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  1. BR _ main The American Dream Immigrants The Great Depression Mortgage Warm-up Questions

  2. BR_1 The American Dream

  3. BR_1_pop American Dream is the belief that everyone in the United States has the chance to achieve success and prosperity. For ordinary people, it means a happy family, an ideal job, and a nice house. For minorities and immigrants, it also includes freedom and equal rights.

  4. BR_2 Immigrants Introduction First Immigrants

  5. BR_2_1.1 Introduction Listen to the passage and fill in the blanks with the missing words.

  6. BR_2_1.2 Apart from “Native Americans” — , all Americans have ancestors who were immigrants. The United States has the home of immigrants from all over the world. Some immigrants come to the United States a place to practice their religion freely, while others seek political or protection. Still others arrive in hopes of building a better life for and their families. Indians ______ become _______ in search of __________ economic ________ themselves __________

  7. BR_2_2 First Immigrants

  8. BR_2_2_pop The first immigrants to America came almost from western Europe. During the first decades of the 17th century, settlers from England colonized Virginia and New England. Immigration to New England began in 1620 when English Puritans established Plymouth Colony in present-day Massachusetts. The values of these Puritan settlers strongly influenced the culture of the American colonies and later of the United States.

  9. The Great Depression BR _3

  10. BR _3_pop The Great Depression is considered the most severe economic crisis in the industrialized world. It began when American stock market fell on Friday, Oct. 24, 1929, and continued the following Tuesday, known as Black Tuesday, with a greater fall. The Depression struck many other countries as well, particularly Germany, Japan, and Britain. In the early 1930s millions of people lost their jobs, and millions of businesses and banks failed. President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal policies improved the situation, but the Great Depression did not come to an end until World War II when industrial production for the war increased.

  11. BR_4 Mortgage Mortgage How to Get a Mortgage

  12. BR _ 4_1 Mortgage

  13. BR _4_1_pop Mortgage is an agreement to have money lent, especially to buy a house or land, with the house or land belonging to the lender until the money is repaid. It enables a person to buy a house without having enough money to pay for it completely. If the borrower fails to repay the loan, the lender may force the sale of the house to recover the amount of the loan.

  14. BR _4_2 How to Get a Mortgage

  15. BR _4_2_pop A borrower can get a mortgage from a bank, credit union, or other lender. Most lenders require the borrower to have a certain amount of money to use as a down payment. For example, if an individual wants to buy a home priced at $50,000 and the lender requires a down payment of $2,000, the individual will apply for a loan of $48,000 to pay for the difference. Payments for the loan are usually made monthly. The life of the mortgage can be 15, 20, 30, or even 40 years.

  16. BR _5 Warm-up Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. What is the American Dream in your opinion? In what ways can a person be considered as being successful? What is the key to success? Tell a story of a successful person.

  17. GR _main Part Division of the Text Further Understanding

  18. GR _ 1 Part Division of the Text Parts Para(s) Main Ideas With determination and with help from Mr. Crawford, Tony achieved his dream of having his own farm. 1 1~29 Tony’s career set the author thinking about why and to what extent he had been successful. 2 30~33

  19. Further Understanding GR _ 2 For Part 1 Table Completion Matching Scanning For Part 2 Questions and Answers

  20. GR_2_P1_1.1 Table Completion How Tony Fulfilled His American Dream Para(s) Time Expressions Tony’s Steps toward Success one evening during the Great Depression Tony started to work as a help at Mr. Crawford’s house. 1~10 summer passed into fall Tony got a job clearing snow at Mr. Crawford’s factory. 11~13

  21. GR_ 2_P1_1.2 Para(s) Time Expressions Tony’s Steps toward Success Tony asked to be trained as an apprentice, and later learned to be a skilled worker. 14~16 one day Tony bought a house with the help of Mr. Crawford. a year or two passed 17~21

  22. GR_ 2_P1_1.3 Para(s) Time Expressions Tony’s Steps toward Success Tony bought a farm and sent for his family in Italy. 22~27 after about two years Tony died, leaving his family a prosperous farm and his children educated. during the war 28~33

  23. Match the following three columns. GR _ 2_P1_3.1 1 — C — II 2 — A — III 3 — B — I

  24. Scanning GR _ 2_P1_3.1 Scan the text to find out descriptions of Tony’s physical appearance. Para. 1 He was about five-foot-seven or eight, and thin. Para. 22 He seemed to stand a little straighter. He was heavier. He had a look of confidence. Para. 27 … neatly dressed

  25. Questions and Answers GR _2_P2 1. What is the key to Tony’s success? Tony worked very hard to create his American Dream. Besides, he was determined, self-controlled, optimistic, self-respected, honest and responsible. All these helped him become successful. 2. Compare Tony with the greatest industrialists. Both Tony and the greatest industrialists are successful in pursuing their American Dreams. They reached their success by working hard, and by the same values and principles. The only difference was that they had different financial achievements.

  26. Tony Trivisonno’s American Dream D R _ Text 1-3 Frederick C. Crawford He came from a rocky farm in Italy, somewhere south of Rome. How or when he got to America, I don’t know. But one evening I found him standing in the driveway, behind my garage. He was about five-foot-seven or eight, and thin. “I mow your lawn,” he said. It was hard to comprehend his broken English. I asked him his name. “Tony Trivisonno,” he replied. “I mow your lawn.” I told Tony that I couldn’t afford a gardener.

  27. “I mow your lawn,” he said again, then walked away. I went into my house unhappy. Yes, these Depression days were difficult, but how could I turn away a person who had come to me for help? When I got home from work the next evening, the lawn had been mowed, the garden weeded, and the walks swept. I asked my wife what had happened. D R _ Text 4-7 “A man got the lawn mower out of the garage and worked on the yard,” she answered. “I assumed you had hired him.” I told her of my experience the night before. We thought it strange that he had not asked for pay.

  28. D R _ Text 8-10 The next two days were busy, and I forgot about Tony. We were trying to rebuild our business and bring some of our workers back to the plants. But on Friday, returning home a little early, I saw Tony again, behind the garage. I complimented him on the work he had done. “I mow your lawn,” he said. I managed to work out some kind of small weekly pay, and each day Tony cleaned up the yard and took care of any little tasks. My wife said he was very helpful whenever there were any heavy objects to lift or things to fix.

  29. Summer passed into fall, and winds blew cold. “Mr. Craw, snow pretty soon,” Tony told me one evening. “When winter come, you give me job clearing snow at the factory.” Well, what do you do with such determination and hope? Of course, Tony got his job at the factory. The months passed. I asked the personnel department D R _ Text 11-14 for a report. They said Tony was a very good worker. One day I found Tony at our meeting place behind the garage. “I want to be ’prentice,” he said.

  30. We had a pretty good apprentice school that trained laborers. But I doubted whether Tony had the capacity to read blueprints and micrometers or do precision work. Still, how could I turn him down? D R _ Text 15-16 Tony took a cut in pay to become an apprentice. Months later, I got a report that he had graduated as a skilled grinder. He had learned to read the millionths of an inch on the micrometer and to shape the grinding wheel with an instrument set with a diamond. My wife and I were delighted with what we felt was a satisfying end of the story.

  31. A year or two passed, and again I found Tony in his usual waiting place. We talked about his work, and I asked him what he wanted. “Mr. Craw,” he said, “I like a buy a house.” On the edge of town, he had found a house for sale, a complete wreck. I called on a banker friend. “Do you ever loan money on character?” I asked. “No,” he said. “We can’t afford to. No sale.” “Now, wait a minute,” I replied. “Here is a hard-working man, a man of character, I can promise you that. He’s got a good job. You’re not getting a damn thing from your lot. It will stay there for years. At least he will pay your interest.” D R _ Text 17-20

  32. Reluctantly, the banker wrote a mortgage for $2,000 and gave Tony the house with no down payment. Tony was delighted. From then on, it was interesting to see that any discarded odds and ends around our place — a broken screen, a bit of hardware, boards from packing — Tony would gather and take home. After about two years, I found Tony in our familiar meeting spot. He seemed to stand a little straighter. He D R _ Text 21-24 was heavier. He had a look of confidence. “Mr. Craw, I sell my house!” he said with pride. “I got $8,000.” I was amazed. “But, Tony, where are you going to live without a house?”

  33. D R _ Text 25-26 “Mr. Craw, I buy a farm.” We sat down and talked. Tony told me that to own a farm was his dream. He loved the tomatoes and peppers and all the other vegetables important to his Italian diet. He had sent for his wife and son and daughter back in Italy. He had hunted around the edge of town until he found a small, abandoned piece of property with a house and shed. Now he was moving his family to his farm.

  34. D R _ Text 27-28 Sometime later, Tony arrived on a Sunday afternoon, neatly dressed. He had another Italian man with him. He told me that he had persuaded his childhood friend to move to America. Tony was sponsoring him. With an amused look in his eye, he told me that when they approached the little farm he now operated, his friend stood in amazement and said, “Tony, you are a millionaire!” Then, during the war, a message came from my company. Tony had passed away.

  35. D R _ Text 29-30 I asked our people to check on his family and see that everything was properly handled. They found the farm green with vegetables, the little house livable and homey. There was a tractor and a good car in the yard. The children were educated and working, and Tony didn’t owe a cent. After he passed away, I thought more and more about Tony’s career. He grew in stature in my mind. In the end, I think he stood as tall, and as proud, as the greatest American industrialists.

  36. D R _ Text 31-33 They had all reached their success by the same route and by the same values and principles: vision, determination, self-control, optimism, self-respect and, above all, integrity. Tony did not begin on the bottom rung of the ladder. He began in the basement. Tony’s affairs were tiny; the greatest industrialists’ affairs were giant. But, after all, the balance sheets were exactly the same. The only difference was where you put the decimal point. Tony Trivisonno came to America seeking the American Dream. But he didn’t find it — he created it for himself. All he had were 24 precious hours a day, and he wasted none of them.

  37. D R _ Text 1-3_S “I mow your lawn,” he said. How many times is the sentence — “I mow your lawn.” — repeated in the text? Why is it repeated? The sentence is repeated four times. That’s because it shows Tony’s determination in finding a job, and his optimistic view that people would help a man who needed a job.

  38. D R _ Text 11-14_S Well, what do you do with such determination and hope? Paraphrase the sentence. It is hard to refuse a person who is determined and hopeful to get a job.

  39. D R _ Text 15-16_S My wife and I were delighted with what we felt was a satisfying end of the story. 1. Paraphrase the sentence. My wife and I were happy with what Tony had achieved, and thought that the whole thing had thus been settled. 2. Was Tony satisfied with this end? Tony was not satisfied. He kept on working hard until he fulfilled his better dreams.

  40. From then on, it was interesting to see that any discarded odds and ends around our place — a broken screen, a bit of hardware, boards from packing — Tony would gather and take home. D R _ Text 21-24_S 1. Why did Tony take home the discarded odds and ends? Tony bought a house, which was a complete wreck. To fix and decorate it, and, above all, to save money, he took home the discarded odds and ends. 2. Translate the sentence into Chinese. 从那以后,只要我家附近有什么被人扔弃的零星杂物,坏了的屏风啦,五金器具啦,包装纸板啦,托尼都要收起来拿回家,看他这个样子真是有意思。

  41. D R _ Text 25-26_S He had hunted around the edge of town until he found a small, abandoned piece of property with a house and shed. 1. What does “property” refer to? “Property” refers to the farm he wanted to buy. 2. Translate the sentence into Chinese. 他在小镇周边到处找,终于找到一处没人要的一小块地产,有一幢房,还有间小棚。

  42. D R _ Text 29-30_S1.1 He grew in stature in my mind. 1. Paraphrase the sentence. He grew taller and greater in my mind. His social status greatly improved in my mind.

  43. 2. Describe the change of Tony’s social status in Mr. Crawford’s mind. D R _ Text 29-30_S1.2 When Mr. Crawford first met Tony, Tony was “about five-foot-seven or eight, and thin”, and his English was broken. He remained standing when he talked to Mr. Crawford. He did not have high social status. After he bought his farm several years later, he “seemed to stand a little straighter”, and he “had a look of confidence”. He and Mr. Crawford “sat down and talked”. His social status improved enough to allow him to sit down with Mr. Crawford. After he passed away, Mr. Crawford thought “he stood as tall, and as proud, as the greatest American industrialists.”

  44. D R _ Text 31-33_S1 Tony did not begin on the bottom rung of the ladder. He began in the basement. • What does “ladder” refer to? And what does • “basement” refer to? “Ladder” refers to the way to success. “Basement” refers to Tony’s starting point. He was worse than ordinary people. He had nothing to help him seek his American Dream. 2. What can you infer from the sentence? Tony had nothing when he arrived in the United States, and he built up from nothing.

  45. D R _ Text 31-33_S2.1 But, after all, the balance sheets were exactly the same. The only difference was where you put the decimal point. • What do balance sheets refer to? And what does • decimal point refer to? Balance sheets are used to show whether a person or a company is financially successful. Here they are used to judge a person’s life achievements. If the decimal point is moved, a number will become either smaller or bigger. Here it shows the difference in the amount of money Tony and the greatest industrialists had made.

  46. D R _ Text 31-33_S2.2 2. What can you infer from the sentences? What Tony and the greatest industrialists achieved was exactly the same. The only difference was that they had different financial success.

  47. D R _ word _ turn away1 turn away: refuse to help (sb.) or allow (sb.) to enter a place 他拒绝了所有的应征者。 He turned all the applicants away. He turned away several people who didn’t have the tickets.

  48. D R _ word _ turn away2 Collocation: turn down 拒绝;调低 turn in 交还,上交 turn into 使变成 turn off 关;拐弯 turn out 生产,制造;证明,结果 turn over 仔细考虑 turn up 出现,来到;开大,调大

  49. work out: plan; solve; calculate D R _ word _ work out 他们已经设计出把宇宙飞船送上太空的方法。 They’ve worked out a method of sending a spacecraft to the space. The accountant has worked out your share of the expense at 1,000 yuan. 会计已算出你的那份花费为1,000元。 Collocation: work at 从事于,致力于 work up 引起,激起,逐渐上升

  50. weekly: 1. adj. happening once a week or every week D R _ word _ weekly He thinks his weekly wage of 400 yuan is enough. adv.once a week; every week; by the week 2. 《21世纪报》每周出版一次。 21st Century is published weekly. 3. n.a publication issued once a week Business Weekly《商业周刊》 Publishers’ Weekly(美)《出版商周刊》 a twice weekly 半周刊