. 106-107.

  3. Facilitator Describe the operational definition of “matchbook” Succinct Brief report of pages assigned Captures concepts Work time is intentionally short Use public timer to allow groups to monitor progress Participants Produce matchbook version that is a brief 10–12 word description that captures the concept’s critical elements. 20 minutes production time The product is a rough draft, not a polished document. 3–5 minutes to share the essential elements of your matchbook. Instructions Modified activity from Wellman, B., & Lipton, L. (2004). Data-driven dialogue: A facilitator’s guide to collaborative inquiry. Sherman, CT: MiraVia, LLC, pp. 106-107.

  4. Teaching Science Understanding Language Development Understanding 5 Levels of English Language Development Contents • Teaching the Language of Scientists • Scaffolding Science Learning • Assessing English Learners • Applying Strategies in the Classroom Carr, J., Sexton, U., & Lagunoff, R. (2006). Making science accessible to English learners: A guidebook for teachers. San Francisco, CA: WestEd.

  5. Academic language should be selected and deliberately taught through six steps. (Pp. 41-51) 4. Teaching the Language of Scientists Textbook Example, p. 220: • Engage: Front-load • Atom • Proton • Neutron • Electron • Charge Carr, J., Sexton, U., & Lagunoff, R. (2006). Making science accessible to English learners: A guidebook for teachers. San Francisco, CA: WestEd.

  6. Scaffolding is temporary support that is reduced as students become more proficient. (Pp. 65-68) 5. Scaffolding Science Learning Textbook Example, p. 166: • Cues: orally and visually draw attention to the vocabulary and objectives Carr, J., Sexton, U., & Lagunoff, R. (2006). Making science accessible to English learners: A guidebook for teachers. San Francisco, CA: WestEd.

  7. Form groups of 3 Science ELL A person of your choice Review Tools & Strategies Card assignment. Your Turn

  8. In the next 20 minutes provide the following information on chart paper: A description of the big idea from the assigned page(s) in 10–12 words. An appropriate place to use the strategy in a textbook lesson. Your Turn

  9. Reciprocal Teaching Structured dialogue between students that question, summarize, clarify, and predict. (Pp. 80-81) One Example: Textbook Example, pg 166: • How is a floating tire and marbles thrown at it like Brownian motion? • Why do scientists use the term “Brownian Motion”? Carr, J., Sexton, U., & Lagunoff, R. (2006). Making science accessible to English learners: A guidebook for teachers. San Francisco, CA: WestEd.

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  24. Time Is Up!

  25. Share Your Matchbooks • Select your spokesperson by finding out which group member has been in their current job assignment the longest. • In three minutes or less share your group’s matchbook with the whole group. • As you listen, note at least one item from each presentation. • Share with your table one of the ideas that stuck with you. • Share with the large group a common theme the table group found among the ideas you just discussed.

  26. Thank you for sharing your expertise.