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Understanding By Design. A Contemporary Approach to Curriculum Design. Understanding by Design (UbD) may be thought of as purposeful task analysis: . Given a task to be accomplished, how do we get there? What lessons and practices are needed to master key concepts?

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understanding by design

Understanding By Design

A Contemporary Approach to Curriculum Design

understanding by design ubd may be thought of as purposeful task analysis

Understanding by Design (UbD) may be thought of as purposeful task analysis:

Given a task to be accomplished, how do we get there?

What lessons and practices are needed to master key concepts?

- Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, Understanding by Design

stage one identify desired results

Stage One: Identify Desired Results

Elements of the Design: Goals, Knowledge and Skills, Essential Questions, Enduring Understandings

key elements
Key Elements

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

goals
Goals
  • The Goals for each unit are typically the national, state, and/or local standards.
    • They often represent content that must be met for a particular grade level or subject.
    • Goals are over-arching in nature.

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

knowledge and skills
Knowledge and Skills
  • These are objectives that students should be able to know and to do.
  • Specific content knowledge and skills must be included.

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

essential questions
Essential Questions
  • These are open-ended questions that are thought-provoking and interpretive.
  • Essential Questions are at the core of your content. They often lead to or require further investigation.
  • Essential Questions:
    • Have no obvious right answer
    • Raise more questions
    • Address concepts that are important to the subject matter.

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

enduring understandings
Enduring Understandings
  • Enduring Understandings:
    • They are Big Ideas (knowledge) that will be transferred; they are made into statements.

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

ubd s facets
UbD’s FACETS
  • Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe state that there are Six Facets of Understanding.
  • When the facets are a part of the curriculum design, students are offered opportunities to obtain key understandings.
six facets of understanding
Six Facets of Understanding
  • Explanations: Definitions, clarifications, reasons that provide foundation knowledge
  • Interpretation: Narratives, translations, metaphors, etc. that provide meaning
  • Application: Ability to effectively apply knowledge in a variety of contexts.
  • Perspective: Critical and insightful points of view. Recognize the significance of ideas.
  • Empathy: Ability to see things from other points of view.
  • Self-Knowledge: Awareness of one’s limitations and strengths, as well as the ability to recognize the roles others play.

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

examples of performance tasks
Examples of Performance Tasks:
  • Explanation: Write letters home describing what the pioneer life was like.
  • Interpretation: Compare English and Spanish versions of Cinderella to determine if language influences meaning.
  • Application: Adapt events from history that contributed to societal reaction to the Civil Rights Movement by recreating a scene and presenting it to a group.
  • Perspective: Participate in a roundtable discussion on the impact of the First Amendment on a specific group.
  • Empathy: Create a diary that reflects the day in the life of a soldier.
  • Self-Knowledge: Write a self-assessment reflecting on your progress in mastering a skill.
stage 2 determine acceptable evidence
Stage 2: Determine Acceptable Evidence
  • This stage identifies specific assessments that will be used.
  • Identify the summative assessment.
  • What is the culminating activity that will represent the understandings students have gained from the unit?

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

stage three plan learning activities

Stage Three: Plan Learning Activities

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

stage three plan learning activities1
Stage Three: Plan Learning Activities
  • This is the stage where specific learning activities (lessons) are planned to accompany each unit.
  • The lessons designed in this stage should be based on the desired results from stages 1 and 2.
  • W.H.E.R.E.T.O. is an acronym for planning steps to help meet the requirements of the unit.
    • The acronym does not represent the order to be followed

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

w h e r e t o
W.H.E.R.E.T.O.
  • W - Where are you going with this unit?
    • How does the unit fit in the curriculum and with state standards?
    • What is expected?
  • H - How will you hook the students?
  • E - How will you equip students for expected performances?
  • R - How will you rethink or revise?
  • E - How will students self-evaluate and reflect their learning?
  • T - How will you tailor learning to varied needs, interests, and learning styles of the students?
  • O - How will you organize the sequence of learning?

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

in summary
IN SUMMARY
  • Begin with what you want your students to understand at the end of the unit.
  • Identify each of the elements required in each stage.
    • Identify Desired Results
    • Determine Acceptable Evidence
    • Plan Learning Activities
contact information
Contact Information

For access to the UbD Exchange to search or build units in the UbD format, contact:

DeNelle Knowles

at

knowlesd@edcuationcentral.org